Month: June 2014

Apple to abandon Aperture in favour of iCloud innovations

Apple is to stop the development of its photography application, Aperture, the company has announced. At its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco earlier this month, Apple introduced a new ‘Photos’ app for OS X, which will enable users to access their images and videos on iCloud from any Apple device. The app will replace the existing iPhoto. In a statement published by technology website The Loop, Apple said: “With the introduction of the new Photos app and iCloud Photo Library, enabling you to safely store all of your photos in iCloud and access them from anywhere, there will be no new development of Aperture. When Photos for OS X ships next year, users will be able to migrate their existing Aperture libraries to Photos for OS X.” The announcement is good news for rival Adobe, which will be looking to entice iPhoto and Aperture users to take up its products. “Put simply, we’re doubling down on our investments in Lightroom and the new Creative Cloud Photography plan, and you can expect to see a rich roadmap of rapid innovation for …

2014-07-04T20:07:55+00:00

Piemanson by Vasantha Yogananthan

Summertime and the living is, if not easy for the inhabitants of Piemanson then at least it’s free. France’s last wild beach, Piemanson, is a 10km stretch of sand in the heart of the Camargue Regional Nature Reserve, open to campers from 01 May; officially people can only stay for one night, but many stay for longer, and a few stay for the whole summer. On 01 September the police close it off for winter, and the inhabitants join together to mark the occasion with a huge bonfire, the makeshift elements of their temporary homes going up in smoke. [bjp_ad_slot] French photographer Vasantha Yogananthan stumbled across the beach by accident and, amazed by what he saw, documented it over the next five years. With no running water, life isn’t the idyll it might first appear, but the people who come relish the opportunity to live close to nature, and many have returned time and again. “It’s been going since the 1970s, so there are people who first came with their parents who now come with their own children,” says Yogananthan. “When they see people who are not …

2014-07-04T20:00:27+00:00

Nikon releases D810

“It will produce the finest image quality in Nikon’s history,” claim the makers of the D810, Nikon’s latest high-resolution DSLR. The 36.3-megapixel DSLR is an upgrade to the D800 and D800E, released just over two years ago. “In true Nikon tradition [we have made] the best even better,” said the company at a press conference in London. Aimed at both professionals and advanced enthusiasts, the D810 features an FX-CMOS sensor, designed without an optical low-pass filter, an ISO range of 64 to 12800 (extendable from 32 up to 51200 equivalent) and an Expeed 4 image processor (the same image-processing engine as used in the D4S). “Feedback from professional photographers has been integral to the development of this product, upping the game of high-resolution photography,” said Simon Iddon, group product manager for DSLR products at Nikon UK, in a press statement. “Significant increases in speed and ISO versatility, along with new features that minimise the camera’s internal vibrations during shooting for incredible stability, make the Nikon D810 the ultimate tool for visionary photographers working across a broad range of …

2014-07-04T16:21:08+00:00

Channel 4 airs Zed Nelson immigration film

Zed Nelson has never shied away from covering difficult topics, and in his new documentary film, which premieres tonight on Channel 4, he stays true to form. The 30-minute film, Europe’s Immigration Disaster, tells the story of the Lampedusa migrant boat tragedy, which took place on 03 October last year; 360 of the estimated 500 people on board a boat headed for Europe drowned off the coast of the Mediterranean island after the vessel capsized. The migrants had been making their way from North Africa to seek asylum in Northern Europe. Nelson’s film tells their story through testimonies from the survivors. The Institute photographer was commissioned to make the film by Channel 4 for its investigative current affairs programme, Dispatches. The commission came shortly after the disaster and following a three month-long residency that Nelson had been doing with arts organisation Photoworks in Rome. During the residency, Nelson had started to develop a photography and film project about migration in the Mediterranean. [bjp_ad_slot] “Channel 4 liked what I’d done and wanted me to leave the next day …

2014-06-30T10:44:16+00:00

Yorkshire Festival pays tribute to Tour de France with Bicyclism exhibition

The North of England is in the midst of a cycling craze that shows little sign of abating – at least for the next few weeks. Yorkshire has gone cycle crazy to celebrate this year’s Tour de France Grand Départ – the opening of the annual three-week-long, multiple-stage bicycle race – which starts in Leeds on 05 July. It is not the first time the Tour de France, which dates back to 1903 and takes a different route each year, has come to the UK. In fact, the world’s largest and most famous cycle race has visited Britain three times in its 111-year history; the last time was in 2007, in a route that extended from London to Canterbury in Kent. A number of events are due to take place across Yorkshire in the run-up to and during the Grand Départ, including an exhibition that celebrates the history of photography and cycling in Leeds. [bjp_ad_slot] Bicyclism, which opens today (24 June) at Leeds City Museum and runs until 06 July, brings together archival images with contemporary photography around the theme of cycling. It is the work of Leeds-based photographer Casey Orr, musician and writer Boff Whalley (formerly …

2014-06-24T14:43:11+00:00

Esther Teichmann talks to BJP post-Photo Levallois win [updated]

Esther Teichmann is the winner of this year’s Photo Levallois Award for her series Fractal Scars, Salt Water and Tears, 2012-2014. As part of the prize, the German–American artist was awarded a €10,000 grant and an exhibit of her work at Photo Levallois Festival in France this autumn. “I’m honoured to have won this award,” Teichmann told BJP. “I intend to use the money to extend the project, and I’m also working on a short film piece.” The jury gave special mentions to German photographer Stephanie Gudra, and Sylvain Couzinet-Jacques, from France, whose work will also be exhibited at the festival. On the judging panel this year was Lucy Conticello, director of photography at Le Monde’s M magazine; Joshua Chang, chief curator at the Center of Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona; Aron Mörel of Mörel Books; Stéphane Decreps, deputy mayor of culture at the city of Levallois; and Joel Riff of the Curiosity Chronicles in Paris. [bjp_ad_slot] Teichmann’s winning series is an edit from the last two years’ worth of work, the London-based photographer explains. Featuring female nudes, landscapes and still lifes, Fractal Scars combines photography with painting and collage, which Teichmann uses to create …

2014-06-21T08:19:50+00:00

Mack releases Frowst by Joanna Piotrowska

Joanna Piotrowska’s publication Frowst won Mack’s First Book Award in April this year, and has just been published by the London-based publisher. The book features a series of black-and-white staged photographs of members of Piotrowska’s family. Through her images, the Royal College of Art graduate explores the idea of anxiety and the family, touching on themes such as family relationships, which can be both oppressive and rewarding, and dysfunction within the family unit. Piotrowska’s carefully posed subjects – quite often positioned in close proximity to each other – look almost sculptural. The result is a series of images that are intimate yet claustrophobic, and unsettling at the same time. It is no accident that the meaning of the book’s title refers to a warm but stuffy atmosphere. [bjp_ad_slot] Polish-born Piotrowska, who has exhibited her work in countries including Ireland, Spain, France, Poland and the UK, was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2013, and the exhibition Jerwood Encounters: Family Politics, curated by Photoworks. The First Book Award, now in its third year, is awarded to a photographer who has not yet had a book published by a third-party publishing house. Industry professionals are invited …

2014-06-20T11:59:36+00:00

An English Landscape

“I have written about surveillance, and am critical of it, but I don’t think images can make arguments,” says Trevor Paglen. “They can only draw attention to things and help people learn how to see. They can only hold things up for consideration – but holding things up for consideration is very powerful.” Paglen was speaking at the opening of his installation at Gloucester Road Underground station – a 62m photograph of an idyllic English landscape which extends along the whole of one of the platforms. Slotted in between 19 brick arches decorating the wall, the image creates the trompe d’oeil effect of looking out into the countryside – a vista that includes the white domes of an American Surveillance Base. It was commissioned by Art on the Underground and will be on show for one year; it has also been included in 75,000 leaflets that will be distributed in all zone 1 Underground stations in London. “Other people have tended to work with each space between the columns; I thought the columns create a very nice Arcadian view and wondered what would happen if I thought of them as …

2014-08-27T15:20:40+00:00

Miniclick talk celebrates photography

Let’s set the record straight – when it comes to photography, it’s not all doom and gloom. Photography isn’t dying, it’s not going away, and there is room within the industry for photographers who have vision, talent and the drive to succeed. The internet – blogs, websites, social media – provides an unprecedented platform in which to share work. In addition, self-publishing is booming, and there are more opportunities than ever to showcase work through independent festivals, pop-up events and exhibitions – there’s never been a more exciting time to be in photography. To celebrate this, and to discuss some of the reasons why there is lots to feel positive about, Brighton-based organisation Miniclick is hosting a series of talks for students who are graduating from the BA in documentary photography course at Newport, the University of South Wales, as well as a panel discussion with industry professionals. Photojournalist Anastasia Taylor-Lind; photographer and Newport BA documentary photography course leader Paul Reas; director at The Silverprint Gallery Fraser Miles; and BJP’s senior writer Gemma Padley will participate in panel discussions, offering their expertise on issues surrounding the industry and helping to …

2014-06-19T17:45:32+00:00

Director of The Photographers’ Gallery receives OBE

Brett Rogers has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday 2014 Honours List for services to the arts. In her thirty-year career, Rogers has been instrumental in establishing photography as a leading art form, both in the UK and internationally. Rogers was appointed director at The Photographers’ Gallery in 2005, and to date has led the London gallery through a number of changes, including a move to new premises on Ramilles Street in Soho and an 18-month-long £9.2m redevelopment project, which saw the gallery transformed into a world-class exhibition and education space for photography. The gallery re-opened to the public in May 2012. [bjp_ad_slot] Prior to The Photographers’ Gallery, Rogers, who moved to the UK from Australia in 1980 to study a Masters at The Courtauld Institute of Art, worked at the British Council from 1985 to 2005 in the Visual Arts Department, where she was director of exhibitions. During her time at the British Council, she was responsible for establishing its photography programme and policy, as well as organising major exhibitions that include: Anish Kapoor for the British Pavilion at the 44th Venice Biennale in 1990; Look at Me – Fashion and …

2014-06-19T17:51:07+00:00

BJP Staff