Author: effiep

‘I wanted to show the joy of life’: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Yolanda Y. Liou is a self-taught photographer who began taking photographs in 2011 while backpacking through Europe, after her mum gifted her with a digital camera. Having had no initial intention of becoming a professional photographer, three years later she stepped into fashion photography. Despite it being challenging and competitive at times, Liou is constantly enchanted by the world of photography, and her work has been featured in GQ, Marie Claire, Elle and Grazia. Having moved to the UK seven years ago, Liou has been struck by her sense of belonging, particularly in the capital’s vibrant and exciting fashion industry. Her portrait is an attempt to show people the Britain she sees; full of people, laughter and opportunity. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Po Tseng Ho is a hair and makeup artist. The first time we met was while shooting an editorial about diversity. He was the hairstylist on the shoot and we immediately got on very well. He has …

2018-05-08T10:11:21+00:00

A Portrait of Survival: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Matt Hussey’s portrait is of a woman named Taya. Having met Taya through a friend, Hussey was struck by her determination to turn a history of abuse into an empowering and meaningful future. The portrait Hussey and Taya created together evokes rebirth and survival, incorporating water as a symbol of peace and renewal, but also of danger and uncertainty. Taken from an ambitious personal project called ‘The Photographer’s Journey’, Hussey’s portrait of Taya was shot as part of a self-imposed challenge to photograph someone every day for a year. Two and a half years later, Hussey is still working on that project, and now has hundreds of portraits to show for it. Specialising in portraiture, with a focus on environmental and documentary portraiture, Hussey seeks to incorporate people’s environments into his work, with a look to take a wider view of his subjects’ identity, both literally and figuratively. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? The portrait is of a woman named …

2018-05-04T16:19:54+00:00

Photo London: ‘Buy works that excite, interest or provoke thought’

Crane Kalman Brighton opened in 2005, and is helmed by director Richard Kalman, who once described photography as the 21st century’s most collectable art form. The gallery provides an affordable introduction for anyone interested in buying or collecting photography, selling a vast range of work, from new prints by young local talents to those by some of contemporary photography’s leading names. Beyond the top end of the spectrum, photography is still a fledgling market, and is yet to fully develop in the UK in particular. We spoke to Richard Kalman about how to navigate this young market, and where to begin if you are looking to invest. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? The most exciting thing for me is to see the sheer number of visitors to the Fair, and the genuine enthusiasm and interest the audience has in photography. Although Photo London is now really in its stride in its 4th year, it’s worth remembering that this is still a relatively new offering and that for many …

2018-05-15T13:04:18+00:00

Photo London: ‘Can art be used as a vehicle to inspire change in society?’

Rubber Factory is a contemporary art gallery on New York’s Lower East Side, focusing on conceptual photography that challenges the boundaries of the medium. The gallery opened in 2016, a first for director Mike Tan, who lovingly named it after his family’s rubber factory in Malaysia. Tan works against the book. His curatorial vision seeks to make visible the processes that underpin the making of the artworks, by engaging stakeholders in the photographic community. Tan nurtures personal relationships with artists, and is always looking to support traditionally underrepresented groups in the art world and artists working towards social change. One of Rubber Factory’s initiatives is holding monthly sessions where both emerging and established photographers can present and talk about their works in progress. As a relatively new gallery exhibiting at Photo London this year, we spoke to Tan about developing Rubber Factory’s photographic collection, and his focus on bringing boundary-pushing artists to the fair. What excites you most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? As a gallerist, having the chance to showcase our artists …

2018-05-15T13:08:22+00:00

A Portrait of Resilience: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Vikram Kushwah’s portrait is of his friend’s teenage daughter, Jasmine, who is in her second year of cancer treatment. Inspired by his wife, who also had cancer in her teens and lost her hair, Kushwah’s aim for the image and wider series was to give Jasmine a sense of empowerment. Indian-born Kushwah initially studied fashion at University, before taking a photography module that got him hooked on taking pictures. Kushwah decided from there that he wanted to be a photographer. His work encompasses both art and fashion photography, and he has been featured in several high-profile exhibitions, such as Vogue Italia’s Best of PhotoVogue, and the recent Association of Photographers AOP50: Images that Defined an Age. He also received bronze at the Young Lions’ Award in the Best Photography category at Cannes. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Jasmine, my subject for the photograph, is the 14-year-old daughter of a friend. She is in her second year of cancer treatment. Prior …

2018-04-27T14:05:50+00:00

Portrait of Britain: Diversifying the Traditional Group Portrait

Frederic Aranda is a photographer specializing in group portraiture. His work has twice been selected for Portrait of Britain, with both his winning images standing out for their dramatic feel and quirky composure. Aranda works against the grain. His images shirk traditionally hierarchical, staid forms of group portraiture, and aim for naturalism and diversity. Aranda was born in Switzerland but moved to the UK twenty years ago, initially to study Japanese at Oxford. A completely self-taught photographer, Aranda has since worked for a number of high-profile publications, including Vanity Fair and Vogue. He has also been shortlisted by The Times as Young Photographer of the Year, and his first photobook, Electric Fashion, was published by Skira in 2015, and launched at the V&A. Since being selected for Portrait of Britain, Aranda has won first prize for editorial in the Swiss Photo Award, for his portfolio of group projects. How did you create the selected portraits that you entered into Portrait of Britain 2016, and what are the stories behind them? I had two images selected: …

2018-04-25T09:58:05+00:00

A Portrait of our National Health Service

Lewis Khan is a London-based photographer and filmmaker specialising in social documentary. Since graduating from UWE in Bristol, where he studied photography, he has won the 2014 Shuffle Film Festival Short Film Prize for his moving portrayal of George, a man living on the fringes of South London. He has also worked on commissions for a number of well-respected publications, including the FT Weekend Magazine. Khan’s photograph that was selected for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts his subject, Gina, in an operating theatre after performing surgery. The portrait was taken during Khan’s time as Artist in Residence at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. During this residency, he produced a series called ‘Our NHS’, which documented the experiences of staff and patients at the hospital. The images seek to capture the emotional impact of a life spent working in the NHS, particularly during this time of difficulty within the service. Gina’s portrait is a compelling insight into the experiences of the doctors and nurses striving to keep the NHS on its feet.   How did you …

2018-04-16T14:11:10+00:00

There should be more dark-skinned models and self-love in the fashion industry: This week’s Portrait of Britain People’s Choice winner Thomas Morgan

Thomas Morgan’ winning portrait is of Malick Darbo, a young model just starting out in the industry. The aim for the image and wider series was to highlight the beauty of dark skin, which has been underrepresented in the fashion industry for many years. Thomas maintains a particular interest in fashion photography. Since being given his first DSLR camera on his 17th birthday, he has spent time curating shoots with his family and friends. In 2016, he arranged a shoot with a friend he thought could be a model. Off the back of those images, his friend got signed to a modelling agency, and Thomas was invited to test shoot and build up portfolios for new models, giving him room to experiment with style and technique. Being selected as our People’s Choice Weekly Winner is the first public recognition Thomas has received for his work. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? For a while I have wanted to do a series …

2018-04-03T16:46:48+00:00

Winner of the BJP International Photography Award 2018 Announced

The winners of the International Photography Award 2018 are Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter & Tobias, who have won with their series The Merge, an in-depth exploration into artificial intelligence and robotics, which aims to explore and visually interpret the possibility that we are living inside a simulation. Having shared a studio but worked separately for several years, Sara, Peter and Tobias came together to start a collaborative creative studio in 2013. “Coming together gave us room to experiment,” Sara explains. “We each wanted to move away from the conventional shape and form of documentary or editorial photography. Then we realised that if we wanted to do things differently, and wanted something different to happen, we needed to do everything differently, so we came together as a collective.” Since forming their collective, Sara, Peter and Tobias have made a name for themselves with their first project and photobook, Phenomena. This debut project was an anthropological study of UFOs and extraterrestrials, and was exhibited at Rencontres d’Arles and nominated for Prix de la Photo Figaro. It introduced …

2018-05-01T11:08:19+00:00

Portrait of Britain People’s Choice: I think my portrait records something a little more potent than all the selfies that clog up my sister’s iPhone

Josh Adam Jones is a Photography student at UWE in Bristol. Last year, his ongoing series, ‘99 Peace Walls’, was published on BJP. The project was made up of portraits of young people living in Belfast, a city that is still healing its old political and religious wounds. Josh’s interest in social documentary has developed in his last two years of studying. His People’s Choice portrait of his younger sister was taken as a test for an upcoming trip to Muscat, Oman, where Josh will be shooting expatriate communities. Josh has always considered community and family dynamics when shooting, and the portrait of his sister reflects both his pride in her, and a sibling spat; his sister Leah hates the portrait. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? I entered a number of portraits into Portrait of Britain this year – a selection of stand alone images as well as work from my ongoing series ‘99 Peace Walls’, which was published on …

2018-04-03T16:51:16+00:00

BJP Staff