All posts filed under: Awards

Philadelphia’s horsemen reclaim their heritage in Cian Oba-Smith’s shots

“It was also about reshaping that American icon: everyone thinks of the cowboy as this white American hero who has come to slay Native Americans. Actually the word cowboy is a racist term. It comes from when slave masters called all their slaves ‘boys’ and so the cow boy was the boy who looked after the cows and the horse boy was the boy who looked after the horses.” Cian Oba-Smith journeys to Philadelphia at a politically charged time during the 2016 U.S. election to meet with an infamous group of horsemen dealing with this ingrained racism on a daily basis.

2018-04-24T10:55:43+00:00

Stephen Gill, Chrystel Lebas and Dayanita Singh shortlisted for the 2018 Kraszna-Krausz

First awarded back in 1985, the Kraszna-Krausz Foundation Best Photography Book prize is one of the oldest in the business. Previous winners include Sergio Larrain (with Vagabond Photographer in 2014), Susan Meiselas (with In History in 2009), Boris Mikhailov (with Case History in 2000), and Eugene Richards (with Cocaine True, Cocaine Blue in 1994); this year three contemporary image-makers have made the shortlist – Stephen Gill, Chrystel Lebas, and Dayanita Singh. Gill has been nominated for the book Night Procession, which he self-published through his imprint Nobody Books. Shot using motion-sensor cameras in rural southern Sweden, where Gill moved with his family in 2014, the book reveals nocturnal animal activity in the dark forests. The book also includes an essay by Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgȃrd, who is best-known for his series of six autobiographies, Min Kamp [My Struggle]. Chrystel Lebas won a place on the shortlist with Field Studies: Walking through Landscapes and Archives, which is published by Dutch organisation FW: Books). Her work retraces the steps of British botanist Sir Edward James Salisbury, creating new images in the same …

2018-04-23T14:16:13+00:00

Alys Tomlinson Named Photographer of the Year in the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

The World Photography Organisation has announced the winners of the Sony World Photography Awards 2018, and the Photographer of the Year title has gone to Alys Tomlinson with her series Ex-Voto. Ex-Votos are offerings left by pilgrims as signs of gratitude and devotion, and Tomlinson’s work grew out of her interest in these markers. She shot the series at pilgrimage sites in Lourdes in France, Ballyvourney in Ireland and Grabarka in Poland, and it encompass formal portraiture, large format landscape photography, and small, detailed still lives of the objects and markers left behind. Ex-Voto has garnered widespread attention, earning Tomlinson a spot on the shortlist for BJP’s International Photography Award and the 2017 Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize, and winning the Hotshoe Award/Renaissance Photography Prize. The SWPA judges praised the series for its beautiful production, technical excellence and sensitive illustration of pilgrimage as a journey of discovery and sacrifice, and winning the SWPA has won Tomlinson $25,000. The SWPA Open Photographer of the Year award went to Bulgarian photographer Veselin Atanasov, a self-taught IT specialist who …

2018-04-20T15:59:57+00:00

A Portrait of our National Health Service

Lewis Khan is a London-based photographer and filmmaker specialising in social documentary. Since graduating from UWE in Bristol, where he studied photography, he has won the 2014 Shuffle Film Festival Short Film Prize for his moving portrayal of George, a man living on the fringes of South London. He has also worked on commissions for a number of well-respected publications, including the FT Weekend Magazine. Khan’s photograph that was selected for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts his subject, Gina, in an operating theatre after performing surgery. The portrait was taken during Khan’s time as Artist in Residence at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. During this residency, he produced a series called ‘Our NHS’, which documented the experiences of staff and patients at the hospital. The images seek to capture the emotional impact of a life spent working in the NHS, particularly during this time of difficulty within the service. Gina’s portrait is a compelling insight into the experiences of the doctors and nurses striving to keep the NHS on its feet.   How did you …

2018-04-16T14:11:10+00:00

Q&A: Ronaldo Schemidt, World Press Photo of the Year winner

“Normally people don’t get set on fire during the protests, but there were many barricades on fire and the demonstrators use Molotov bombs,” says Ronaldo Schemidt. “I got the photo when a National Guard motorcycle exploded during a clash between demonstrators and government forces. It was lying on the floor, on fire, surrounded by young people. One of the protestors hit the tank, generating an explosion. Then the guy in the photo caught fire. I was standing a few meters away with my back to him, but when I felt the heat of the flames, I got my camera and turned around to start shooting whatever had just happened. It all took just a few seconds, so I didn’t know what I was shooting. I was moved by instinct, it was very quick. I didn’t stop shooting until I realised what was going on. There was somebody on fire running towards me.”

2018-04-17T11:56:04+00:00

Ronaldo Schemidt wins World Press Photo of the Year 2018 award

Ronaldo Schemidt has won the World Press Photo of the Year award for an arresting image taken during an anti-government protest in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas. The chosen picture shows 28-year-old José Víctor Salazar Balza ablaze amid violent clashes with police after the gas tank of a nearby motorbike exploded. Miraculously, Salazar survived the incident but with first- and second-degree burns. Schemidt’s image was among six nominated for the award, including by Patrick Brown (Australia) for his photograph of the Rohingya crisis; Adam Ferguson (Australia) for his image of a Boko Haram survivor; Toby Melville (UK) for his photo following the immediate aftermath of a terror attack in London; and Ivor Prickett (Ireland) for two images from the Battle for Mosul. Of the winning image, jury member and deputy director of photography at National Geographic, Whitney C Johnson said: “It’s quite symbolic. The man, he has a mask on his face. He’s come to represent not just himself and himself on fire, but this idea of Venezuela burning.” Bulent Kiliç, another jury member and chief photographer …

2018-04-13T12:42:52+00:00

Finding Identity Through Illness: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Lucus Joyce’s weekly People’s Choice winning portrait is a haunting image of his friend Ashley, who lives with pernicious anemia. Inspired by the thousand yard stare, a term often used to describe the blank, unfocused gaze of soldiers who have become emotionally detached from the horrors around them, Joyce sought to use the portrait to depict the many aspects of Ashley’s life and identity.

2018-04-13T11:36:45+00:00

There should be more dark-skinned models and self-love in the fashion industry: This week’s Portrait of Britain People’s Choice winner Thomas Morgan

Thomas Morgan’ winning portrait is of Malick Darbo, a young model just starting out in the industry. The aim for the image and wider series was to highlight the beauty of dark skin, which has been underrepresented in the fashion industry for many years. Thomas maintains a particular interest in fashion photography. Since being given his first DSLR camera on his 17th birthday, he has spent time curating shoots with his family and friends. In 2016, he arranged a shoot with a friend he thought could be a model. Off the back of those images, his friend got signed to a modelling agency, and Thomas was invited to test shoot and build up portfolios for new models, giving him room to experiment with style and technique. Being selected as our People’s Choice Weekly Winner is the first public recognition Thomas has received for his work. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? For a while I have wanted to do a series …

2018-04-03T16:46:48+00:00

25 artists shortlisted for Contemporary African Photography Prize

Founded in 2012 by Swiss artist Benjamin Füglister, the Contemporary African Photography Prize aims “to raise the profile of African photography and encourage a rethinking of the image of Africa”. Open to photographers from anywhere in the world whose work engages with the African continent or its diaspora, it picks out five winners every year and shows their work at major photography festivals around the world. This year 800 photographers entered, of whom 25 have made it to the shortlist.

2018-03-28T14:49:21+00:00

Winner of the BJP International Photography Award 2018 Announced

The winners of the International Photography Award 2018 are Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter & Tobias, who have won with their series The Merge, an in-depth exploration into artificial intelligence and robotics, which aims to explore and visually interpret the possibility that we are living inside a simulation. Having shared a studio but worked separately for several years, Sara, Peter and Tobias came together to start a collaborative creative studio in 2013. “Coming together gave us room to experiment,” Sara explains. “We each wanted to move away from the conventional shape and form of documentary or editorial photography. Then we realised that if we wanted to do things differently, and wanted something different to happen, we needed to do everything differently, so we came together as a collective.” Since forming their collective, Sara, Peter and Tobias have made a name for themselves with their first project and photobook, Phenomena. This debut project was an anthropological study of UFOs and extraterrestrials, and was exhibited at Rencontres d’Arles and nominated for Prix de la Photo Figaro. It introduced …

2018-03-27T09:40:06+00:00

BJP Staff