All posts filed under: 1854 Media

Unseen Amsterdam announces the full details of its 2018 programme

Now in its seventh edition, Unseen Amsterdam has confirmed itself as one of Europe’s most dynamic photography events. Featuring over 300 emerging and established artists, the release of the complete 2018 programme brings together the international photography community to discuss and debate the future of the medium. Running from 21-23 September in Westergasfabriek, Unseen Amsterdam will host over 85 photographic debuts. 50 galleries from 17 countries will be present, showcasing new work from emerging artists such as Mustafa Saeed from Somaliland, whose work explores war, environment and conflict; Keyezua from Angola, who revisits clichéd representations of African women, and France’s Elsa Leydier, who examines and reconstructs exotic environments. Inez & Vinoodh (NL), Rafal Milach (PL), and Isaac Julien (UK) will also premiere unseen work over the weekend. Also present at Unseen is CO-OP, a platform for international artist collectives to present their ideas and work in new and innovative ways. In its second year, collectives involved include the Migrant Image Research Group, exploring Mediterranean migration to Europe, 280-A from Vienna who challenge the concept of …

2018-09-18T16:53:34+00:00

Maxim Dondyuk: Culture of the Confrontation

Hundreds of people crowd in the city of Ukraine, wearing helmets and holding flags, while a fire breaks out. A person in white-gloves wipes the blood off the face of a young man. Police line up with their bulletproof shields; one stands on the bonnet of a van preparing to fire his rifle. Maxim Dondyuk is a documentary photographer. His 2013-2014 project, Culture of the Confrontation, showcases perspective-shifting images of Euromaidan, the three-month long protests that erupted in Ukraine against the government, characterised as an event of major political symbolism for the European Union.

2018-09-17T12:25:18+00:00

2018 Winners of Carte Blanche Announced

In collaboration with British Journal of Photography, Paris Photo have announced 4 winning students as part of the 2018 Edition of Carte Blanche. Carte Blanche is a photographic programme, aimed at discovering talented emerging photographers and artists. For the past 2 years, it has been promoting the relationship between students and the art and photography world. Open to Master and Bachelor students throughout Europe, 4 chosen laureates have been selected by an international jury to be exhibited at Paris Gare du Nord train station, present their portfolios during Paris Photo, contribute to roundtable discussion, and gain industry exposure with gallerists, curators, collectors and artists. This years winners are Kata Geibl, Simon Lehner, Daria Minina and Daniel Szlazai. Based in Budapest and currently studying at Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Kata Geibl questions the human documentation of time, how “humanity tends to believe that history is moving forward, never repeating itself, learning from the past’s mistakes.” She believes time and history to be cyclical, and in her winning series ‘Sisyphus’, she attempts to trace humanity’s …

2018-09-11T09:44:28+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: Richard Renaldi on the glue that binds us all together

Richard Renaldi’s photography career began with a passion for drawing. But, when his high school drawing class was full, he took photography instead; the rest is history. The medium has since become one of the great loves of his life and his vast archives have culminated in his most recent project: I Want Your Love. This new work charts the many challenges and triumphs of his life and is, in many ways, an extensive self-portrait. Having always been interested in the humanist elements of photography, Renaldi’s  earlier work is rooted in portraiture, and his desire to document the many facets of American society. His project, Touching Strangers, has become symbolic of our potential to get along, and involved Renaldi asking strangers to interact with each other physically while posing together for a portrait. We spoke to Renaldi about where the idea for this project came from, the value of this unique interaction, and how far photography can go in unifying us all. Where did the idea for Touching Strangers come from? I was always interested …

2018-09-11T10:52:08+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: Veronica Sanchis Bencomo, founder of Foto Feminas, on the power of community

Meet Veronica Sanchis Bencomo, the woman behind Foto Feminas, a platform dedicated to improving the representation of female Latin American and Caribbean photographers across the globe. Growing up in Venezuela, Bencomo was always interested in Latin American photography, and particularly, in photographs by her female peers. But on moving to the UK, where she studied photography at Brighton City College, and then photojournalism at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David in Swansea, Bencomo noticed that none of these photographers had followed her across the Atlantic. Representation is everything, and throughout time, it has been notoriously difficult to penetrate the fields of art, music, and literature as a woman. Even more so if you are not from the West. For many years, Bencomo felt that the Latin American continent was too often portrayed by foreigners, and by men. “From a young age I did notice it was difficult to come across women’s works from Latin America and the Caribbean,” she says. “With Foto Feminas, my main motivation was for people to learn more about a contemporary …

2018-09-07T14:20:22+00:00

Individuality, Community, and Unity: Introducing Portrait of Humanity

As our next evolutionary step following Portrait of Britain, we are pleased to announce a global exhibition, together with Magnum Photos: Portrait of Humanity. The aim of this new initiative is to create one of the most far-reaching collaborative photography exhibitions in history. We launched Portrait of Britain two years ago, as a way to combat the divisions created by Brexit, and to build a body of work reflecting our diverse and united nation. And now, as we prepare to celebrate Portrait of Britain’s first ever book launch, we are introducing an international project to overcome our differences, transcend borders, and connect as a global community through the power of photography. “Portrait of Britain has been a phenomenon – a celebration of British culture and diversity, seen by millions of people and growing to become the most viewed photographic exhibition ever,” says Marc Hartog, CEO of 1854 Media. “Our mission now is to expand this to a global platform. Portrait of Humanity is essentially the same concept but on a global scale, asking photographers to …

2018-09-10T15:53:59+00:00

In case you missed Portrait of Britain on Sky News

Ahead of the launch of the Portrait of Britain exhibition tomorrow, Marc Hartog, CEO of 1854 Media, appeared on Sky News with one of the 100 winning photographers Tom Oldham, to discuss the largest display of contemporary portrait photography ever held. “Competitions like these are great opportunities for exposure,” says Tom, “And they offer the chance to be featured among the greatest photographers in the country.”   As a platform, Portrait of Britain is unprecedented, exposing photographers’ work both to the public and the media. And this year, we have expanded that platform to the new Portrait of Britain book and online gallery, allowing people to see all of the photographers’ images in one place. The book, published by Hoxton Mini Press gives our audience the opportunity to really see this amazing tapestry of Britain, to delve in to the rich kaleidoscope of images, and to read the fascinating stories behind each of the faces. Portrait of Britain is a celebration of our country’s unique heritage and diversity. It’s also public art on an unprecedented …

2018-09-04T13:54:56+00:00

Brian Kanagaki’s Golden Persimmons

“You should get into the habit of looking above eye-level while walking,” says American photographer Brian Kanagaki. “It’s much more beautiful than looking down at the dirty street and trash.” Golden Persimmons, shot over a period of six years, captures geometric subjects in ambiguous environments; spanning over eight countries (though predominantly New York), the brutally black and white images take inspiration from the graphic, organic shapes found in cities globally.

The project began when the design director got lost while taking a shortcut in his hometown, San Francisco. “It was funny to get lost in a city that I thought I knew so well,” he says. “I ended up driving around and finding so many new things that got my mind working.” One of which was decorative trees in people’s front gardens, the original basis for the series. But after moving to New York and spending time travelling, the idea quickly evolved to focus on tying the world together by capturing its mundane similarities.

2018-08-30T15:32:59+00:00

Meet our Portrait of Britain 2018 winners

This year marks the third annual Portrait of Britain exhibition. As much a showcase of photography as it is a celebration of our nation, Portrait of Britain is the largest contemporary portrait exhibition ever held. And for the first time since the exhibition’s inception, British Journal of Photography has produced a book in collaboration with Hoxton Mini Press, containing the 200 shortlisted entries, from which the 100 winners have been chosen. Among the winning photographs is Kovi Konowiecki’s portrait of East London twins, Dick and Clark – Kovi’s second winning Portrait of Britain image in the competition’s three-year history. In 2016, Kovi’s portrait of Shmuley, a young Orthodox Jewish boy, was also selected. “It is always cool to be a part of an exhibition with such a wide-reaching audience,” says Kovi. “Having been selected for Portrait of Britain a couple of years ago, it was amazing seeing my photograph across numerous screens and tube stations on my daily commute. It feels great to be a part of the exhibition again.” Joining Kovi in the exhibition is John Davis, …

2018-09-14T15:17:50+00:00

Group Projects: Obsolete & Discontinued

It began in March 2015 when David Yates, a client of photographer and fine art printer Mike Crawford, turned up at his print studio, Lighthouse Darkroom, with a “shopping trolleyful” of old boxes of expired photographic paper. The next day, he brought another. The two loads were what was left of a mass clear-out of Yates’ late grandfather Bret Sampson’s darkroom. The British photographer’s London studio was his first port of call, given that Crawford was already working with Yates on another of his personal projects.

2018-08-29T10:59:36+00:00

BJP Staff