All posts filed under: Portrait of Britain

‘I wanted to show the joy of life’: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Yolanda Y. Liou is a self-taught photographer who began taking photographs in 2011 while backpacking through Europe, after her mum gifted her with a digital camera. Having had no initial intention of becoming a professional photographer, three years later she stepped into fashion photography. Despite it being challenging and competitive at times, Liou is constantly enchanted by the world of photography, and her work has been featured in GQ, Marie Claire, Elle and Grazia. Having moved to the UK seven years ago, Liou has been struck by her sense of belonging, particularly in the capital’s vibrant and exciting fashion industry. Her portrait is an attempt to show people the Britain she sees; full of people, laughter and opportunity. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Po Tseng Ho is a hair and makeup artist. The first time we met was while shooting an editorial about diversity. He was the hairstylist on the shoot and we immediately got on very well. He has …

2018-05-08T10:11:21+00:00

A Portrait of Survival: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Matt Hussey’s portrait is of a woman named Taya. Having met Taya through a friend, Hussey was struck by her determination to turn a history of abuse into an empowering and meaningful future. The portrait Hussey and Taya created together evokes rebirth and survival, incorporating water as a symbol of peace and renewal, but also of danger and uncertainty. Taken from an ambitious personal project called ‘The Photographer’s Journey’, Hussey’s portrait of Taya was shot as part of a self-imposed challenge to photograph someone every day for a year. Two and a half years later, Hussey is still working on that project, and now has hundreds of portraits to show for it. Specialising in portraiture, with a focus on environmental and documentary portraiture, Hussey seeks to incorporate people’s environments into his work, with a look to take a wider view of his subjects’ identity, both literally and figuratively. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? The portrait is of a woman named …

2018-05-04T16:19:54+00:00

A Portrait of Resilience: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Vikram Kushwah’s portrait is of his friend’s teenage daughter, Jasmine, who is in her second year of cancer treatment. Inspired by his wife, who also had cancer in her teens and lost her hair, Kushwah’s aim for the image and wider series was to give Jasmine a sense of empowerment. Indian-born Kushwah initially studied fashion at University, before taking a photography module that got him hooked on taking pictures. Kushwah decided from there that he wanted to be a photographer. His work encompasses both art and fashion photography, and he has been featured in several high-profile exhibitions, such as Vogue Italia’s Best of PhotoVogue, and the recent Association of Photographers AOP50: Images that Defined an Age. He also received bronze at the Young Lions’ Award in the Best Photography category at Cannes. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Jasmine, my subject for the photograph, is the 14-year-old daughter of a friend. She is in her second year of cancer treatment. Prior …

2018-04-27T14:05:50+00:00

Portrait of Britain: Diversifying the Traditional Group Portrait

Frederic Aranda is a photographer specializing in group portraiture. His work has twice been selected for Portrait of Britain, with both his winning images standing out for their dramatic feel and quirky composure. Aranda works against the grain. His images shirk traditionally hierarchical, staid forms of group portraiture, and aim for naturalism and diversity. Aranda was born in Switzerland but moved to the UK twenty years ago, initially to study Japanese at Oxford. A completely self-taught photographer, Aranda has since worked for a number of high-profile publications, including Vanity Fair and Vogue. He has also been shortlisted by The Times as Young Photographer of the Year, and his first photobook, Electric Fashion, was published by Skira in 2015, and launched at the V&A. Since being selected for Portrait of Britain, Aranda has won first prize for editorial in the Swiss Photo Award, for his portfolio of group projects. How did you create the selected portraits that you entered into Portrait of Britain 2016, and what are the stories behind them? I had two images selected: …

2018-04-25T09:58:05+00:00

A Portrait of our National Health Service

Lewis Khan is a London-based photographer and filmmaker specialising in social documentary. Since graduating from UWE in Bristol, where he studied photography, he has won the 2014 Shuffle Film Festival Short Film Prize for his moving portrayal of George, a man living on the fringes of South London. He has also worked on commissions for a number of well-respected publications, including the FT Weekend Magazine. Khan’s photograph that was selected for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts his subject, Gina, in an operating theatre after performing surgery. The portrait was taken during Khan’s time as Artist in Residence at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. During this residency, he produced a series called ‘Our NHS’, which documented the experiences of staff and patients at the hospital. The images seek to capture the emotional impact of a life spent working in the NHS, particularly during this time of difficulty within the service. Gina’s portrait is a compelling insight into the experiences of the doctors and nurses striving to keep the NHS on its feet.   How did you …

2018-04-16T14:11:10+00:00

Finding Identity Through Illness: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Lucus Joyce’s weekly People’s Choice winning portrait is a haunting image of his friend Ashley, who lives with pernicious anemia. Inspired by the thousand yard stare, a term often used to describe the blank, unfocused gaze of soldiers who have become emotionally detached from the horrors around them, Joyce sought to use the portrait to depict the many aspects of Ashley’s life and identity.

2018-04-13T11:36:45+00:00

There should be more dark-skinned models and self-love in the fashion industry: This week’s Portrait of Britain People’s Choice winner Thomas Morgan

Thomas Morgan’ winning portrait is of Malick Darbo, a young model just starting out in the industry. The aim for the image and wider series was to highlight the beauty of dark skin, which has been underrepresented in the fashion industry for many years. Thomas maintains a particular interest in fashion photography. Since being given his first DSLR camera on his 17th birthday, he has spent time curating shoots with his family and friends. In 2016, he arranged a shoot with a friend he thought could be a model. Off the back of those images, his friend got signed to a modelling agency, and Thomas was invited to test shoot and build up portfolios for new models, giving him room to experiment with style and technique. Being selected as our People’s Choice Weekly Winner is the first public recognition Thomas has received for his work. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? For a while I have wanted to do a series …

2018-04-03T16:46:48+00:00

Portrait of Britain People’s Choice: I think my portrait records something a little more potent than all the selfies that clog up my sister’s iPhone

Josh Adam Jones is a Photography student at UWE in Bristol. Last year, his ongoing series, ‘99 Peace Walls’, was published on BJP. The project was made up of portraits of young people living in Belfast, a city that is still healing its old political and religious wounds. Josh’s interest in social documentary has developed in his last two years of studying. His People’s Choice portrait of his younger sister was taken as a test for an upcoming trip to Muscat, Oman, where Josh will be shooting expatriate communities. Josh has always considered community and family dynamics when shooting, and the portrait of his sister reflects both his pride in her, and a sibling spat; his sister Leah hates the portrait. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? I entered a number of portraits into Portrait of Britain this year – a selection of stand alone images as well as work from my ongoing series ‘99 Peace Walls’, which was published on …

2018-04-03T16:51:16+00:00

When shooting portraits, I often feel awkward, and I invite that awkwardness to begin with: Harry Flook on creating a compelling portrait

Harry Flook is a Bristol-based writer and photographer, whose photographic work is rooted in his personal experiences. Having left his own religious faith, he embarked on ‘Apostate’, a project photographing those who had done the same, and he stumbled across a vast community of ex-religious individuals while doing so. Making this work then culminated in another project, ‘Beyond What is Written’, set in the heart of ‘bible belt’ America and addressing the subject from a different perspective. Both series explore the concept of community outside religion, for people whose sense of community was once constructed by the religious groups they were a part of. Harry entered a portrait from ‘Apostate’ into Portrait of Britain last year, and it was displayed across the country as part of our nationwide exhibition. We spoke to Harry about the value of awkwardness, choosing the perfect subject, and creating a compelling portrait. How did you create your selected portrait, and what was the story behind it? This portrait was shot as a test for a project I’m still working on, …

2018-03-21T10:43:21+00:00

This was a highly personal and difficult project for me to make: Lauren Forster on her Portrait of Britain People’s Choice portrait and intimate series

Lauren Forster is a photographer and lecturer in Lens Based Media at The Arts University Bournemouth. Her work addresses sociological issues and the human condition. Many of her projects have maintained a particular focus on religion, illness and disability. Her most personal series, ‘Ground Control to Mother Hen’, documents family life since her mother’s secondary brain cancer diagnosis in 2016, which has now been rendered inoperable. The series captures strength and fragility during dark moments of pain, struggle and loneliness. The resulting images offer an intimate insight into this period of loss and transition. Forster’s portrait was selected by BJP’s editorial team as one of their favourite weekly Portrait of Britain entries. It was then voted as the People’s Choice favourite by Facebook users, becoming our first weekly winner. The portrait depicts Forster’s father in his Salvation Army uniform. Since his wife’s diagnosis, he has given up his life’s work serving as a missionary in Africa to care for her in the UK. This portrait reunites him with the sense of purpose and identity that …

2018-04-03T16:54:32+00:00

BJP Staff