Month: January 2016

Constructing Vision: Award winning architectural exhibition opens

Photography and architecture form an unlikely alliance. Photography is time, architecture is space. Architecture is volume, photography is flat. Buildings are made to last, where photography is endlessly reproducible, endlessly malleable, in our digital age. Yet since the photograph’s conception, the two have been inseparable. Be it a bitumen-coated plate or a memory card, photography is our primary medium to communicate and digest architecture, constantly transforming how we perceive and value the world. Building Images, an exhibition of the best architectural photography worldwide, explores the complexity and power of this relationship, showcasing a myriad of interpretations and representations some of the world’s most renowned architectural photographers have to offer. The exhibition, which opens on the 4th of February, features the winning images from The Arcaid Images Architectural Photography Awards 2015. Divided into four categories methodology – Building in use, Exteriors, Interiors and Sense of Place – Building Images demonstrates a broad range of photographic styles and approaches to the medium as well as featuring a diverse set of outstanding architectural forms. Work from overall winner …

2016-01-28T17:13:13+00:00

BJP #7845: The Icons Issue

What goes into creating an icon? Our latest issue scrutinises the muses, photographers and designers that go into creating unmistakable images that speak to the culture of the time – from early 20th century Soviet agitprop to a working-class lad from east London who somehow became one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. BRAND BECKHAM: THE MAKING OF A MODERN ICON “He makes it look so simple…but believe me, it is not.” – Graham Taylor “He is such a big celebrity, football is only a small part.” – Sir Alex Ferguson “It is rare a man can be that tough on the field and also have his own line of underwear.” – President Barack Obama For most figures of popular culture, the acute gaze of the lens is part of the job – to be captured for public consumption, to create a personal iconography that relates to your art. We expect our musicians, our artists and our actors to transform themselves, we demand a visual flair. But from a midfielder from Leytonstone? Not …

2016-02-26T15:59:18+00:00

Sistaaz of the Castle: fashion dreams of Cape Town’s trans sex workers

Dutch photographer Jan Hoek and fashion designer Duran Lantink have always shared an interest in working with models that are different. In his documentary photography, Hoek’s subjects range from homeless people who “look like kings” to heroin addicts with a modelling dream. Lantink uses amateur models in his shows, while employing unconventional design techniques and recycled fabrics to symbolise the different layers of society. Discovering the powerful, unique looks of South Africa’s transgender sex worker community was a coincidence, but one that instantly captured both their imaginations. In Sistaaz of the Castle, Hoek and Lantink zoom in on six girls from transgender support group Sistaazhood, part of the Cape Town sex workers’ organisation SWEAT. Shot under a bridge beside the capital’s castle – the closest thing to a home for most of the girls – Hoek’s photographs show the realities of their lives in parallel with the extraordinary inventiveness that goes into creating their customised outfits. The images express a different story, one that focuses on the girls’ intuitive sense of fashion, rather than the hardships …

2016-01-28T14:15:43+00:00

Connecting the stars, the landscape and our bodies through the image

3 young photographers, 8 American states, 28 days. Celestial Bodies, a new photobook by young artist-photographers Eleanor Hardwick, Rachel Hardwick and Chrissie White, travels through the American West to explore the relationship between our bodies and nature.  “In society and the media, the female body seems to be either hyper-sexualised or shamed, and rarely appreciated for the incredible feat of nature that it really is,” says Rachel. “I think that presenting the female form as somewhat other-worldly and alien, all preconceptions that many of us have linked to the idea of the nude body are stripped away. By looking at it with fresh eyes, within the context of landscapes that almost look as if they could be on another planet, we are able to take a step back and view the world from a new perspective.” London-based sisters Eleanor and Rachel came across Chrissie, based in Seattle, on Flickr years ago, forming a firm kinship around a shared love for photography, exploration and the natural world. The series is rooted in the incredibly varied landscape …

2016-02-02T13:44:26+00:00

Showing the Lives of Cameron’s “Bunch of Migrants”

The Sun leads with “Anarchy near the UK: Brit Activists behind ferry stampede”. The Daily Mail goes with “Migrants Chunnel Stroll to Asylum in Britain”. The Express gets nihilistic: “No End to Migrant Crisis”. Just a couple of miles across the English Channel, the Calais refugee camp now known as ‘The Jungle’ has become a focal point of the current refugee crisis. Each day produces new miseries; from refugees freezing in the bitter cold; the deployment of teargas and rubber bullets by French police, and now clashes between refugees and authorities as bulldozers arrive to scrub what’s considered a national embarrassment from the face of the earth. Austrian photographer Stefano Kleinowitz visited the camp three times in the latter half of 2015, observing as it expanded in size, in population and in the minds of the countries on whose doorstep it lies. BJP asked him about the experience: “I didn’t know what to expect. I didn’t know if people spoke English, if they’d be friendly, what I would eat or where I would sleep “Fortunately …

2016-01-27T16:11:01+00:00

Paul Thulin’s Pine Tree Ballads

In the early 1900s, Paul Thulin’s great-grandfather settled on the coast of Maine because it resembled his homeland of Sweden. Thulin’s family has returned to Gray’s Point each summer for over a century. Runner-up in the Series category at BJP‘s International Photography Awards 2016, Thulin’s photographic sequence resonates, he says, “with a subtext of struggle and hope that mirrors my narrative sense of self and heritage.” We talked to Thulin about the creation of his stunning series: How did you first get into photography? My journey into photography started as a way to rebel against my growing contempt and frustration with the limits of language to effectively communicate. In 1996, I returned  from a stressful year of studying Philosophy in a Master’s program at Syracuse University and I remember wanting to escape into the mountains to possibly join a Zen monastery; I wanted to meditate and remain silent in an effort to really just experience the world. This desire led me to discover the writings and images of photographers Minor White, Frederick Sommer, and Emmet Gowin, …

2016-01-27T15:04:18+00:00

Ordinary Beauty: Revisiting Saul Leiter’s pioneering images

During his lifetime, Saul Leiter (1923–2013) was something of the ignored artist of American photographic history. While his career spanned a time when quintessential New York street photography was defined as swift, sharp and precise, Leiter’s leisured, impressionist style went against the grain. Leiter was a pioneer of colour photography, adventurously using Kodachrome colour slide film well before the likes of William Eggleston and Joel Meyerowitz. As the Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan wrote in Leiter’s obituary, “[his photographs] are as much about evoking an atmosphere as nailing the decisive moment.” A retrospective of the late photographer’s work has just began at The Photographers’ Gallery; the first major public show of his work in the UK features more than 100 works, including early black-and-white and colour photographs, sketchbooks and related materials.     While Leiter’s early black-and-white images were published in LIFE magazine and exhibited in New York and Tokyo, he quickly moved into fashion photography, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, British Vogue, Esquire and more. When I speak to Brett Rogers, director of the Soho gallery …

2016-02-26T16:00:03+00:00

Bill Gates sells Corbis to Getty via Chinese Consortium

Seattle-based Corbis, owned by Mircosoft-founder Gates, announced on Friday it has sold its image division to Beijing-based Chinese consortium Visual China Group (VCG) for an undisclosed amount. A wing Unity Glory will own Corbis’ images and motion archives. In a co-ordinated statement, the New York-based Getty announced it had struck an exclusive deal with VCG to license all of Corbis’ images anywhere in the world except China. Corbis was privately owned by Gates, who founded under the name Interactive Home Systems. First established in 1989, the company was born out of Gates’ belief consumers would decorate their homes with a revolving display of images mounted on digital displays. At the onset of the internet, and in some respects as a precursor to ‘the internet of things,’ Gates envisioned Corbis would deliver great art works, from across history, at a high digital level into consumers’ living rooms. That vision has not borne out, and Bloomberg News reported Corbis had been forced to cut about 15 percent of its staff in November 2015. Corbis will continue to exist under its Corbis Entertainment division, which works on product placement …

2016-01-25T18:26:35+00:00

The best of CES 2016

The new year opened with the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, and it proved rich pickings for pro photographers, with new flagship cameras from Nikon and Phase One, some welcome long-lens additions designed for CSC cameras, and the usual array of storage devices, action cams and drones. We round up the most intriguing new photography announcements. Kodak Super 8 Revival Initiative CES’s one genuine surprise came in an announcement from Kodak, stating it plans to revive the Super 8 format, 50 years after it first debuted. Showing a prototype that “combines the classic features of a Super 8 with digital functionality”, and with a new ‘limited edition’ camera planned for autumn, the company says it has devised a roadmap that includes a range of cameras, film development services, post production tools and more, in what amounts to a new “ecosystem for film”. It comes on the back of resurgence of interest in film within Hollywood, according to Kodak, and the new initiative has the backing of filmmakers including Christopher Nolan, Steven Spielberg and Star Wars writer/director JJ Abrams. Kodak is …

2016-01-25T13:06:16+00:00

Leica enters the outdoor photography market with the new X-U

Leica have just announced the Leica X-U (Typ 113), a new camera from the German manufacturer specifically designed for the outdoors and underwater. The camera, which was made in Germany in collaboration with Audi Design, is equipped with a Leica Summilux 23mm f1.7 ASPH. lens (equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format) and an APS-C CMOS sensor. Full HD video capture is also offered, with resolution of up to 1920×1080 at 30 frames per second. The camera also includes an integrated flash, placed above the lens. Leica say this X-U was created “for the adventurous photographer” and the camera has been weatherproofed accordingly – it is shock-resistant, dust-sealed, waterproofed and shatter-proof. With an aluminium top plate and high-grip TPE armouring, the camera promises excellent handling and durability that could make it an intriguing choice for those shooting action or underwater, extreme sports, travel, architectural or landscape photography. With the most arduous of projects in mind, the X-U includes a non-slip body, a toughened monitor screen cover, and a failsafe double locking system for the battery compartment …

2016-01-22T14:56:49+00:00

BJP Staff