Author: Ameena Rojee

10 More Young, Emerging & Established Photographers Choosing Film

Today we’re sharing another 10 photographers who choose their strongest photographs and tell us what it is exactly that brings them back to using film, time and time again. Plus, you only have a few days to enter the Intrepid Film Photography Award. The Intrepid Camera Co. is a young start-up enabling a new generation of photographers of all kinds to put down their digital cameras and embrace the world of film with their affordable large-format cameras. Scroll down to the bottom of the article to find out how to submit to the competition and win one of Intrepid’s large-format cameras – it’s free to enter and only open until Sunday 11 June, so don’t miss out! Kamil Śleszyński The Photographer I’m a former postman, Bulgarian forklift operator and autodidact documentary photographer. I live in Bialystok, Poland, where I work on long-term projects focusing on complex relationships between people. The Image This photo was taken in the Polish detention center where I was working on a documentary project about prisoners. It is one of the better frames I have made, …

2017-06-26T11:53:53+00:00

10 Young, Emerging & Established Photographers Still Using Film

And the revolution will be televised. Today, we announce the launch of the Intrepid Film Photography Award. The Intrepid Camera Co. is a young start-up enabling a new generation of photographers of all kinds to put down their digital cameras and embrace the world of film with their affordable large-format cameras. For the next few weeks, we will be sharing a series of articles showcasing the top emerging and established photographers using film today, proving that film is not dead. They choose their strongest photographs and tell us what it is exactly that brings them back to using film time and time again. Plus, scroll down to the bottom of the article to find out how to submit to the competition and win one of Intrepid’s large-format cameras – it’s free to enter and only open for a week, so don’t miss out! Lewis Khan The Photographer I am a photographer working with stills and moving image, narrative based in realism told through individuals, communities, places. The Image This is an image from a project I shot in …

2017-06-26T11:54:37+00:00

Udacity offers photographers the chance to be Virtual Reality pioneers.

In 2003, the British photographer Robbie Cooper was employed to photograph the CEO of a large business. As they talked between shots, Cooper learnt that the man had recently separated from his wife, and didn’t get much of a chance to spend time with his kids – until he found something called Everquest. Everquest was an early iteration of the 3D fantasy-themed role-playing computer games that cropped up at the turn of the millennium when multiplayer online games were really taking off. Every evening, the businessman would log onto Everquest and, through the game, spend time with his children – or at least the cartoonish, anime-style virtual avatars of his children. As they played together online, the businessman would ask them fatherly things – how their schoolwork was going, what was going on with their friends, how their mother was getting on. He was using his virtual self to compensate for the absence of his real self. Cooper says of the experience: “This emotional exchange, taking place in the fantasy of the game, got me …

2017-06-26T11:55:16+00:00

How to create a ground-breaking photobook

So you’ve thought long and hard about whether the time is right to make a photobook, and you’re sure there is an audience for your project; what’s next? If you want to make a book then you have to start physically making it, says Dewi Lewis, whose experience in publishing stretches over more than 30 years. “If someone is working on a project they are convinced is a book, my view is they should be continually putting together a dummy in its loosest sense – something where the work is sequenced,” says Lewis. “You need to see as you go where the gaps and strengths are. So it’s a case of continually printing out the images, putting them in a sequence, and living with it.” There is a lot to think about when deciding the look of your book, such as choosing which images to show, finding an effective way to translate those images to page, and refining the edit. Photographers should have their final selection of images ready and organised well in advance, advises …

2017-06-26T11:55:49+00:00

Film isn’t dead: The large format revolution is here

Of the many adjectives you could use to describe large-format film photography, affordable isn’t the first that springs to mind. But one Brighton based start-up is on a mission to change that. Hot on the success of their £250 4×5 camera, which they financed through crowdfunding, the Intrepid Camera Company has today launched their Kickstarter for an 8×10 model. Intrepid’s founder-director Maxim Grew had the idea for the camera while mid-way through an undergraduate degree in Product Design at the University of Sussex. He’d become increasingly fascinated by the format beloved of photography greats from Ansel Adams to Gregory Crewdson for its magical, contemplative process and the incredible visual quality of images it produces. However, on finding that his student loan didn’t stretch to the several thousand pounds it can cost to buy a camera, he started experimenting with building one himself. “I was making these really simple things – essentially just boxes with lenses on the end, using instant film and using photographic paper to make paper negatives,” he remembers. Originally Grew’s vision was …

2017-06-26T11:57:43+00:00

On the era of mass appropriation, and inventing new colours

Nick Thornton Jones and Warren Du Preez, the London-based experimental photographers, call their work “the de-familiarisation of surrealism”. In Immortal, their beautifully-produced new series of photobooks, the pair explore this idea with portraits of the human form shot with a dizzying intensity of colour and lights, as if we’re seeing, printed on paper, a fevered dream. “We were fed up of everything being watered down and diluted. It feels like everything’s hyper-referential,” Du Preez says of the genesis of the project when we meet in their Bethnal Green studio. “The editorial and art world can feel like a pool of brown mud to me. There’s a lack of process to a lot of art out there now and for two process junkies, that can feel quite depressing.” “It’s important to make your own stuff,” says Thornton Jones. “People don’t do that anymore; they sample everyone else’s and call it their own. They’re not inventing and making stuff. It’s an era defined by mass appropriation. So this series was born out of a sense of frustration …

2018-02-15T11:05:20+00:00

The first step to making a successful photobook isn’t what you think it is

To mark the launch of the Bob Books Photobook Award, a new competition from Bob Books, the UK based on-demand photobook printer, BJP is publishing a three-part series featuring advice on how to make and promote a photobook. In part one, publishing experts and photographers who’ve successfully made the journey share invaluable advice on what to think about before diving in. Producing a photobook is an important milestone in any photographer’s career, demanding a huge investment of time, energy, and resources. With so many photobooks being published every day and the bar to entry lower than it has ever been, how do you make a book that does your project justice, stands out from the rest, and most importantly sells? Publisher Dewi Lewis, who has been in the industry for more than 30 years and has worked on books with photographers including Martin Parr, Edmund Clark, and Stuart Freedman, says the starting point has to be for every photographer to ask why he or she wants to make a book. “Not enough photographers ask themselves …

2017-06-26T11:59:00+00:00

Wheelies, balaclavas and broken bones: welcome to UK BikeLife

A 13-day coma, four brain haemorrhages, a fractured cheekbone, a broken collarbone, a broken humerus, two collapsed lungs, several broken ribs, a cracked pelvis, a dislocated knee a shattered foot, an amputated toe and a splenectomy. After a near-fatal accident leaves you with this catalogue of injuries, you might consider a more gentle hobby than dirt biking. Not Izzy, one of the die-hard dirt bikers who features in Spencer Murphy’s new book, Urban Dirt Bikers, published by Hoxton Mini Press and launched today. “Izzy got back on [his bike] at the first opportunity – albeit with a newfound respect for safety. He continues to perform stunts and is one of the most controlled and skilled riders I’ve met. That kind of dedication, to me, demands respect,” says Murphy, whose series celebrates the prowess, passion and style of a secret and often stigmatised subculture. “People don’t look back on the career of Evil Knievel and think of him as a menace – nor do they of any extreme sports person that risks life and injury in …

2018-02-14T17:17:00+00:00

BJP Staff