Author: Simon Bainbridge

Fujifilm GFX 50S with GF 63mm lens f/2.8

Introducing the Fujifilm GFX 50S

Fujifilm’s ‘development announcement’ of a compact medium format camera using mirrorless technology was one of the major talking points at last year’s Photokina trade show. Not that there was any real doubt it going into full production, confirmation of which came today, with the promise that it will be in UK stores by late February. The GFX 50S uses a customised version of the 43.8×32.9mm Sony 51.4-megapixel sensor seen elsewhere, making the most of its 3.69m-dot electronic display to offer a vari-angle viewfinder that flips and rotates for all-round viewing. The body is very much like the X Series, and is able to use a similar short flange-back design for improved lens-to-sensor transmission. It weighs 1230g when paired with a standard lens (GF 63mm f/2.8 R WR), which Fuji claims is nearly a third less than current MF cameras with a similar size sensor, and more comparable to a 35mm format DSLR. We were told last September that the price was going to make headlines; Damien Demolder guessing that it would be “significantly less than …

2017-01-24T11:33:17+00:00

Portrait (c) Simon Menges.

Creative Brief: Carmen Brunner

Having assisted Wolfgang Tillmans for a year after studying photography at Kingston University, Carmen Brunner returned in 2008 to become his photo editor and publications manager. Last year she went out on her own as a Berlin-based visual consultant and freelance photo editor, working on a major redesign for Geo and continuing as director of photography on Dummy magazine, which she took on in 2011. A year later she took on the same role at Fluter, a magazine aimed at young people and distributed free, created for Germany’s Federal Agency for Civic Education to “open up complex topics to first-time voters by giving them high-quality journalism and different perspectives”. Recent themes have included migration and integration. How does working with an artist compare with photo-editing? Both revolve around complex content – understanding the artistic concept of a show or a book, or the mission statement of a magazine, and thinking within that logic while bringing my own ideas to the table. What did you learn from Tillmans? I really enjoy seeing the world through Wolfgang’s …

2016-10-21T15:44:54+00:00

Fujifilm GFX 50S

Photokina News: Introducing the Fujifilm GFX 50S

Fujifilm has announced that it will introduce a new medium format system in 2017 called GFX. The company has shown a GFX 50S mirrorless camera body, and says that by the end of the first year the system will have a range of six GF lenses. The GFX 50S will use a customised version current 51.4MP medium format sensor, measuring 43.8×32.9mm. With a flange back of just 26.7mm, it can get its rear elements as close as 16.7mm to the sensor to maintain almost parallel light rays that will interact with the pixels without producing vignetting or false colour – as it does with the X series. The company chose the mirrorless route to allow it to create a small body – it says the GFX 50S is smaller than a pro full frame DSLR to maximise resolution by avoiding the disruption of mirror vibrations. The camera instead uses a focal plane shutter that allows speeds of up to 1/4000sec. The camera will feature HDMI out and will be set-up for tethered shooting by the time …

2016-09-20T12:17:14+00:00

Phase One IQ1 100MP

Photokina News: 100 megapixels for less

Medium format camera manufacturer Phase One has added its 100-million-pixel sensor to its IQ1 ‘no frills’ camera back line-up. The sensor is the same one used in the IQ3, but the back itself lacks some elements of functionality and menu options. The principle difference between the IQ3 and IQ1 back is that the IQ1 model doesn’t have wifi or HDMI connections, and can’t power share with the battery in the body of the XF camera. Furthermore, the IQ1 model lacks a number of the information displays that the IQ3 back provides, such as exposure maps and exposure clipping, and also is unable to shoot in live view mode. The new back will come in fittings for the XF camera as well as in H for Hasselblad H models. While Phase One offers a ‘free’ lens to the value of €5990 with XF bodies bought with an IQ3 back, the offer doesn’t apply to those buying an IQ1 back. The company has also added wideangle and moderate telephoto lenses to its premium Blue Ring series. The Schneider Kreuznach 45mm …

2016-09-20T13:20:55+00:00

Bowens XMS1000

Photokina News: Lighting strikes

Profoto has unveiled what is claims to be the world’s fastest monolight. The D2 is able to freeze action at up to 1/63,000s, making it faster than most high-end studio packs on the market, says the Swedish photography company. Thanks to its High Speed Sync (HSS) technology, it also boasts burst speeds of up to 20 per second, along with the ability to sync with camera shutter speeds of up to 1/8000s. Profoto says the D2 can maintain its remarkably short flash duration across the full energy range. “For a photographer, every new day is a new challenge. So for them, speed isn’t one thing – it’s many. That’s why we created the D2 to be remarkably fast in every way,” says Johan Wiberg, Product Manager at Profoto. “But the speed is not a gimmick. We truly believe that more speed allows you to be more creative and consistently take better images regardless of what challenge you face.” In a statement, the company said: “The D2 can also help to speed up workflow because it’s equipped …

2016-09-19T16:52:15+00:00

Hasselblad V1D

Photokina News: Hasselblad shows a V-style camera

Hasselblad has shown what it is calling a ‘concept’ camera that has been designed in the style of its V film camera system and which it says returns 75-million-pixel images. Shown as part of the company’s ‘4116’ 75th year celebrations the day before the Photokina trade show opens in Cologne, the V1D camera, which may or may not ever come to market, features a modular construction that allows users to place the viewing screen either on the back or the top of the body – or both – and to switch the handles from the left to right. Hasselblad has released pictures of the camera with a waist level finder as well as with a prism, and has shown it with both one and two LCD screens. The idea, it seems, is that photographers can customise the body to suit the requirements of particular jobs and handling preferences. Despite looking very much like a camera from the V system, the camera is shown mounted with the company’s XCD 45mm f/3.5 lens that is designed to be …

2016-09-19T14:19:27+00:00

Fuji unveils new flagship mirrorless camera

Introducing the X-T2, Fujifilm’s latest mirrorless camera, which will sit alongside the X-Pro2 as the Japanese maker’s top-of-the-range X-series model. While the rangefinder-style X-Pro2 is designed for “discreet documentary photography”, the more SLR-like X-T2 is best suited to portraiture, nature and sports, says Fujifilm. And to that end, it has improved on autofocus and electronic viewfinder performance, “making it more adaptable than ever before at shooting a moving subject under difficult conditions… which had previously been considered difficult with mirrorless cameras”. Arriving in September, the £1400 camera utilises a 24.3-megapixel X-Trans TM CMOS III* 1 sensor, an APS-C format module that has no low-pass filter. Coupled with an X-Processor Pro high-speed image processing engine, it is claimed to deliver the highest performance in the X range, claimed to deliver “outstanding colour reproduction and gradation of tones in both stills and videos with high ISO sensitivity and low noise”. Start-up time, shooting interval and shutter release time lag have all been improved on, while the increased processing power has bettered the autofocus, “improving the focusing performance on points of light, low-contrast objects and subjects with fine and delicate textures such as …

2016-07-06T23:55:53+00:00

GB. England. London. Oxford Street (c) Matt Stuart, courtesy Magnum Photos

Magnum Photos announces two new nominee members following its 69th Annual General Meeting

London-based street photographer Matt Stuart and 26-year-old Armenian-American Diana Markosian have been named as the latest members of the legendary Magnum Photos agency. The pair, both supported by Magnum’s current president, Martin Parr, were announced as nominee members today following the agency’s Annual General Meeting, which took place in east London last week. Nominees are invited to apply for full membership having proved themselves after a period of usually one or four years. Jérôme Sessini and Bieke Depoorter, who both became nominees in 2012, have now both progressed to full member status. Markosian is well known to BJP readers as one of the brightest new talents in the field of documentary photography, first featuring as one of our Ones To Watch in 2015. Born in Russia and growing up in California, she’s since returned to her homeland to make work, including a series of portraits of the almost grown-up survivors of the Beslan school massacre. For Inventing My Father, she created a highly charged series about finding and reconnecting with her estranged father from whom …

2016-06-28T14:08:16+00:00

Image (c) Cristina De Middel

Friday 20 May: BJP joins Photo London to present an afternoon of film screenings

British Journal of Photography is screening a day of films today (Friday 20 May) at the Photo London art fair at Somerset House. One of  highlights of the programme is a free screening of James Crump’s acclaimed documentary, Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art (2015), just released in the UK. The 72-minute film tells the story of how, in the late 1960s, a cadre of emerging New York artists sought to transcend the limitations of art. They were looking for a larger canvas to work on. Troublemakers mines previously unseen photographs to resurrect the lives of artists who made earthworks, rather than artworks, and whose creations still exist – on a monumental scale – in the desolate deserts of the American southwest. “In doing so, they thought they were going to end galleries,” says director James Crump, whose film explores how, in making works that can never be possessed as an object in a gallery, such artists stood in direct contrast to the emerging, hyper-speculative contemporary art world of the day, and, evermore so, the …

2016-05-20T10:44:34+00:00

Lost Family Portraits © Dario Mitidieri

World Press Photo: The Winners

The title of World Press Photo of the Year goes to Warren Richardson for his picture of a man and child captured by moonlight as they attempted to cross the border from Serbia to Hungary last summer. And the first places in each of the four main news categories include scenes from the shores of Lesvos, a Kurdish hospital, and the heavily bombarded suburb of Douma on the outskirts of Damascus. Announced from Amsterdam this morning, following newly introduced checks to ensure the winning images met tightened codes on image manipulation, the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 41 photographers, selected from 82,951 images submitted by 5775 photographers from 128 countries. Richardson, an Australian photographer based in Hungary, wins 1st prize in the singles category for Spot News with the same image, while the 1st prize story goes to Sameer Al-Doumy for his reportage from rebel-held Douma, which has been subject to months of heavy aerial bombardment on the back of a two-year siege. In General News, Mauricio Lima, a veteran Brazilian working on …

2016-02-22T12:09:57+00:00

BJP Staff