Author: BJP Intern

Eyeballing 1970s Citizens Band Radio culture

“It was before mobile phones, before the internet. It was the initial form of mass communication, a way you could chat to your friends for free. I remember lots of people in Suffolk got a CB radio and thought they were in the Dukes of Hazzard,” says David Titlow, whose latest photobook is a collection of portraits that bring together CB users and their Eyeball cards, their would-be business cards promoting their radio personality.

2017-09-18T11:02:42+00:00

Photographic idols for the Vice photo issue

When George Pitts died earlier this year, Vice photo editor Elizabeth Renstrom was struck by how much he had influenced her work and her approach to photography. Deciding the theme for this year’s photo issue seemed a natural progression: Idols. The issue presents up-and-coming photographers alongside the more established names that have made a big impact on their craft.

2017-10-05T12:07:46+00:00

Deprivation and community in Thatcherite Britain with Tish Murtha’s Youth Unemployment

“Tish believed that photography was an important form of visual communication that could stimulate discussions about real life situations and captured accurate records of the world we live in. She was trying to force people to look at the truth and learn from it,” explains Ella Murtha, the daughter of the documentary photographer. In honour of her mother’s memory, Ella has put together a new photobook, Youth Unemployment, which gathers Tish Murtha’s work photographing poverty-ridden communities in Newcastle in the 70s and 80s. Raw, powerful and emotional, Murtha has captured youngsters trying to survive turbulent economic times, when they had limited prospects – something which has recently come full circle as a new generation has had to deal with the global financial crisis.

2017-11-06T15:17:01+00:00

The story of Japanese photobooks, from 1912-1990

“There was Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the American occupation but also the uprising of students and farmers against the seizure of land for Narita Airport. It all unleashed the desire of the young generation to say that they had enough,” says Manfred Heiting as he introduces The Japanese Photobook. In a century of vast changes, from traditions to technology, empire to war, the photobook became an institution in its own right in Japan, documenting the history of the country as it happened.

2017-08-25T15:33:54+00:00

Opening closed doors in Vincent Ferrané’s Milky Way

“I have simply seen breastfeeding as an act of life and love that is not always an easy task, and that therefore is deserving of encouragement in its all dimensions, psychological, physical and social,” says Vincent Ferrané, whose photobook Milky Way is a testament to his wife and women everywhere as they begin their lives as mothers. The series focuses on breastfeeding, a natural act that can sometimes cause controversy when brought into the public sphere. Ferrané’s photobook hopes to move past that and reclaim the breast as an empowering part of the female body.

2017-10-05T12:06:39+00:00

Britt Lloyd takes Martine Rose’s AW17 collection back to its roots

“The idea was why don’t we go back to the market and put these clothes back in their home, back where they came from,” says Britt Lloyd, a young fashion photographer from North London. Working in digital photography for Showstudio, Lloyd has recently collaborated with Martine Rose and Machine-A to shoot a captivating menswear range which speaks to the communities of Seven Sisters and North London. Lloyd’s bold series does not follow traditional stylings of the male fashion industry, which she believes needs to change quickly.

2017-10-05T12:06:04+00:00

Daniel Gebhart De Koekkoek’s jumping cats keep him on his toes

Cats may have nine lives, but since curiosity killed the cat it’s probably a good thing. All these cats have been caught mid-jump, flying through the air by photographer Daniel Gebhart De Koekkoek. These seemingly acrobatic feats see our agile pets leaping across entire rooms, suspended before they come back down to earth. An entertaining series that taps into the popularity of the jumping photograph phenomenon.

2017-08-18T15:33:02+00:00

Rifles, surveillance and civilians in Kratsman’s The Resolution of the Suspect

“I have to be scared, because the moment I’m not scared it might be dangerous.” Miki Kratsman has found himself in a number of difficult and dangerous situations over the course of his 33 year career photographing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In that time, he has repeatedly changed his approach to create different narratives, showing not only the danger in the region, but those brave enough to stand up to the attacks, the pernicious nature of surveillance and latterly creating a Facebook community to share news of what has happened to the subjects of his photographs.

2017-11-06T15:18:33+00:00

Humble Cats makes the case for our furry friends as serious subjects

The internet is used for millions of things by billions of people on a daily basis. More important than the latest news update though is our obsession for cats and the proliferation of feline-based jokes knows no bounds. In a new photobook, Humble Cats, Jon Feinstein hopes to move beyond just the meme-based disposable photos of our furry friends and see what potential these companions have to inspire artistic photographs.

2017-08-11T15:38:11+00:00

Terje Abusdal wins the 2017 Leica Oskar Barnack Award

The Forest Finns, an officially recognised minority culture in Norway, arrived in the Finnskogen area in the early 17th century, bringing their traditions to the remote forests.Terje Abusdal’s series, Slash and Burn, which has now been named the winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2017, reveals their customs and questions identity and migration in the region.

2017-08-10T15:53:44+00:00

BJP Staff