Month: March 2016

Leica M Monochrom with Leica M-Summicron 35mm f/2.0 ASPH, 1/4,000 sec, ISO 320, handheld

John Brockliss celebrates sea at North Contemporary Fine Art Brighton

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The collective images John has assembled for his latest exhibition, at the Brighton gallery North Contemporary Fine Art, as well as a photobook, titled Restless. Leica M (Typ 240) with Leica Elmarit-M 24mm f/2.8 ASPH, 1/350 sec, ISO 200 His images, many of which are taken at sea or in the face of storms, are a personal exploration of the unique sense of space, power and light of Britain’s coastlines. Born in 1950, John is a UK photographer specialising in maritime, documentary and reportage photography. Leica M9 with Leitz Summicron M 50mm f/2, 1/3,000 sec, ISO 160, f/5.6 After studying photography, fine art and graphic design, he graduated as a graphic designer in 1972, commissioned and art directed photographers throughout his design career John now work exclusively with Leica rangefinder cameras and the light available to him at the time. The exhibition runs until April 16th. Find them at 35 North Contemporary Fine Art, 35 North Road, Brighton, BN1 1YB. The gallery is open Wednesday – Sunday 11 – 5.30pm.

2016-03-31T16:32:32+00:00

IRAQ. Albu Ajeel. February 2, 2016. 10-year-old Sara Adnan Mohamed, draws in a room in the partially burned down house that she shares with her family in the predominantly Sunni village of Albu Ajeel, on the outskirts of Tikrit. Albu Ajeel was under the control of the Islamic State until their retreat from Tikrit in the Spring of 2015.. 

Sara and her family recently returned to Albu Ajeel after being displaced to Kirkuk for almost two years. Upon their return, Sara's family found their village mostly destroyed and their home partially burned down.

In order to help Sara and other families cope, the International Committee of the Red Cross distributes food parcels to returnees and has also rehabilitated the water supply to Albu Ajeel residents.

Moises Saman on Iraq’s civil war

Moises Saman is one of the leading conflict photographers of his generation. In recent years, he has worked in Afghanistan, Egypt and Libya. But the Spanish photographer is best known for his ongoing ability to photograph the war in Iraq, first the American war with Saddam Hussein, and then their occupation of the country, and then the ongoing civil war that still besets Iraq. In 2016, 13 years after the invasion, Iraq is no closer to being a settled, secure nation.  Following the “surge” of American combat troops in 2007, a fragile ceasefire seemed to descend over the majority of the country, a peace which sustained until the last soldiers departed in December, 2011. But, when the Americans left, they also left behind unresolved problems that, after a period of relative calm, have reared again. Now he has returned to Iraq, on commission for The Red Cross, to show displaced families unable to access the most basic sanitary needs, due to their failed state and total lack of local governance. Photographing on commission for The New Yorker (for whom he has also covered the Arab Spring and …

2016-03-31T15:55:27+00:00

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BJP #7847: Shooting on Assignment

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In our latest issue, we look at what might just be the photographer’s holy grail: creative commissioned work. We’re seeing more brands take an enlightened view on imagery, allowing photographers the freedom to create cutting-edge work. It’s available to buy now. REBIRTH OF A BRAND Upon joining the brand in 2012, Kenzo’s creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon recognised that striking photography was the key to revitalising the French-Japanese brand. They look for collaborators with a strong point of view and allow their style to come through, employing the likes of Lorenzo Vitturi, Jean-Paul Goude and Synchrodogs to make cutting-edge adverts, branded content and lookbooks. The pair tell Jessica Gordon how they used photography to solidify Kenzo’s quirky new voice. “WE SAID, ‘WHAT CAN WE DO THAT WOULD INJECT SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AND OFF-KILTER AS YOU’RE FLIPPING THROUGH A MAGAZINE BUT STILL HAVE THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE BRAND WE WERE BUILDING?’”   NORTHERN SOUL Alasdair McLellan has carved out a world-class career with his elegant fashion and portrait photography, fusing references as myriad as …

2016-04-28T17:16:53+00:00

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Infinite spaces: How architectural escapes can endlessly extend into the landscape.

A new photography book by James Silverman, the Gothenburg-based photographer, seeks to demonstrate the ‘uninterrupted flow between interiors and exteriors,” he writes. “Architecture [that] is defined by elements that absorb, reflect, or deliberately break with their surroundings.’ According to a 2014 poll; clergymen, CEOs and agricultural & horticultural workers make up the top three in terms of job satisfaction. Whilst photographers do not come anywhere near the top ten, one suspects James Silverman’s particular niche – that of photographing luxury houses –  should chart well. Infinite Space is a compendium of such locales – an elegant selection of images seeking to identify and celebrate cutting-edge residential design. Silverman has spent the majority of his career in Sweden, and the country’s aesthetic style is evident in his work. Initially studying fine art at Chelsea School of Art before dropping out of a graphic design course at Manchester, the Brit discovered photography whilst journeying to India and Thailand “with a terrible point-and-shoot camera.” He reflects: ’The images were either too dark or too light […] I wanted to …

2016-03-31T12:49:57+00:00

© Cortist and Sonderegger from the series, Icons, Mking of Tiananmen_by Stuart Franklin, 1989_2013

ICONS – Works by Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger

Trawling through books filled with history’s most memorable photographs, the Swiss photography duo used optical tricks to reproduce what might seem impossible to duplicate – a series of moments that are now remembered as the most influential photographs ever taken, ones now credited with resulting in new creative and political movements or rebellions. Cortis, born in 1978, and Sonderegger, born 1980, have lived and worked in Zurich, Switzerland since 2001, and began collaborating during their studies at Zurich University of the Arts in 2005. Carefully considering the conditions in which each original image was made, the artists mimicked the same methods in their studio, using scale models and paying close attention to the lighting and vantage point of the camera. It was, they say, “an attempt to literally ‘re-make’ these events.”   Re-made images include the crash of the Hindenburg, the downing of the supersonic passenger jet Concorde, to the last photographic of the Titanic and the raising of the American flag on the Pacific Island of Iwo Jima during the fight with the Japanese during the end days of the Second …

2016-03-31T12:34:08+00:00

This is what hatred did

Cristina de Middel: Lady Isn’t Waiting

When I contact Cristina de Middel to ask for an interview, she’s in an airport. When we speak on Skype a few days later, she’s preparing for another flight later that day. When she sends us her images, she does so from a departure lounge. Talk to other photographers on the festival circuit, and de Middel is referred to with a lot of affection and a tiny bit of resentment. It’s as if they might be remembering an old friend they haven’t seen for a long time, and can’t help feeling a little rejected, a little jealous. For de Middel was, once, one of them. She was a photojournalist who no longer towed the editorial line, choosing to go it alone and focus on her own work, embracing a more conceptual approach, jettisoning the press for the art world. De Middel was hardly alone in doing this, and she was there, at the festivals, competing for attention like everyone else, necking the free wine at everyone else’s gallery launches, worrying about the bank account. Now …

2016-07-05T14:05:23+00:00

Image © Jerry Uelsmann

World Famous Photographers meet near the Arctic Circle at Nordic Light International Festival of Photography

The Nordic Light International Festival of Photography, the photo festival in the small island-city of Kristiansund, on the northern reaches of the Norwegian coastland, returns for its eleventh edition with exhibitions from international photographers including Espen Rasmussen, Ralph Gibson, Martine Poppe and Jerry Uelsmann. Nordic Light is not an especially venerated photography festival, yet it consistently demonstrates an ability to attract some of the biggest names in the business. Last year, the American photojournalist James Nachtwey visited the small Norwegian town. In years before, Kristiansund has welcomed Bruce Gilden, Bruce Davidson, Martin Parr, Gered Mankowitz and Lucien Clergue. Set in the local cinema in the centre of town, Nordic Lights’ days are orientated around lectures from an eclectic range of photography, in a town with a population of just 24,000. The festival sees around half that amount of people visit the festival for its week-long duration every year. For a festival with only a handful of full-time staff, and made possible only by a close-knit community of local volunteers, who contribute food, manpower, time and energy to the festival, its testament to the passion of the …

2016-03-31T10:40:06+00:00

Muhammad Ali – Fighter’s Heaven

In October 1974, Muhammad Ali would attempt to regain the world heavyweight boxing championship title that was stripped from him when he refused the Vietnam draft seven years earlier. He faced the undefeated George Foreman in Zaire, Africa, in the fight dubbed ‘The Rumble in The Jungle’. Only weeks before, on August 24-25, photographer Peter Angelo Simon was invited to experience the private world of the iconic boxer as he prepared, mentally and physically, for the biggest fight of his life. “Forty-two years ago, I photographed Muhammad Ali in the rural Pennsylvania sanctuary he called ‘Fighter’s Heaven’ as he prepared for the greatest contest of his career,” says Peter Angelo Simon, who has photographed on commission for the New York Times magazine, as well as exhibiting in museums and galleries internationally, including the Smithsonian. “Here was the most famous and contentious personality on the planet in his private retreat – the eye of the public hurricane – which was most of his life. While a global audience was fixated on his fate, I was able to record aspects of Ali …

2016-06-06T11:56:47+00:00

Havana, Cuba 2015. Book 'Cuba, La Lucha'.

Carl De Keyzer’s Cuba – From Communist to Capitalist Country

“I have come here to bury the last remnant of the Cold War in the Americas,” President Barack Obama said in Havana. With the speech, President Obama became the first US President to visit Cuba in almost 90 years, following the reinstatement of the diplomatic relations between the two countries. Before President Obama’s speech, which saw the relaxation of a trade embargo between the two countries that lasted 56 years, the British photographer and Magnum member Carl De Keyzer had already began to explore Cuba’s transition from a regime communist to a capitalist system, and the consequence of this change on the country’s population. The images from de Keyzer’s new book, Cuba, La Lucha, capture the unique character of the Cuban people struggling to survive in an outmoded, authoritarian system. Through crumbling buildings, we see the residue of a bygone era, as well as a population ready to open a new chapter in its history. Carl De Keyzer shows the ambivalence of a changing country, torn between the desire to preserve its traditions and the desire to improve its economy, …

2016-03-24T17:43:31+00:00

From the series Taratine Untitled 2015 C Daisuke Yokota courtesy GP Gallery 1

Leading Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota wins Foam Paul Huf Award 2016

Daisuke Yokota, 32, from Saitama, north of Tokyo, in Japan, has a long, meticulous and demanding approach to photography, the kind of work only an obsessive would embark on. Yokota, who is represented by Japanese gallery G/P, is at the vanguard of a new movement of Japanese experimental photographers. He shoots on a compact digital camera, before printing and rephotographing the images on medium-format film. He then prints and reprints, again and again, but this time using heat and light, or applying acid or naked flames to the end results. In the process, the images become distorted, warped, otherworldly. This process results in one-off prints and unique books, often published using unexpected materials. Yokota has made for a name for himself at photography festivals by staging these book-making sessions, in what amounts to public performances of photo publishing. Yokota has produced several acclaimed photobooks in this way, including Linger and Vertigo, each of which sold out over the course of the festivals in which they were launched, and are now invariably hard to find and expensive to …

2016-03-24T14:45:29+00:00

BJP Staff