Author: Simon Bainbridge

Fuji's Takashi Ueno with the X-Pro2 he designed

Fuji’s second coming

Fuji X-Pro1 owners who’ve been waiting for the next generation of their neat little digital rangefinder may well be feeling a good deal older than when they first started waiting. And those who didn’t buy, deciding to wait it out for the follow up instead, might have had the feeling that it was never going to arrive. They’ve kept their hopes alive largely because the original is so nice, but it has a few things that really need fixing. It is exactly four years since Fuji launched its first interchangeable lens compact system camera, and while it has introduced a number of very attractive alternatives since then, they have been just that – alternatives. The X-Pro1 is a very distinctive camera with its rangefinder styling and its unique viewfinder, and if that is the kind of camera you like to use the X-T1 isn’t going to fill its shoes. In a market in which we might expect updates for this sort of model every couple of years, the X-Pro2 seems pretty overdue. I suspect though …

2016-02-02T13:56:57+00:00

Fuji X-Pro2

Fuji unveils the long awaited successor to its celebrated X-Pro1 camera

It’s been a long time coming (find out why in our interview with Takashi Ueno), but Fuji has finally unveiled a successor to its flagship X series camera, the Pro1, which was many people’s pick of the Photokina trade show four years ago, with its rangefinder styling, optical viewfinder and accompanying range of high quality lenses.The X-Pro2’s hybrid viewfinder remains unique in its proposition of blending optical and digital views of what is to be captured, and the £1349 camera is still the only AF digital rangefinder on the market. Appearances are deceptive, as the latest version looks near identical to its predecessor, but now it has a 24-megapixel sensor, a faster processor, and Fuji has made some much needed improvements to the autofocus, which uses 273 AF points across the screen, including 169 phase detection points.Further refinements have been made to JPEG processing, black-and-white capture, the mechanical shutter, battery efficiency, layout and menu views, and a dual SD card slot has been added. The Fujinon XF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR, equivalent to 52-609mm …

2016-01-15T11:57:01+00:00

Leica SL (Typ 601)

Introducing a brand new professional system camera from Leica, set to go head to head with Canon, Nikon and Sony

Crowning a glittering reception at Leica’s HQ in Wetzlar, attended by BJP in late October, the German maker unveiled a brand-new professional camera system, the SL. The first arrivals, the SL (Typ 601), which BJP had exclusive access to a week before the launch, and the first of three new new dedicated lenses, were due to go on sale in mid-November, aiming to compete directly with Canon, Nikon and Sony’s top-end, SLR action cameras. Employing a 24-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor “optimised for all Leica lenses”, the spec is focused on delivering speed, giving 11fps at full resolution in raw and JPEG, autofocus claimed to be the fastest among full-frame system cameras, said to work in “almost real time”, a top shutter speed of 1/8000s, and a highest ISO rating of 50,000. More significantly for many photographers though will be the lowest ISO setting – ISO 50. Hand made in Germany using two solid blocks of aluminium, the camera and lenses are dust- and spray-proof. The camera itself is packed with new technology, including an integrated …

2015-10-20T18:14:15+00:00

Leica SL (Typ 601)

Leica SL (Typ 601) and lenses: full specs and images

• Largest, fastest and highest resolution EVF (4.4-MP at 60fps / x0.8 magnification) • Fastest frame rate: 11fps at 24MP, 1080p at 120fps, 4k(UHD)at 30fps • Fastest AF in full-frame system cameras • 24-megapixel CMOS sensor: ISO 50 –50,000 for highest performance in every light condition • Best-in-class image quality with all supported Leica lenses (SL, S, R, M, T, Cine) • Fastest SD standard (UHS2) • Best video quality: HDMI out (4k10-bit 4:2:2) • Dust- and spray water-proof system • Shutter speed from 30min (bulb) to 1/8000s (mechanical) -x-Sync:1/250s • Ultrasonic sensor cleaning • Latest generation of Leica Professional user interface with hybrid touch operation • Integrated WLANand GPS module

2015-10-20T18:14:37+00:00

BJP #7837: Look and Learn

What does the perfect art college look like? The Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, profiled in our July issue (now on sale at newsagents in the UK and selected countries abroad, or via iTunes for our iPad edition, or directly from The BJP Shop), must come pretty close, with its balance of the vocational, the conceptual and a dash of the downright weird. Not to mention first-class facilities housed in a state-of-the-art building near Lake Geneva, sensibly priced course fees (€800 per term), and a workshop programme made up of visiting lectures by some of the world’s leading photographers, including Thomas Mailaender’s now legendary woodland survival course. If that all sounds a little different to your own art college experience, then how about this for a schedule: “I think something very specific about ECAL is that we are very pragmatic – we start at 8am in the morning and we finish quite late,” says Milo Keller, the photography course leader since 2012. “The students have to work really, really hard – we don’t …

2016-02-12T11:22:14+00:00

Attention all photography graduates: BJP is looking for the cream of this year's crop to feature in the projects section of our summer issues. Picture shows our August 2014 issue, featuring the work of Nottingham Trent graduate Ben Swanson (left) and Middlesex graduate Johanna Churchill (right)

Class of 2015: get your work in a special print issue of BJP

If you think you’ve got what it takes to be featured in a forthcoming special issue of BJP, and you are graduating from a higher education photography course in the UK or Ireland this summer, we want to see your work. BJP prides itself on spotting new talent, each year giving a platform to emerging photographers graduating from colleges and universities across the UK and Ireland to showcase their work with their peers and photo industry VIPs. The best we see will feature in print in our Projects section in our June, July and August summer editions, and a further number given global exposure across our online and social media platforms, reaching more than half a million people worldwide. To be considered, simply send a link to your final year work, or attach a maximum of eight low res JPEGs totalling no more than 5MB, to the editor at bjp.editor@bjphoto.co.uk. It is vital that you write into the subject line of the email, ‘Class of 2015’, and that you graduating this summer from a recognised …

2015-04-17T13:36:00+00:00

BJP #7834: Driven to Abstraction

Analogue photography is undergoing a massive resurgence right now, and the more obscure the process the better, reports Diane Smyth in the lead article for our April issue, which is devoted to process, experiment and abstraction. In London alone, there are two shows (at Tate Britain and James Hyman Gallery) devoted to salt prints made at the very dawn of the medium, and another, Revelations. Experiments in Photography at Media Space, considers early scientific imaging and its influence on contemporary artists. We talk to the curators behind Revelations, and we visit Timothy Prus of Archive of Modern Conflict to hear the thinking behind The Whale’s Eyelash, his ‘re-enactment’ of 19th century microscope slides as a ‘five-act play’ in photobook form. But it’s not just that early photographic practices are being reappraised; as the Media Space show illustrates, contemporary artists are also turning to analogue processes, and many take inspiration from the experiments and investigations conducted by photographers of their grandparents and great-grandparents generation. Smyth investigates this shift towards abstraction, talking to gallery owners, curators and …

2015-05-28T15:56:10+00:00

Ones to Watch: the new magazine from British Journal of Photography

We’re welcoming in 2015 with ‘Ones to Watch’, our annual survey of global talent, showcasing 25 photographers we believe are on the verge of something big. To discover the next generation of photography, the magazine will be available at all good newsagents from the first week of January, or available to buy direct here. Put together from more than 300 nominations by photography experts from around the world, we’ve devoted 50 pages to emerging talent drawn from Tokyo to Mexico City. Over the next 12 months, these are the photographers we are betting on to make the breakthrough from recognition in their homelands to international success. [bjp_ad_slot] This issue is all about helping them on their way and, hopefully, putting them in front of the people who can help them realise their dreams, and bringing their work to wider attention. Our aim, as ever, is to make this a truly worldwide search. However, we can’t yet say that it’s truly representative (either in terms of the world, or the major centres of photography). Among the 25 photographers we’ve …

2015-04-17T14:16:30+00:00

Taylor Wessing Portrait Photograph of the Year: Konrad Lars Hastings Titlow, June 2014 © David Titlow

David Titlow wins Taylor Wessing portrait prize

This year I think the jurors got it right. The winner of the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2014 goes to David Titlow for his picture of his baby son. Shot on the morning after a midsummer party in Sweden, little Konrad was introduced to a young dog and some assembled friends, while held (I presume) by his adoring mother. Despite the clutter of empty beer cans, it captures a beautiful moment, brought into sharp focus by the dappled light and the fixed attention of the group within this Pre-Raphaelite scene. For some, it might be a bit of a stretch to call it a portrait. But I can’t agree. Without being at all mawkish or overly sentimental (not easy when you’re photographing a mother and child), the feelings of love and joy and pride are clearly translated in the photograph. I also very much like Blerim Racaj’s Indecisive Moment, which along with Titlow’s picture and two others – Skate Girl by Jessica Fulford-Dobson, and Braian and Ryan by Birgit Püve – was shortlisted for the £12,000 prize. Taken from his series, …

2014-11-26T21:52:48+00:00

Mind Games

In November 2001, the US-led military action against the Taliban in Afghanistan appeared to be a success. The Coalition Forces were closing in on insurgents, Kabul had fallen, Kandahar was next, and the hunt was on for Osama Bin Laden, the mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks. At the end of November the international press, including The Independent, The Sunday Times and The New York Times, ran a series of news stories, complete with detailed illustrations, about Bin Laden’s secret hideaway. Bin Laden, it was reported, was hiding in a network of tunnels buried deep within the Tora Bora mountains. The network had its own ventilation system, a hydroelectric power-generating system and enough space for up to 1000 elite fighters. News of this secret lair spread and ‘the factsʼ surrounding his hideaway became incorporated into military, political and news broadcasts around the world. Bin Laden’s lair was a fictional entity, but it was presented as real, and at the time was virtually unquestioned by mainstream media. It is precisely this unquestioning attitude that Catalan photographer Joan Fontcuberta …

2015-09-30T14:55:59+00:00

BJP Staff