All posts filed under: Archive

Maximum Exposure: The Art of Online Galleries

Online art sales topped £2.3bn in 2015, thanks in part to e-commerce platforms such as Paddle8 and Artsy, supported by venture capitalists and angel investors such as Google and other big-ticket financial backers. The platforms are a world away from traditional galleries, where high-end art sales are the preserve of private shows and relationship-building. But the increase has been so noticeable that well-respected gallerists, who have historically made their fortunes through bricks-and-mortar shows, are taking note. “I’ve been noticing an uptick in the volume of sales my gallery has made online,” says Stephen Bulger, founder of Stephen Bulger Gallery in Toronto, adding that these sales come from all over the world. In fact, one British collector, who had seen an André Kertész picture consigned by Bulger’s gallery for a show at London’s Royal Academy of Arts, contacted him online and eventually bought a print for $20,000. This got Bulger thinking, and the result is, a new e-commerce photography platform complete with virtual galleries, set to launch in November 2016. Featuring work from Bulger’s physical gallery inventory, it adds …


A Matter of Memory: Photography as Object in the Digital Age

Do you remember the last time you went out and printed a snapshot? Or filled up a chunky, leather-bound photo album with a set of family portraits? If you’re under 30, the answer could well be never. With the immediacy of digital recording and the convenience of smartphones for organising and sharing images, the act of printing physical pictures has become something of an anachronism for anyone but hipsters and art photographers. A new exhibition at the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York, seeks to address how the gradual decline of the photographic object is affecting our relationship to memory, and what happens when our century-old physical tie to the photograph is broken. “What has changed is the tactility of the photograph,” says exhibition curator Lisa Hostetler. “Now that images are on a screen, they’re sort of ‘forever young’, and it becomes difficult to realise that there are many things that connect us to the past in terms of basic human emotions. These become more difficult to tease out when everything looks contemporary.” A Matter of …


The Long Way Home by David Molina Gadea

David Molina Gadea’s The Long Way Home began when he was on a year-long placement helping out at refugee centres in Belgium. “It was a placement with the European Voluntary Service, which Britain will soon not be a part of any more because you just voted to leave the European Union,” the Spaniard tells me in a Skype interview a week after the Brexit vote. “It lasts for one year. You go to another country in Europe, you do some work there, the EU pays for your travel and stay, and you learn the language. I went to an organisation in Belgium that arranges voluntary services and training courses, and one of the things they do is volunteer at some of the many refugee camps in Belgium. So I went there as a coordinator. We did activities and helped the staff paint the centres.” “It was also about sharing and being with the refugees, who are from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and many other countries. It was about providing some distraction from the boredom of being there.” …


Erwin Blumenfeld: From Dada to Vogue

Erwin Blumenfeld proved himself to be one of photography’s greatest pioneers during his 35-year-long career, breaking new ground in formal experimentation, developing innovative concepts through his fashion shoots, and enjoying unprecedented commercial success as a result. And yet the division of his archive – some 30,000 negatives and 8,000 prints distributed among his family after his death in 1969 – has left Blumenfeld’s impressive oeuvre somewhat underappreciated in the years since. Erwin Blumenfeld: From Dada to Vogue, is the most comprehensive retrospective of his work for nearly 20 years, is aiming to change all that. Curator Lou Proud collaborated with Yorick Blumenfeld, one of the photographer’s three children, to create an overview of his extensive archive that comprises 85 works spanning portraiture, collages, nudes and fashion photography. The exhibition, at Osborne Samuel gallery in London, is subdivided in chronological order according to his own biography: Berlin, Amsterdam, Paris and New York. Blumenfeld’s entry into photography was somewhat serendipitous: in the early 1930s, while running a leather shop in Amsterdam, he uncovered a fully equipped darkroom behind a boarded-up …


Dynasty Marubi – A hundred years of Albanian studio photography

A selection of photos from the archive of the Albanian photo studio Marubi, from 1856 to 1959, showcasing three generations of photographers made studio portraits of a wide variety of people, ranging from the urban bourgeoisie, shepherds, the Ottoman emperor and King Zog, to criminals and famous actors and painters, are about to go on show at Foam, Amsterdam.


BJP Staff