All posts filed under: Awards

Daniel Shea wins the Foam Paul Huf Award 2018

“I’m a bit at a loss at the moment; to say that I’m honoured feels like an understatement,” says photographer Daniel Shea, who has won the 12th Foam Paul Huf Award. “I’ve been following this award and Foam for a long time, and I feel incredibly honored, grateful, lucky, and humbled by this opportunity.” Shea has won the prize with his series 43-35 10th Street, described as a reflection on late capitalism and its effects on New York City. He wins €20,000 and a solo show at the Foam Fotografiemuseum in Amsterdam, which will take place in Autumn this year.


A Portrait of Britain: I wanted to give a face to the girl I was and the girls who are

Carolyn Mendelsohn is a portrait photographer and filmmaker based in the UK. Her most recognisable body of work, Being Inbetween, is a continually evolving series of portraits of girls aged between ten and twelve. The work arises from Mendelsohn’s own memories of this age, and the desire to give a voice to this undefinable age-group. Using short interviews and powerful portraits, Mendelsohn reveals each of the girls’ identities, telling us stories about the young women of tomorrow. Mendelsohn describes the series as partly collaborative; she lets her subjects choose how they are represented, from picking their outfits to how they should stand. Her selected photograph for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts 10-year-old Alice, who stares indomitably into the camera, evoking a classical painting. The image is an account of female strength and its many forms. How did you create your selected portrait, and what was the story behind it? The portrait of Alice is from my long-term project Being Inbetween. Before the sitting, Alice had filled out and returned a simple form with questions about her …


Simone Sapienza’s alternative view of Vietnam

Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, which addresses the control of the one-party Communist government, and United States of Vietnam, which looks at the slow victory of capitalism over communism and its consequences for Vietnam’s economy. Using a combination of a staged, typological form of photography in United States of Vietnam, and a more autonomous, naturalistic style for Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, Sapienza intends to leave something for the viewer to work out. “They have to try to put their feet in the author’s shoes,” he says. “They just need to get the leitmotiv of your project, not the full, descriptive content. In that exchange lives the real core of the project.”


International Photography Awards 2018 Shortlist Announced

For the past fourteen years, British Journal of Photography has invited talented photographers from all over the world to enter our International Photography Awards. This year five artists have made the shortlist – Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter and Tobias; Polish-born and London-based photographer Paulina Otylie Surys; Indian photographer Poulomi Basu; Harit Srikhao, a photographer from Thailand; and Alys Tomlinson, who lives and often shoots in the UK. Their work ranges from a study of simulated realities, to a complex portrayal of the protracted fight for land and resources in Central India over the last 50 years, and a dreamlike series that draws on idolatry and Hindu cosmology. All five finalists will receive VIP access to this year’s Photo London and Peckham 24, with travel and accommodation provided for those living outside London. The winner will get a professional review and reprint of their portfolio, and a £5000 production grant from Metro Imaging towards a solo show at TJ Boulting, a leading, central London gallery. This year the entries were judged by an acclaimed panel comprised …


Shortlists announced for the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

The Sony World Photography Awards prides itself on being a truly global competition, and this year it received almost 320,000 entries from over 200 countries and territories. The awards cover four separate competitions – Professional, Open, Youth and Student Focus – which are themselves categorised into areas such as Architecture, Contemporary Issues, Landscape, Portraiture, and Travel. The winners will be revealed on 19 April, and a curated exhibition of the work will take place at Somerset House, London from 20 April-06 May.


ICP’s 2018 Infinity Award winners

Bruce Davidson has won a Lifetime Achievement prize in this year’s ICP Infinity Awards, which will be formally presented on 09 April. Best-known for his two-year project on the poverty-stricken residents of East 100th Street, Davidson joined Magnum Photos in 1958 and showed his work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1963. His work often documents social inequality, and includes iconic series such as The Dwarf, Brooklyn Gang, and Freedom Rides.


Rosie Matheson on how being selected for Portrait of Britain 2016 has helped shape her career

London-based photographer Rosie Matheson has worked on a number of editorial projects for clients such as Nike, Adidas and The Financial Times, whilst evolving her own self-initiated projects. Her most recognisable series, Boys, celebrates the diverse and vulnerable beauty of young men. In 2016, she entered one of the photographs from the series, Elliot, into Portrait of Britain, and the image instantly became an iconic marker of British inner-city youth. Since her great achievement for Portrait of Britain 2016, her work has gone from strength to strength. She has begun a new project in LA, whilst also working towards releasing Boys as a book. Rosie has been featured in several publications, including Dazed, i-D and The Culture Trip, garnering national attention with her intimate, documentary-style portraits of young men and women across the world. Can you tell me about the photograph you entered into Portrait of Britain in 2016? I was first made aware of the subject of the photograph, Elliott, through a mutual friend. At this time, around December 2015, Elliott was spending most …


British Journal of Photography is calling all photographers to enter Portrait of Britain 2018

View our gallery of last year’s winning portraits for inspiration here. BJP welcomes entries for the third edition of Portrait of Britain, the UK’s biggest public art exhibition “I was thrilled to be chosen as one of the photographers showing in Portrait of Britain,” says 2017 winner Brock Elbank, “I love the idea of the gallery being in a public space, and part of my portrait practice has always been to champion the complexities and beauty found in ‘ordinary’ people and everyday life.” Portrait of Britain is an exhibition by the people, for the people. Each year, 100 winning photographs are exhibited on JCDecaux screens nationwide, which appear on high streets and roadsides, and in transport hubs. The accessibility of the exhibition goes hand in hand with its subject matter – as much a celebration of our country’s people as it is of photography, Portrait of Britain aims to reflect the many faces of modern Britain, and to show the unique culture and diversity of its people. From casual snapshots and selfies to images from …


Ivor Prickett, World Press Photo of the Year double nominee

“It’s crazy, I can’t believe it,” says Ivor Prickett, of his two nominations for the World Press Photo of the Year award. “Out of a line up of six, to have two images seems insane considering the amount of great work being produced last year. I can’t quite believe it.” He’s on the phone from Iraq where he’s headed back back to Mosul, the city he’s been photographing for well over a year. Iraq’s second biggest city, Mosul was taken by ISIS militants in June 2014; in October 2016 Iraqi troops began a major offensive to regain the city, the largest military operation since the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and Prickett joined them right away. Originally from Ireland, he’s been based in the Middle East since 2009 and says that “as a reporter in the region, I couldn’t help but cover it”.


Q&A: Ronaldo Schemidt, World Press Photo of the Year nominee

“Normally people don’t get set on fire during the protests, but there were many barricades on fire and the demonstrators use Molotov bombs,” says Ronaldo Schemidt. “I got the photo when a National Guard motorcycle exploded during a clash between demonstrators and government forces. It was lying on the floor, on fire, surrounded by young people. One of the protestors hit the tank, generating an explosion. Then the guy in the photo caught fire. I was standing a few meters away with my back to him, but when I felt the heat of the flames, I got my camera and turned around to start shooting whatever had just happened. It all took just a few seconds, so I didn’t know what I was shooting. I was moved by instinct, it was very quick. I didn’t stop shooting until I realised what was going on. There was somebody on fire running towards me.”


BJP Staff