Author: Charlotte Harding

Harley Weir’s Coming of Age at FOAM

The magnitude of Harley Weir’s success is unparalleled compared to most photographers of her age. At 27-years-old, her work has already graced the pages of AnOther, i-D, Dazed, Pop, The Gentlewoman and British Vogue. She has shot campaigns for the some of the biggest names in the fashion industry, and just produced a series of short films about creative women for Chanel and i-D’s Fifth Sense project. When Weir recently revealed her debut book Homes, containing photographs she had taken immediately before and during the clearing of the Calais Jungle, it sold out within a number of days, raising over £10,000 for La Cimade, a French charity committed to protecting and defending the human rights of refugees and migrants. The images, both disturbing and beautiful, show Weir’s commitment to the personal, shelters cobbled together with wood, rope and tarpaulin are transformed by her lens into dreamlike structures, imbued with a homely tenderness not often equated with the now dismantled refugee camp. Weir’s intimate approach is what marks her work in any context, be it a border zone …

2016-12-19T11:56:48+00:00

Bex Day photographs gender fluidity in the UK’s older trans community

‘Hen’ translates as a gender-neutral pronoun in Swedish, and is intended to move beyond the binary for those who identify neither as male or female. Hen is also the title of photographer Bex Day’s forthcoming project, which focuses on the older generation in the UK’s trans community. Featuring 50 subjects over the age of 40, Hen tells personal stories and investigates the common themes of loss and discovery that unite its subjects. A deliberately empowering study of individuals often placed at the fringes, it records both light-hearted and disquieting experiences they have had. “When I was younger everyone thought I was a boy and my brother was a girl,” says Day. “My parents never told me ‘You’re a girl so you should dress in pink’; I really wasn’t a stereotypical girl, I was quite boyish and as I got older I felt more and more displaced. “I think, particularly within the trans community, that feeling of displacement can be quite prevalent as well. There’s something about not fitting in, and not succumbing to stereotypes.” Day found potential participants for Hen through online forums, and formed close friendships …

2016-11-24T16:10:41+00:00

Evoking the symbolism of seafaring legacy

Over thousands of years, the tattoo has been etched into the global imagination, absorbed into every culture, marking the art form’s innate permanence as the ultimate emblem of pride, identity and rite of passage. In his latest series, Everlasting, photographer Tom Brannigan captures the symbolic spirit of the practice, focusing on the roots of body art in maritime history. The work takes inspiration from traditional sailor tattoo designs, employing a playful and at times tongue-in-cheek approach. Brannigan carefully constructs still-life photographs from objects he has collected, to evoke the imagery adopted by seafarers as mementos and talismans that primarily served a superstitious purpose among those living an unpredictable, and often risky, lifestyle. Images of swallows, skulls, daggers, hearts and roses are constructed predominantly with mass produced, toy-like props to reference the often stylised and cartoon-like nature of this genre of tattoos. “I’ve been fascinated by tattoos ever since I was a kid,” says Brannigan. “I’m interested in the language and symbolism of tattoos, and how a design becomes almost a cultural icon when it is repeated over time.” “Everlasting started out of a love …

2016-11-23T16:45:57+00:00

Chantal Webber, founder of Webber Represents, on how to win the IPA

BJP

Now a renowned creative agency with offices in London and New York, Webber Represents includes on its roster a group of contemporary and emerging photographers – as well as stylists, set designers and art directors – who are helping to define the future of the medium at its most cutting edge. Chantal Webber became an agent at the age of 20. She started out with the creative collective Tomato and then as picture editor for fashion magazine i-D. She opened Webber Represents’ New York office in 2006, and has built a reputation for representing photographers who balance active art and commercial careers. Recalling on the emerging phase of her own career as a photography agent, Webber says: “In my early 20s, I worked briefly for an agent but didn’t really enjoy the process of trying to sell work that I had little or no connection with. I then started assisting a group of photographers who shared a studio, and as there weren’t many photo agents back then this progressed into me showing their work to people and meeting …

2016-11-28T11:28:40+00:00

BJP Staff