Month: January 2013

Beyond Instagram: Should photographers accept the risks inherent in social networks?

In the early days, Instagram was liberating for journalists and photographers, saysKarim Ben Khelifa. “In most cases, we never really meet our audiences, and with Instagram you can interact directly with your followers. When you think about it, Instagram, more than Facebook, is the perfect tool for photojournalists. Everyone communicates with photographs today. Of course, when we post images on that platform, we’re not necessarily telling a story like we usually do – with 15 images, for example. But there’s a sort of romanticism, where we seek beautiful or incredible images.” For Tomas Van Houtryve, a VII photographer, Instagram has allowed him to take pictures he’d stop taking altogether. “Sometimes, with digital cameras and huge raw files, I actually hesitate to take a picture because I don’t want to deal with downloading it and backing it up on my hard drive and captioning it later,” he says. “With Instagram, it has kind of brought that joy back where I can just take a moment – it’s worth what it’s worth – send it out and move …

2013-12-11T12:12:22+00:00

Photography industry shows mass opposition to government copyright changes

The controversial provisions are part of the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, sponsored by Vince Cable and Lord Marland of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. The bill was originally written to eradicate unnecessary bureaucracy but presents a series of provisions, introduced through the back door by the Intellectual Property Office, to allow the use of Orphan Works such as images that lack metadata and whose copyright owners cannot be found. However, in an unprecedented move, 73 organisations and individuals have co-signed a briefing letter sent to members of the House of Lords to express their deep opposition to the changes to the UK’s copyright laws. Among the signatories are Thomson Reuters, British Pathé, Press Association, Getty Images, Associated Press, Corbis, Magnum Photos, the Mary Evans Picture Library, the Association of Photographers, the British Association of Picture Libraries and Agencies, The Art Archive, Nature Picture Library, ITN, Stop43, Image Source, the Royal Photographic Society and many others. “The reason why all these organisations came together is because these proposals to change the UK’s copyright …

2013-12-11T12:12:49+00:00

Agence France-Presse infringed on photographer’s copyright in landmark Twitter case

The case, launched in early 2011 by Agence France-Presse against freelance photographer Daniel Morel, is moving forward, as district judge Alison J Nathan has found in summary judgment that the news agency, as well as The Washington Post, did not have the right to distribute Morel’s images of the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake. When the disaster hit, Morel was in Port-au-Prince. According to a counter-claim the photographer filed against AFP, Morel spent most of that day photographing. With the help of a friend, he created a Twitter account in the username PhotoMorel, where he posted, through the Twitpic service, 13 images he had taken. Morel accuses AFP of distributing and selling his images without prior permission, and has countersued, alleging that AFP had violated the Copyright Act of 1976, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Lanham Act. Morel also brought those claims against Getty Images, which has a worldwide distribution deal with AFP, and a range of other media organisations, including The Washington Post, all of which also used Morel’s images without authorisation. In this week’s landmark …

2013-12-11T12:13:15+00:00

Agence France-Presse infringed on photographer’s copyright in landmark Twitter case

The case, launched in early 2011 by Agence France-Presse against freelance photographer Daniel Morel, is moving forward, as district judge Alison J Nathan has found in summary judgment that the news agency, as well as The Washington Post, did not have the right to distribute Morel’s images of the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake. When the disaster hit, Morel was in Port-au-Prince. According to a counter-claim the photographer filed against AFP, Morel spent most of that day photographing. With the help of a friend, he created a Twitter account in the username PhotoMorel, where he posted, through the Twitpic service, 13 images he had taken. Morel accuses AFP of distributing and selling his images without prior permission, and has countersued, alleging that AFP had violated the Copyright Act of 1976, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Lanham Act. Morel also brought those claims against Getty Images, which has a worldwide distribution deal with AFP, and a range of other media organisations, including The Washington Post, all of which also used Morel’s images without authorisation. In this week’s landmark …

2013-12-11T12:13:29+00:00

News agencies go on the offensive, call for judicial review of copyright changes

The world’s largest news agencies have delivered a Letter Before Claim to the UK’s business secretary Vince Cable, in what is described as the first step in the process of initiating a Judicial Review – a formal legal challenge to planned governmental legislation. Associated Press, Getty Images, Reuters, British Pathé, Press Association, and the Federation of Commercial and Audiovisual Libraries are objecting to Clauses 66, 67 and 68 of the Enterprise and Regularoty Reform Bill, which will allow the government to make changes to copyright exceptions, reduce the length of term of copyright, and allow the licensing of Orphan Works. In its Letter Before Claim, the consortium of news agencies call into question the government’s rational to propose these changes. “The consortium believes that the economic growth arguments originally put forward to justify the Government’s proposals are without basis and has challenged the Government’s plans to introduce its proposed changes through so-­‐called `Henry VIII clauses` -­ secondary legislation which is not subject to the full scrutiny of Parliament, which includes visibility to the public.” Despite …

2013-12-11T12:13:44+00:00

Administrators shuts down all Jessops stores

“Since my appointment, we have reviewed the position of the business and held extensive discussions with suppliers around their support for ongoing trading,” says Rob Hunt, joint administrator and partner at PwC. “It is apparent that we cannot continue to trade and as a result we have had to make the difficult decision to begin the closure of all 187 Jessops stores at the close of business today.” The move will cost the jobs of 1370 employees, with further job losses likely at the company’s head office in Leicester, say the administrators at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “The stock will be collected over the coming days and returned to a central warehouse. It will be returned to suppliers if they are entitled to it. As a consequence of the closure, Jessops is no longer able to accept returned product from customers.” Consumers will also lose on money spent on gift vouchers and pre-paid orders.Affected users are advised to visit the PwC website for more details. “This is an extremely sad day for Jessops and its employees,” adds Hunt in …

2013-12-11T12:14:05+00:00

Photo50 returns to the London Art Fair

The exhibition takes place from 16 until 20 January at the Business Design Centre in Islington. This year’s exhibition, A Cyclical Poem, is curated by Nick Hackworth, director of Paradise Row Gallery in London. The exhibition brings together a selection of work from the 1970s to the present day by eight documentary photographers and photojournalists who have lived and worked in Britain. The featured photographers are: Dorothy Bohm, Brian Griffin, Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen, Homer Sykes, Paul Hill, Marketa Luskacova, Ian Beesley and Chris Steele-Perkins. Billed as ‘an elliptical mediation on the idea of historical change’, the exhibition looks at the relationship between photography and themes such as time, memory and repetition. “We’re showing photographers who’ve had long enough careers they have returned to earlier subjects,” says Hackworth. “The exhibition shows work that has been produced with a very conscious relationship to time and memory.” Jonathan Burton, director of the London Art Fair, commented: “We originally introduced Photo50 as way of encouraging our visitors to start collecting photography. It has always been a selling exhibition and we felt that by presenting work in …

2013-12-11T12:14:19+00:00

Camera retail chain Jessops goes into administration

In a statement issued to the press, PricewaterhouseCoopers, which has been appointed to administer the struggling company, says that Jessops has seen its core marketplace suffer “a significant decline in 2012 and forecasts for 2013 indicate that this decline would continue.” Jessops’ position also deteriorated in the run-up to Christmas as a result of reduced confidence in UK retail, the administrators continue. “Despite additional funding being made available to the company by the funders, this has meant that Jessops has not generated the profits it had planned with a consequent impact on its funding needs. This was exacerbated by a credit squeeze in the supplierbase.” PwC will now review Jessops’ financial position and “hold discussions with its principal stakeholders to see if the business can be preserved. Trading in the stores is hoped to continue today but is critically dependent on these ongoing discussions. However, in the current economic climate it is inevitable that there will be store closures.” Jessops employs more than 2000 people in 192 stores around the UK. The administrators have also announced …

2013-12-11T12:14:30+00:00

Japanese photography legend Shomei Tomatsu dies

Shomei Tomatsu, born on 16 January 1930 and whose work is currently on show at the Barbican in London as part of the exhibition Everything Was Moving: Photography for the 60s and 70s, is known for his iconic photograph of a melted bottle taken in Nagasaki in 1961 as part of a magazine assignment to portray the devastation and reconstruction of the city. But it’s his non-documentary approach to photography, with his dream-like aesthetics, that made Tomatsu one of the most influential Japanese photographers of his time. “Tomatsu was a major influence on the so-called provoke generation of Japanese photographers, even though he was only a few years older than them,” says photography critic Gerry Badger. “Named after the magazine Provoke, these young photographers, such as Takuma Nakahira and Daido Moriyama, developed a freewheeling, highly expressionistic visual style that seemed to push the individual photographic image to the edge of descriptive incoherence. Tomatsu was a proponent of this approach, though not quite as extreme as some. The important thing about the whole group, and Tomatsu also, was that the …

2013-12-11T12:00:07+00:00

BJP Staff