International Photography Award

The International Photography Award: Past winners

© Dominic Hawgood

With less than two weeks left to enter the IPA 2018, BJP looks at what past winners of the Award did next

One of the world’s leading showcases for contemporary photographic talent, the International Photography Award’s past winners have gone on to achieve international success and recognition, becoming some of the most respected names in the industry.

Previous winners have had their work exhibited in leading galleries and museums internationally and won innumerable awards and grants, from Harvard Fellowships to the Foam Talent Award. Many of the Award’s past recipients  are now represented by leading galleries and agents, including WeFolk and Panos Pictures, and their work is held in museum collections worldwide. 

The winner and five shortlistees of the 2018 Award will receive exclusive coverage in British Journal of Photography and VIP access and promotion at Photo London. This year’s grand prize winner will also be awarded a £5000 production grant to realise their own solo exhibition at the leading London gallery, TJ Boulting.

“Winning the BJP IPA was a huge step in my career. It is a seal of approval that has raised my profile in a really big way, bringing huge exposure to my work. I am incredibly proud of it and it has given me the confidence and impetus to push my work further,” says Daniel Castro Garcia, winner of the International Photography Award 2018.

Selected for his project Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016, a powerful documentation of the European refugee crisis, in the year since winning Garcia has been the recipient of numerous awards and accolades, including a showcase at Senate House Library and Cortona On The Move. He also received the Magnum Foundation Fund 2017, which has enabled him to relocate to Sicily and develop the next chapter of this project. 

© Daniel Castro Garcia

Juno Calypso won the Series Award in 2016 with her project Joyce, a collection of performative self-portraits that reflect on “modern rituals of seduction and the laboured construction of femininity.”  

“If you know you have a great project, make sure to do a strong edit and then enter, who knows what will happen,” advises Calypso. Indeed, following her success, the photographer went on to win the 2016 Foam Talent Award and has exhibited in numerous exhibitions internationally. She is now represented by both TJ Boulting gallery and the London-based agency WeFolk. 

The Champagne Suite © Juno Calypso

© Juno Calypso

Exploring the changing cityscape of London, Felicity Hammond’s photographic collage Restore to Factory Settings, was awarded the Single Image Award at the IPA 2016. In the two years since, Hammond has been nominated for numerous awards, including Foam Talent and the Unseen Talent Award, and exhibited internationally.

“One of the most important outcomes has been the introduction of my practice to a range of curators and professionals who were not aware of it before. The award attracts a wide range of people, many of whom I have collaborated with since,” she reflects.

© Felicity Hammond

In 2015, Dominic Hawgood won the series category with Under the Influence, a conceptual project exploring the blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in the context of religious rituals. Hawgood has gone on to expand his practise to encompass a range of other mediums.

“I think it’s important to enter the IPA with ambitious work. The photographic landscape is changing fast and if both sides take risks then interesting results will follow,” he observes. Since winning, Hawgood has exhibited internationally and been shortlisted for a number of prestigious awards, including ING Unseen Talent Award, Magnum and Photo London’s Graduate Photographer’s Award and the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize.

© Dominic Hawgood

Now in its 14th edition, the International Photography Award has an even longer list of past winners who have gone on to achieve international acclaim. Previous recipients, including Chloe Dewe Mathews, Giulio di Sturco and Jane Hahn have gone on to win prestigious grants and awards, and been exhibited at leading galleries worldwide. Renowned photographer Edmund Clark won the Award in 2009 with a work-in-progress, Guantanamo Bay, and his work is now held in a number of museum collections, including the National Portrait Gallery and Imperial War Museum.

With a prestigious panel of judges and our most ambitious awards to date, the International Photography Award 2018 offers an opportunity to be recognised and celebrated by the photographic community. With only two weeks left to enter, submit now for the chance to be the winner, or one of the five shortlistees, of the 2018 Award.