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Getty names 2014 Grants for Editorial Photography [update]

  • Lisa Nene, 22, looks out at the houses marked for destruction near her home in Inanda, outside Durban. Nene lost both of her parents to the AIDS epidemic before she was twelve, and has since tended to her family’s estate. When the government tried to bulldoze her two rondavels and one two-room house and move her into a transit camp, she joined the shack-dweller’s organization Abahlali baseMjondolo. Nene says, “Even though our parents tell us stories that are heartbreaking, I would say half of the freedom we have received, but not all of it.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Lisa Nene, 22, looks out at the houses marked for destruction near her home in Inanda, outside Durban. Nene lost both of her parents to the AIDS epidemic before she was twelve, and has since tended to her family’s estate. When the government tried to bulldoze her two rondavels and one two-room house and move her into a transit camp, she joined the shack-dweller’s organization Abahlali baseMjondolo. Nene says, “Even though our parents tell us stories that are heartbreaking, I would say half of the freedom we have received, but not all of it.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Chelmidene Whiteboy, 16 (left), and Isabelle Whiteboy, 18 (right), dance to Kwaito music with friends at their family home, in the predominately Afrikaans-speaking mixed-race neighborhood of Hooggenoeg in Grahamstown, South Africa. "I'm worried about this generation just wanting smart clothes," says their mother, Sandra Whiteboy, "but things are changing. The young people who come in now to the supermarket know me, and they call my name. Before, with apartheid, they did not know me, and they did not call my name. I want these girls to see those changes, too. Image © Krisanne Johnson/Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Chelmidene Whiteboy, 16 (left), and Isabelle Whiteboy, 18 (right), dance to Kwaito music with friends at their family home, in the predominately Afrikaans-speaking mixed-race neighborhood of Hooggenoeg in Grahamstown, South Africa. "I'm worried about this generation just wanting smart clothes," says their mother, Sandra Whiteboy, "but things are changing. The young people who come in now to the supermarket know me, and they call my name. Before, with apartheid, they did not know me, and they did not call my name. I want these girls to see those changes, too. Image © Krisanne Johnson/Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Rhodes University students Mark Harrison, 22, of Zimbabwe (right), and Andrew Beach, 24, in their student house in Grahamstown. Their roommate Michael Griffin, 21, a law student from a cattle farm in the Natal Midlands, expressed his admiration for Nelson Mandela: “The one man whom everyone respects is Mandela.… He had obviously the kindest heart ever.… To be on Robben Island for so long and to come out and to forgive so easily. I can’t say so much for the leaders after Mandela, but Mandela started what could have been great, what could still be.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Rhodes University students Mark Harrison, 22, of Zimbabwe (right), and Andrew Beach, 24, in their student house in Grahamstown. Their roommate Michael Griffin, 21, a law student from a cattle farm in the Natal Midlands, expressed his admiration for Nelson Mandela: “The one man whom everyone respects is Mandela.… He had obviously the kindest heart ever.… To be on Robben Island for so long and to come out and to forgive so easily. I can’t say so much for the leaders after Mandela, but Mandela started what could have been great, what could still be.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Thabsile Brightness Sishi, 25 (right), leads the funeral procession for her aunt Thembi Veze, along with her brother, Bongumenzi Knowledge Sishi, 15. Thabsile and Bongumenzi have been living with their aunt and her three children in the Richmond Farm Transit Camp near Durban since 2009. “In the camp, I can’t say it’s nice to stay here– there’s no park, nowhere to play soccer, nowhere to rest,” says Bongumenzi. “It’s too dangerous. There’s no security. We are waiting for moving – they are still building the RDPs. They said we would be here two years.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Thabsile Brightness Sishi, 25 (right), leads the funeral procession for her aunt Thembi Veze, along with her brother, Bongumenzi Knowledge Sishi, 15. Thabsile and Bongumenzi have been living with their aunt and her three children in the Richmond Farm Transit Camp near Durban since 2009. “In the camp, I can’t say it’s nice to stay here– there’s no park, nowhere to play soccer, nowhere to rest,” says Bongumenzi. “It’s too dangerous. There’s no security. We are waiting for moving – they are still building the RDPs. They said we would be here two years.” Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Nkosinathi Dodi, 18, from Khayelitsha, at the Muizenberg water park during a field trip with the Beth Uriel home for disadvantaged young men, in Cape Town. His stay at the home was brief. “He lives in an old abandoned building now, but I see him at church,” says the program director Lindsay Henley. “From the looks of it, he struggles with drugs.” “As much as we tried to help him and as much as he needed help, he’s got no other family, he still got sucked in by the pressures of drugs and gangsterism,” says Melvin Koopman, another a director at Beth Uriel. Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Nkosinathi Dodi, 18, from Khayelitsha, at the Muizenberg water park during a field trip with the Beth Uriel home for disadvantaged young men, in Cape Town. His stay at the home was brief. “He lives in an old abandoned building now, but I see him at church,” says the program director Lindsay Henley. “From the looks of it, he struggles with drugs.” “As much as we tried to help him and as much as he needed help, he’s got no other family, he still got sucked in by the pressures of drugs and gangsterism,” says Melvin Koopman, another a director at Beth Uriel. Image © Krisanne Johnson/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • A prayer starts the classes in the professor Franz Petters's school. Girls and boys seat at oposit sides of the classroom. Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    A prayer starts the classes in the professor Franz Petters's school. Girls and boys seat at oposit sides of the classroom. Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

  • Bolivia. Durango colony. Mennonite family in front of their house (2006). From right to left: Gerhard Klassen (36), Anna Bren (35) with baby Sarah (1), Heinrich (13), Peter (12), Eva (11), Catarina (9), Anna (8), Gerhard (6), Elisabet (5), Elena (3) and Jacob (2). Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

    Bolivia. Durango colony. Mennonite family in front of their house (2006). From right to left: Gerhard Klassen (36), Anna Bren (35) with baby Sarah (1), Heinrich (13), Peter (12), Eva (11), Catarina (9), Anna (8), Gerhard (6), Elisabet (5), Elena (3) and Jacob (2). Image © Jordi Busque/ Getty Images Grants Recipient 2014

Getty Images announces recipients of its 10th grants programme at Visa pour l'Image

Five photojournalists will each receive a US$10,000 grant in Getty Images’ 10th Grants for Editorial Photography.

The 2014 recipients are:

Giulio di Sturco, a Reportage by Getty Images’ featured contributor, who receives an award for his body of work titled Ganges: Death of a River, documenting the demise of the Ganges River in India and examining its impact on the livelihoods of millions of people who live along its banks.

Juan Arredondo, whose portfolio Born in Conflict examines the effects of a 50-year conflict on the youth of Colombia, documenting the experiences of current and former child soldiers caught up in the ongoing war between The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia and the National Liberation Army.

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Jordi Busqué, for his award-winning portfolio, The Mennonites of Bolivia, which documents the lives of the Mennonites – a comparatively unknown religious community of European descent whose way of life has remained relatively unchanged since the 16th century – in the east of the country.

Krisanne Johnson, a Getty Images’ grant recipient in 2009, has been awarded a grant for South Africa’s Post-Apartheid Youth, a project that follows the lives of South African youth, twenty years after the beginning of a multiracial democracy in South Africa.

William Daniels has been awarded a grant for his CAR in Chaos body of work, which examines an unprecedented year of violence in the Central African Republic, which began in March 2013 when rebel coalition Séléka seized power.

Laura Boushnak receives a special grant in celebration of Getty Images’ partnership with organisation Lean In, for her work I Read I Write, which explores the education of women in the Middle East.

The US$10,000 grant was awarded on the occasion of the decade anniversary to a “photojournalist whose work explores subjects that showcase women in an empowering light,” says Getty Images.

Speaking about this year’s Grants for Editorial Photography recipients, Aidan Sullivan, vice president, photo assignments, editorial partnerships and development at Getty Images says: “The 2014 Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography recipients illustrate the talent, passion and integrity that exemplify photojournalism and – after ten years of the grants, proves that photojournalism is alive and well. I am immensely proud of our grants programme and the work that has been brought to the world’s attention because of this.”

This year, Getty Images received 575 submissions from photographers in 89 countries.

The jury for the Editorial Grants programme featured David Furst, international picture editor at The New York Times; Teru Kuwayama, photo community manager at Facebook; Sarah Leen, director of photography at National Geographic Magazine; Jean-Francois Leroy, director general at Visa pour l’Image; and Amy Yenkin, director, documentary photography project at Open Society Foundations.

Founded in 2004, the Grants for Editorial Photography programme has to date awarded $1.2million to photojournalists worldwide. The programme is designed to provide emerging and established professional photojournalists with the financial means and editorial guidance to realise personal projects of journalistic significance.

“Imagery is the unrivalled language of our time and Getty Images is deeply committed to supporting the vision and passions of emerging and established photographers and other artists,” says Jonathan Klein, Getty Images’ co-founder and CEO, in a press statement. “Our global grants programme has spanned a decade and is the largest in the industry, yet each year’s entrants never fail to produce work that both inspires and profoundly moves us. I am extremely proud of the programme and offer my congratulations to our 2014 honourees and to the 80 outstanding recipients over the past 10 years.”

In addition to the Editorial Grants announcement, Getty Images also named the recipients of its two US$20,000 annual Creative Grants, which are awarded to a photographer or filmmaker and agency partner to cover costs as they work together to create compelling new imagery and/or video for a nonprofit of their choice.

This year’s recipients of the Getty Images Creative Grants are: Robin Hammond for Love in a time of persecution, in collaboration with Bring Me Joy and The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission; and photographers Susan Carlonza Chanin and Rana Faure, and filmmaker Poppy de Villeneuve, in partnership with the Project Buchanan agency and not-for-profit RAINN.

Hammond’s project aims to raise awareness of the plight of LGBT communities in Africa, which are persecuted and forced into hiding, while Chanin, Faure and de Villeneuve will produce a short film highlighting the widespread nature of child abuse, rape and sexual violence in the US.

An additional US$20,000 Creative Grant has been awarded to Joshua Kristal, in collaboration with The Inspired Storyteller Collective and Girls Gotta Run, a non-profit organisation that invests in girls who use running and education to empower themselves and their communities.

British photographer Jack Davison, who was one of BJP’s ‘Ones to Watch’ earlier this year, was awarded the Contour by Getty Images Portrait Prize. Now in its second year, the US$10,000 grant recognises excellence in portrait photography by an emerging photographer with less than five years industry experience.

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