All posts filed under: Awards

I am always fascinated by how photography and images can construct the truth: Harit Srikhao on his IPA shortlisted series, Mt. Meru

Harit Srikhao is a young photographer from Thailand. His IPA shortlisted series, Mt. Meru, reflects on the political crisis that gripped Thailand from 2007 to 2014, prompting an awakening that called into question long-accepted social norms. The series draws on idolatry and Hindu cosmology, reconstructing discernable Thai imagery of ‘the king’ to challenge social hierarchy. The series recently appeared in Foam Magazine’s annual Talent issue, as well as in an exhibition at the Foam Fotografiemuseum in Amsterdam. In 2016, Harit received the second prize for the Gomma Grant, for his series Whitewash, which was shortlisted again in 2017 for the BJP Breakthrough Award. We spoke to Harit to find out more about his work. Can you tell us about your IPA shortlisted series, Mt. Meru? I am always fascinated by how photography and images can construct the truth. The idea for Mt. Meru has developed since 2014. The function of image in the series is not only to distort remembrance, but also to control dreams and motivate an ultimate desire. I am trying to redefine …

2018-03-09T11:43:43+00:00

This is the project I’ve always wanted to shoot: Alys Tomlinson on her IPA shortlisted series

Travelling to pilgrimage sites in Lourdes in France, Ballyvourney in Ireland and Grabarka in Poland, Alys developed an interest in the hidden markers and offerings left behind by religious visitors. ‘Ex-votos’ are the names of these signs of gratitude and devotion, which create tangible narratives between faith, person and landscape. The series encompasses formal portraiture, large format landscape photography, and small, detailed still lives of the objects and markers left behind. Tomlinson is a London-based editorial and fine art photographer, working across a variety of mediums. Her previous works have garnered international attention, earning her the Hotshoe Award/Renaissance Photography Prize, and a place on last year’s Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize shortlist. Can you tell me about your IPA shortlisted series Ex-Voto? This series explores the relationship between faith, people, and the landscape. Placed anonymously and often hidden from view, ‘Ex-Votos’ are offerings left by pilgrims as signs of gratitude and devotion. ‘Ex-Votos’ can take many forms, including prayer notes hidden in rocks, crosses etched into stone, ribbons wrapped around twigs, and discarded crutches. I shot the series …

2018-03-08T16:45:22+00:00

Daniel Shea wins the Foam Paul Huf Award 2018

“I’m a bit at a loss at the moment; to say that I’m honoured feels like an understatement,” says photographer Daniel Shea, who has won the 12th Foam Paul Huf Award. “I’ve been following this award and Foam for a long time, and I feel incredibly honored, grateful, lucky, and humbled by this opportunity.” Shea has won the prize with his series 43-35 10th Street, described as a reflection on late capitalism and its effects on New York City. He wins €20,000 and a solo show at the Foam Fotografiemuseum in Amsterdam, which will take place in Autumn this year.

2018-03-08T12:49:29+00:00

A Portrait of Britain: I wanted to give a face to the girl I was and the girls who are

Carolyn Mendelsohn is a portrait photographer and filmmaker based in the UK. Her most recognisable body of work, Being Inbetween, is a continually evolving series of portraits of girls aged between ten and twelve. The work arises from Mendelsohn’s own memories of this age, and the desire to give a voice to this undefinable age-group. Using short interviews and powerful portraits, Mendelsohn reveals each of the girls’ identities, telling us stories about the young women of tomorrow. Mendelsohn describes the series as partly collaborative; she lets her subjects choose how they are represented, from picking their outfits to how they should stand. Her selected photograph for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts 10-year-old Alice, who stares indomitably into the camera, evoking a classical painting. The image is an account of female strength and its many forms. How did you create your selected portrait, and what was the story behind it? The portrait of Alice is from my long-term project Being Inbetween. Before the sitting, Alice had filled out and returned a simple form with questions about her …

2018-04-03T16:55:29+00:00

Simone Sapienza’s alternative view of Vietnam

Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, which addresses the control of the one-party Communist government, and United States of Vietnam, which looks at the slow victory of capitalism over communism and its consequences for Vietnam’s economy. Using a combination of a staged, typological form of photography in United States of Vietnam, and a more autonomous, naturalistic style for Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, Sapienza intends to leave something for the viewer to work out. “They have to try to put their feet in the author’s shoes,” he says. “They just need to get the leitmotiv of your project, not the full, descriptive content. In that exchange lives the real core of the project.”

2018-03-06T13:44:04+00:00

International Photography Awards 2018 Shortlist Announced

For the past fourteen years, British Journal of Photography has invited talented photographers from all over the world to enter our International Photography Awards. This year five artists have made the shortlist – Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter and Tobias; Polish-born and London-based photographer Paulina Otylie Surys; Indian photographer Poulomi Basu; Harit Srikhao, a photographer from Thailand; and Alys Tomlinson, who lives and often shoots in the UK. Their work ranges from a study of simulated realities, to a complex portrayal of the protracted fight for land and resources in Central India over the last 50 years, and a dreamlike series that draws on idolatry and Hindu cosmology. All five finalists will receive VIP access to this year’s Photo London and Peckham 24, with travel and accommodation provided for those living outside London. The winner will get a professional review and reprint of their portfolio, and a £5000 production grant from Metro Imaging towards a solo show at TJ Boulting, a leading, central London gallery. This year the entries were judged by an acclaimed panel comprised …

2018-04-04T13:43:07+00:00

Shortlists announced for the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

The Sony World Photography Awards prides itself on being a truly global competition, and this year it received almost 320,000 entries from over 200 countries and territories. The awards cover four separate competitions – Professional, Open, Youth and Student Focus – which are themselves categorised into areas such as Architecture, Contemporary Issues, Landscape, Portraiture, and Travel. The winners will be revealed on 19 April, and a curated exhibition of the work will take place at Somerset House, London from 20 April-06 May.

2018-02-28T14:13:12+00:00

ICP’s 2018 Infinity Award winners

Bruce Davidson has won a Lifetime Achievement prize in this year’s ICP Infinity Awards, which will be formally presented on 09 April. Best-known for his two-year project on the poverty-stricken residents of East 100th Street, Davidson joined Magnum Photos in 1958 and showed his work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1963. His work often documents social inequality, and includes iconic series such as The Dwarf, Brooklyn Gang, and Freedom Rides.

2018-02-27T13:44:38+00:00

I like to keep my subjects in continuous movement and direction: Rory Lewis on creating a compelling portrait

Rory Lewis is an acclaimed portrait photographer who has worked with a wide range of subjects, from British army generals to famous actors such as Sir Patrick Stewart, William Shatner and Sir Ian McKellan. After embarking on a mammoth project with the British Army in 2016, Lewis entered a photograph from the resulting series, ‘Soldiery’, into Portrait of Britain. The selected portrait of Captain Anani-Isaacs was chosen as a symbol of the modernity and diversity of the new British army. Lewis has since taken the project to new heights, and is now working with Italian army regiments to produce similarly styled photographs that draw inspiration from Napoleonic era artists. While Lewis is still inspired by art rather than photography, his new series ‘Portraitist’ is a sharp turn from the static portraiture of ‘Soldiery’; it dramatically depicts celebrities in the style of Caravaggio. He is hoping to extend ‘Portraitist’ by using groups of actors to create scenes reminiscent of Renaissance art. Lewis believes that the key to good portraiture is being bold and taking risks with …

2018-04-03T16:31:35+00:00

Rosie Matheson on how being selected for Portrait of Britain 2016 has helped shape her career

London-based photographer Rosie Matheson has worked on a number of editorial projects for clients such as Nike, Adidas and The Financial Times, whilst evolving her own self-initiated projects. Her most recognisable series, Boys, celebrates the diverse and vulnerable beauty of young men. In 2016, she entered one of the photographs from the series, Elliot, into Portrait of Britain, and the image instantly became an iconic marker of British inner-city youth. Since her great achievement for Portrait of Britain 2016, her work has gone from strength to strength. She has begun a new project in LA, whilst also working towards releasing Boys as a book. Rosie has been featured in several publications, including Dazed, i-D and The Culture Trip, garnering national attention with her intimate, documentary-style portraits of young men and women across the world. Can you tell me about the photograph you entered into Portrait of Britain in 2016? I was first made aware of the subject of the photograph, Elliott, through a mutual friend. At this time, around December 2015, Elliott was spending most …

2018-04-04T13:45:26+00:00

BJP Staff