All posts filed under: Portrait of Britain

Issue #7876: The Portrait Issue

Our annual portrait edition returns with Jono Rotman’s photographs of New Zealand’s most notorious biker gang; Faces Places, a collaboration between French filmmaker Agnes Varda and street artist, JR; Richard Billingham’s return home for his cinematic portrayal of Ray & Liz; and a selection from this year’s Portrait of Britain, our nationwide exhibition taking place across JCDecaux screens up and down the country. Our journey begins with Jono Rotman’s photographs of New Zealand’s largest, most notorious biker gang, the Mongrel Mob. Though he is looking at the subculture as an outsider, Rotman eschews a traditional documentarian approach to his subject matter. In doing so, the project’s scope extends beyond the mob itself to touch upon issues related to New Zealand’s charged colonial past and self-professed biculturalism, the politics and ethics of portraiture, and the intersections of seemingly disparate human experience. With Brexit on the horizon, Portrait of Britain has never felt so timely, putting citizens centre stage across high streets, shopping malls and major transport hubs throughout September, asking us to reflect on who we …

2018-09-19T14:05:58+00:00

In case you missed Portrait of Britain on Sky News

Ahead of the launch of the Portrait of Britain exhibition tomorrow, Marc Hartog, CEO of 1854 Media, appeared on Sky News with one of the 100 winning photographers Tom Oldham, to discuss the largest display of contemporary portrait photography ever held. “Competitions like these are great opportunities for exposure,” says Tom, “And they offer the chance to be featured among the greatest photographers in the country.”   As a platform, Portrait of Britain is unprecedented, exposing photographers’ work both to the public and the media. And this year, we have expanded that platform to the new Portrait of Britain book and online gallery, allowing people to see all of the photographers’ images in one place. The book, published by Hoxton Mini Press gives our audience the opportunity to really see this amazing tapestry of Britain, to delve in to the rich kaleidoscope of images, and to read the fascinating stories behind each of the faces. Portrait of Britain is a celebration of our country’s unique heritage and diversity. It’s also public art on an unprecedented …

2018-09-04T13:54:56+00:00

Meet our Portrait of Britain 2018 winners

This year marks the third annual Portrait of Britain exhibition. As much a showcase of photography as it is a celebration of our nation, Portrait of Britain is the largest contemporary portrait exhibition ever held. And for the first time since the exhibition’s inception, British Journal of Photography has produced a book in collaboration with Hoxton Mini Press, containing the 200 shortlisted entries, from which the 100 winners have been chosen. Among the winning photographs is Kovi Konowiecki’s portrait of East London twins, Dick and Clark – Kovi’s second winning Portrait of Britain image in the competition’s three-year history. In 2016, Kovi’s portrait of Shmuley, a young Orthodox Jewish boy, was also selected. “It is always cool to be a part of an exhibition with such a wide-reaching audience,” says Kovi. “Having been selected for Portrait of Britain a couple of years ago, it was amazing seeing my photograph across numerous screens and tube stations on my daily commute. It feels great to be a part of the exhibition again.” Joining Kovi in the exhibition is John Davis, …

2018-09-14T15:17:50+00:00

Portrait of Britain 2018 Shortlist Announced

“These images, in all their diversity, reflect something of the richness of this nation and remind us of what there is to be celebrated,” says Martin Usborne, Portrait of Britain judge and Co-Founder of Hoxton Mini Press, the publisher of the first ever Portrait of Britain book. “We hope the book is a powerful snapshot of a moment in our shared history that stands the test of time.” Over the past three years, British Journal of Photography’s Portrait of Britain award has gone from strength to strength. Originally conceived in 2016 in response to Brexit, the nationwide exhibition has flourished into a celebration of the many faces of modern Britain, reflecting the unique diversity of our country and its contemporary photographic talent.  This year, the Portrait of Britain competition saw a staggering number of entries. The 13,000 submissions were judged by an elite panel of photographic experts, made up of Simon Bainbridge, Editor in Chief of British Journal of Photography; Caroline Hunter, Picture Editor at Guardian Weekend Magazine; Olivia Arthur, Magnum Photographer; and Martin Usborne, …

2018-07-26T10:03:26+00:00

‘I wanted to show the joy of life’: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Yolanda Y. Liou is a self-taught photographer who began taking photographs in 2011 while backpacking through Europe, after her mum gifted her with a digital camera. Having had no initial intention of becoming a professional photographer, three years later she stepped into fashion photography. Despite it being challenging and competitive at times, Liou is constantly enchanted by the world of photography, and her work has been featured in GQ, Marie Claire, Elle and Grazia. Having moved to the UK seven years ago, Liou has been struck by her sense of belonging, particularly in the capital’s vibrant and exciting fashion industry. Her portrait is an attempt to show people the Britain she sees; full of people, laughter and opportunity. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Po Tseng Ho is a hair and makeup artist. The first time we met was while shooting an editorial about diversity. He was the hairstylist on the shoot and we immediately got on very well. He has …

2018-05-08T10:11:21+00:00

A Portrait of Survival: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Matt Hussey’s portrait is of a woman named Taya. Having met Taya through a friend, Hussey was struck by her determination to turn a history of abuse into an empowering and meaningful future. The portrait Hussey and Taya created together evokes rebirth and survival, incorporating water as a symbol of peace and renewal, but also of danger and uncertainty. Taken from an ambitious personal project called ‘The Photographer’s Journey’, Hussey’s portrait of Taya was shot as part of a self-imposed challenge to photograph someone every day for a year. Two and a half years later, Hussey is still working on that project, and now has hundreds of portraits to show for it. Specialising in portraiture, with a focus on environmental and documentary portraiture, Hussey seeks to incorporate people’s environments into his work, with a look to take a wider view of his subjects’ identity, both literally and figuratively. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? The portrait is of a woman named …

2018-05-04T16:19:54+00:00

A Portrait of Resilience: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Vikram Kushwah’s portrait is of his friend’s teenage daughter, Jasmine, who is in her second year of cancer treatment. Inspired by his wife, who also had cancer in her teens and lost her hair, Kushwah’s aim for the image and wider series was to give Jasmine a sense of empowerment. Indian-born Kushwah initially studied fashion at University, before taking a photography module that got him hooked on taking pictures. Kushwah decided from there that he wanted to be a photographer. His work encompasses both art and fashion photography, and he has been featured in several high-profile exhibitions, such as Vogue Italia’s Best of PhotoVogue, and the recent Association of Photographers AOP50: Images that Defined an Age. He also received bronze at the Young Lions’ Award in the Best Photography category at Cannes. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Jasmine, my subject for the photograph, is the 14-year-old daughter of a friend. She is in her second year of cancer treatment. Prior …

2018-04-27T14:05:50+00:00

Portrait of Britain: Diversifying the Traditional Group Portrait

Frederic Aranda is a photographer specializing in group portraiture. His work has twice been selected for Portrait of Britain, with both his winning images standing out for their dramatic feel and quirky composure. Aranda works against the grain. His images shirk traditionally hierarchical, staid forms of group portraiture, and aim for naturalism and diversity. Aranda was born in Switzerland but moved to the UK twenty years ago, initially to study Japanese at Oxford. A completely self-taught photographer, Aranda has since worked for a number of high-profile publications, including Vanity Fair and Vogue. He has also been shortlisted by The Times as Young Photographer of the Year, and his first photobook, Electric Fashion, was published by Skira in 2015, and launched at the V&A. Since being selected for Portrait of Britain, Aranda has won first prize for editorial in the Swiss Photo Award, for his portfolio of group projects. How did you create the selected portraits that you entered into Portrait of Britain 2016, and what are the stories behind them? I had two images selected: …

2018-04-25T09:58:05+00:00

A Portrait of our National Health Service

Lewis Khan is a London-based photographer and filmmaker specialising in social documentary. Since graduating from UWE in Bristol, where he studied photography, he has won the 2014 Shuffle Film Festival Short Film Prize for his moving portrayal of George, a man living on the fringes of South London. He has also worked on commissions for a number of well-respected publications, including the FT Weekend Magazine. Khan’s photograph that was selected for Portrait of Britain 2017 depicts his subject, Gina, in an operating theatre after performing surgery. The portrait was taken during Khan’s time as Artist in Residence at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. During this residency, he produced a series called ‘Our NHS’, which documented the experiences of staff and patients at the hospital. The images seek to capture the emotional impact of a life spent working in the NHS, particularly during this time of difficulty within the service. Gina’s portrait is a compelling insight into the experiences of the doctors and nurses striving to keep the NHS on its feet.   How did you …

2018-04-16T14:11:10+00:00

Finding Identity Through Illness: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning Portrait

Lucus Joyce’s weekly People’s Choice winning portrait is a haunting image of his friend Ashley, who lives with pernicious anemia. Inspired by the thousand yard stare, a term often used to describe the blank, unfocused gaze of soldiers who have become emotionally detached from the horrors around them, Joyce sought to use the portrait to depict the many aspects of Ashley’s life and identity.

2018-04-13T11:36:45+00:00

BJP Staff