Author: BJP

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Photokina News: Introducing Sony’s new full-frame camera

Sony has introduced a new flagship SLT using the company’s A mount, breathing some new life into a system that many thought was finished. The new a99 ll will be a full-frame camera that features a 42-million-pixel sensor, and which will be capable to shooting at an incredible 12fps at full resolution. The company has developed a new hybrid AF system that combines 399 on-sensor contrast detection points with a standard phase detection system that features 79 cross type sensors. The result, Sony says, is a system that is both fast and accurate, which covers a very wide area of the viewfinder and which can operate at brightness levels of -4EV. The sensor in use is a newly developed unit that uses backlit technology to maximise the amount of light getting to the pixels and which replaces aluminium wiring with copper to speed up transmission and to enhance the camera’s ability to move data. The maximum ISO speed will be 102400, and the in-body 5-axis IS system will offer up to 4.5-stops of stabilisation. The …

2016-09-26T11:18:54+00:00

George Melly (c) Brian Griffin

Meet the experts: Offspring returns to east London

BJP

Martin Parr is the headline speaker as Offspring Photo Meet returns to east London later this month for its third – and most ambitious – edition yet. Its new venue at Space Studios in Hackney will host two days of talks, seminars, networking events and portfolio reviews with industry experts, kicking off on 16 May (ahead of Photo London art fair, which runs 19-22 May) with a workshop led by legendary portrait photographer Brian Griffin, and finishing off in the evening with Parr’s ‘Photobiography’. The following day concludes with Gary Cohen’s Photo Quiz, prizes for the best portfolios, and a party. Portfolio sessions run throughout the event from 10am to 6pm on both Monday and Tuesday, with experts drawn from the worlds of editorial, commercial and fine art practice. Reviewers include Andrew Sanigar, commissioning editor for Thames & Hudson books, Aine Donovan, production director and partner at BBH, Kate Edwards, picture editor at The Guardian Weekend Magazine, gallery director Katrin Weber of Galerie f5,6 in Munich, curators Kim Knopper (Foam), Karen McQuaid (The Photographers’ Gallery) …

2016-05-05T10:40:22+00:00

How London’s new buildings show how the city is facing terminal decline

Cities are places of constant change. It’s the nature of them, and it’s what makes them attractive. But not all change is equal; change can be organic, but it can be pernicious and abnormal. London has always been a city in flux. But, for anyone living in London, the transformations of the past few years are impossible to ignore. Huge swathes of the city have been redeveloped, remarkable buildings demolished, long-standing communities displaced. This current period of activity is unique, for it is is undoing many of the things that make the city unique. As social housing becomes luxury flats, as their inhabitants are forced out to the suburbs, the inner zones of the city become ever more homogenous, expensive and dull. This issue is what underlies Metropole, a project that aims to visualise the changing skyline of London, to imagine how the city will come to look in the future and, most importantly, seeks to recreate the sensation of feeling lost in a city that was once familiar. It’s a project partly inspired by the city symphony movies of the 1920s, films …

2016-02-12T11:21:43+00:00

Leica SL (Typ 601)

Exclusive test: first impressions of Leica’s brand new professional system camera

BJP

In a world where we expect quite different things from a compact system camera and a single lens reflex camera, it might seem a little odd to name one of the former in remembrance of one of the latter. But perhaps we need to learn not to expect the expected from Leica – a company that seems to ignore what the rest of us consider logical. The new Leica SL (Type 601) is indeed a mirrorless camera, much in the style of the Olympus OM-D, the Panasonic GH and the Fuji X-T bodies, but while other brands do all they can to distance themselves from the ‘old fashioned’ SLR, Leica seems to be embracing it. By using the name ‘SL (Type 601)’, Leica suggests that this 2015 body is in some way a descendant of the Leicaflex SL – a film SLR born in 1968 that in turn fathered the R3 in 1976. The camera is substantial indeed, lacking all hints of the miniaturisation that we have come to associate with compact system cameras. None-the-less, …

2015-10-20T18:14:31+00:00

Johanna Neurath of Thames & Hudson (in yellow), and photographer George Georgiou (in black) giving reviews at Offspring Photo Meet earlier this year. Image (c) Mimi Mollica.

Ask the experts: Offspring Photo Meet returns to east London in late October

BJP

More than 40 of the country’s leading photography experts are being assembled over two days late next month in east London to give tailor-made feedback and advice to professional and aspiring image-makers looking to take their careers to the next level and find new markets for their work. Among them are curators, picture editors, ad agency creatives and publishers, from companies and institutions such as Tate Modern, The Guardian, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and Thames & Hudson, tasked with giving attendees an honest assessment of their work through one-to-one portfolio reviews. Participants will also learn about the dynamics of the contemporary photography market, coming  away with ideas about how to get their work in front of key decision makers, and what impresses them, gaining insights from professionals working at places such as Magnum Photos, The Photographers’ Gallery and FT Weekend Magazine. Returning to The Proud Archivist in Haggerston on the last Friday and Saturday of October, Offspring Photo Meet includes two days of portfolio reviews along with talks by multi-award-winning photographers Zed Nelson and Hélène Binet, both …

2015-10-23T16:02:20+00:00

Gareth McConnell’s young hedonists the morning after a night in Ibiza

“All these fucking photographs,” says Gareth McConnell at the very beginning of our conversation. “What do you do with them? How do you make sense of them?” It’s taken weeks to connect. The Irish-born, London-based photographer has given me the runaround, but he’s so engaging and funny when he finally replies that I find it hard to maintain any strop. “I am gonna look for PDFs now,” he writes. Then: “I have neither copies of the books or money for a courier if I did… why didn’t I pay more attention at school?” He’s much like this in conversation: frequently self-deprecating, easy-going, often cheeky. He also talks nineteen to the dozen, weaving punk bands, AK-47s, Tommy Hilfiger, Susan Sontag and Carl Cox into his conversation as easily as his publishing venture (Sorika), his daughter, and his long-time battle with drug addiction. At the end of it all, I find myself wondering what on earth just happened. McConnell came to international attention with the publication of his first book, a short-lived collaboration between Steidl and Photoworks, …

2015-06-09T11:58:01+00:00

Lars Tunbjörk – obituary

Lars Tunbjörk, the renowned photographer best known for his vividly colourful, quietly witty photography of everyday life in Sweden, died this month aged 59, writes Thomas Cox. Tunbjörk was one of Sweden’s most celebrated photographers. Headlines from Swedish media publications included epithets like “Lars Tunbjörk changed the way we see ourselves” (Sweden Radio) and “Lars Tunbjörk showed Sweden through his own melancholy” (Dagens Nyheter). Born February 1956 in Borås, in the south of Sweden, Tunbjörk was 15 when he started taking photographs during work experience at his local newspaper Borås Tidning. After school, he began freelancing for the national newspaper Stockholms-Tidningen, before the fine art photography world first recognised his work with the Swedish Picture of the Year award for a black and white documentary picture of Swedish everyday life. Tunbjörk’s international breakthrough came in 1993 with the book Country Beside Itself. His best-known series include Office (2001), which captures office workers in unexpected positions while working – such as under the desk – and Home (2003), in which minimalist shots of everyday things – playgrounds, flowers, armchairs – expose a quiet …

2015-04-21T17:12:11+00:00

Kalpesh Lathigra – Lost in the Wilderness

BJP

Growing up, photographer Kalpesh Lathigra was always the Indian, never the cowboy. “As a kid you have such simplistic notions of identity,” he says. “I’m of Indian decent, but in playground games of Cowboys and Indians, no distinction was made between Indians from the subcontinent and Native Americans”, he explains. “What’s more, I always wanted to be the cowboy. I wanted to be the hero; maybe that’s why I’m so romantic about cowboys to this day.” This “slow burn of consciousness” — how childhood experiences embed themselves in our adult lives — is a point of departure for Lathigra’s new series Lost in the Wilderness. Inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson’s book India, Lathigra left a law degree to study photography at the London College of Communication. Having worked for many years as a staff photographer for The Independent, he had an epiphany in October 1999. “I was driving along the Strand past the Royal Courts of Justice and saw a group of photojournalists outside. I thought: ‘I don’t want to be doing that when I’m 40’. …

2015-04-21T15:14:12+00:00

© Jessica Fulford-Dobson

Jessica Fulford-Dobson – Skate Girls of Kabul

BJP

In 2007, an Australian skateboarder called Oliver Percovich decided to give girls from the most autocratic and repressive societies the opportunity to skateboard. He took Skateistan to Kabul, Afghanistan, using the urban street sport as a tool for empowerment, and a hook to get children aged 5 to 18 from poor and displaced Afghan families into full-time education. It now works with over 400 children per week. Pictures of them are now on display at London’s Saatchi gallery. In a country where girls aren’t allowed to ride bikes, and where only 20 percent of women aged 15 to 24 are literate, Skateistan has made skateboarding the most popular sport for girls. “I think initially when Oliver the founder turned up in Kabul with three skateboards, he was like the pied piper – he’d lend them to children and have to wrestle them back because they were enjoying it so much,” explains Jessica Fulford-Dobson. Since its beginnings, Skateistan has established the two largest sports centres in Afghanistan and opened centres in South Africa and Cambodia. Fulford-Dobson, the celebrated British portrait photographer, heard of Skateistan one lazy …

2015-04-17T15:55:12+00:00

BJP Staff