Author: Susanna D'Aliesio

Photobook: Tokyo is Yours by Meg Hewitt

Born in 1973 in Sydney, Meg Hewitt got into photography after studying sculpture and painting. She’s since reached the finals at the prestigious Moran Prize for Contemporary Photography and the Maggie Diaz Photography Prize for Women, and won a silver medal from the Prix de la Photographie – among other accolades – and exhibited her series Tokyo is Yours at Place M Gallery in Tokyo last year. This year, it will be shown again at the Voies Off, Les Rencontres d’Arles’ fringe festival, alongside work by her mentor, Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol. Shot in Japan over two years, Tokyo is Yours is inspired by manga, surrealism and film noir, and uses a gritty monochrome that Hewitt first experimented with back in Sydney, where she was founding director of the 10×8 Gallery from 2012-2014. “When I started shooting on film I couldn’t afford to process colour, so I would develop black-and-white film myself in the bathroom,” she says. “It was a natural progression to shoot at high ISO with a flash, and pushing the film then created part of the aesthetic. It emphasises …

2017-05-25T12:37:33+00:00

How to shoot a perfect portrait: Dan Wilton, a Portrait of Britain 2016 winner

Dan Wilton is a UK-based portrait and documentary photographer who works with clients such as The Fader, Asos, The New York Times, Adidas, Nike and XL Recordings. His portraits of Dizzee Rascal and Stormzy were both selected in BJP’s Portrait of Britain award last year, and displayed on JC Decaux screens the length and breadth of the country. BJP caught up with Wilton to find out more about his approach. What makes a compelling portrait? Too many things to list, every shoot is different. I realise the importance of patience on my part. Taking my time allows whoever I’m photographing to either engage with the process or to switch off and forget it completely – both of which I’ve found can really work with the way I shoot. It’s all about connection – about finding some kind of dialogue. Sometimes that can be hard – especially with very short shoots – but that’s one of the challenges and one of the reasons I love it so much. When did you fall in love with photography? It’s been a …

2017-05-25T10:10:33+00:00

Photo London join La Fábrica to launch the Book Dummy Award

BJP is proud to present the Book Dummy Award, a new competition run in partnership with La Fábrica and Photo London.

The award offers one winner the chance to have his or her book published, in a print run of at least 1000 copies, and have it showcased through La Fabrica’s sales catalogue, presented an exhibited at festivals and fairs such as Photo London 2018 and PHotoESPAÑA 2018, and submitted to the most important photography competitions around the world.

2017-05-24T19:36:15+00:00

Awards: Provoke wins Best Photography Book in the 2017 Kraszna-Krausz Foundation Awards

Provoke: Between Protest and Performance by Diane Dufour, Matthew Witkovsky and Duncan Forbes has won Best Photography Book in the Kraszna-Krausz Foundation’s 2017 Book Awards. A celebration of the short-lived Japanese magazine, which ran for just three issues from November 1968 – August 1969, the book gathers the ground-breaking black-and-white images published by Provoke and combines with critical theory and interviews to show how influential the publication was. Exquisitely printed by Steidl, and checking in at 680 pages, it’s a comprehensive guide to the social and political manifesto which was put together by NakahiraTakuma, Daido Moriyama and Takanashi Yutaka. Provoke: Between Protest and Performance accompanied the exhibition of the same name held at the Le Bal gallery in Paris, from 14 September-11 December 2016, co-curated by Le Bal director Diane Dufour and Matthew Witkovsky with Duncan Forbes and Walter Moser. But, as the judges made clear, it stands on its own right as a book. “The publication is the product of an extraordinary amount of work, its content is historically important, and the four-party international collaboration that brought it into being should …

2017-05-25T10:43:37+00:00

Obituary: Stanley Greene, photojournalist, 1949-2017

“You know how good a flower smells when you have smelled death,” Stanley Greene once told Clement Saccomani, the managing director of the Noor agency Greene had co-founded in 2007. A cornerstone of contemporary photojournalism and storytelling, Greene died this morning, facing his disease as he faced his life – fighting. Born in Brooklyn in 1949 to two actors, Stanley was a member of the Black Panthers and anti-Vietnam War activist as a teenager, and first got involved with art through painting. Turning to photography, he shot an epic project on San Francisco’s punk scene over the 1970s and 80s, naming it The Western Front. After meeting W. Eugene Smith, Greene turned to photojournalism, first working as a temporary staff photographer for the New York Newsday and then starting to photograph for magazines. In 1986 he moved to Paris and began covering world events. By chance, in 1989, he was in Berlin as the Wall fell. He shot an image titled Kisses to All depicting a tutu-clad girl with a champagne bottle, which came to symbolise the sense of liberation at that moment. In the early 1990s, Greene went to Southern Sudan to document …

2017-05-19T17:43:19+00:00

How to shoot the perfect portrait: Liz Hingley, a Portrait of Britain 2016 winner

“Taking someone’s portrait is always a disruptive and often very awkward event. Everyone has their default portrait pose. The role of the photographer is to push beyond, to find that mysterious intimate moment that only a camera can freeze.”

2017-05-24T15:20:34+00:00

Show: Thomas Albdorf’s General View

“The series toys with the question regarding the necessity of travelling to a place that has been photographed innumerable times, the need to record additional photographs,” says the artist. “If countless images of a specific place are readily available, has one been there already?”

2017-05-25T10:25:58+00:00

BJP Staff