All posts filed under: BJP

1854 Media has been shortlisted for three 2018 PPA Awards

 1854 Media has been shortlisted for three PPA Awards, including Publishing Innovator of the Year, for which Pax Zoega, Head of Agency at Studio 1854, has been shortlisted. Our visual content agency, Studio 1854, has also been shortlisted for The PPA Great Leap Forward Award, and 1854 Media owned British Journal of Photography has been shortlisted for Consumer Media Brand of the Year. Within our categories are a number of prestigious names; Edward Enninful, Editor-in-Chief at Vogue, and GLAMOUR Beauty Club, both part of The Condé Nast Publications, have been shortlisted in The PPA Great Leap Forward Award category. Up against us in the Consumer Media Brand of the Year category are Radio Times and BBC Gardeners’ World, along with Women’s Health and The Economist. “With nearly 400 entries from more than 70 different companies, just to get onto the PPA Awards shortlist is a major achievement in itself,” says Barry McIlheney, CEO of PPA. In the last two years, 1854 Media has scooped three prizes in the annual awards. In 2016, the British Journal …

2018-05-24T17:21:30+00:00

Breaking Point at the Hamburg Triennial

The 18-year-old Hamburg Triennial will be directed for the second time by Polish curator Krzysztof Candrowicz, who moved to Hamburg four years ago and set about transforming the it, bringing people and institutions together, and determined to make it more relevant to the viewing public. The 2015 edition was, he says, “The first holistic attempt to create the collaborative framework of the festival. Before, the museums were basically highlighting their own exhibitions, but there was no actual curatorial collective structure.” The determinedly political and environmentally-conscious theme this year was inspired by an amalgamation of many factors, he says, including spending a year “away from structured, mechanised and commercial reality”, travelling around Latin America, Nepal and India. “Breaking Point became, for me, a metaphor for rapid and sometimes unexpected transformation on a personal and global level.”

2018-05-23T11:39:03+00:00

Following female de-miners in Nagorno Karabakh

Unexploded landmines are responsible for the deaths of 15-20,000 people every year, and currently contaminate 78 countries worldwide. Nagorno Karabakh, a landlocked, mountainous region in South Caucasus, Eastern Europe, has one of the highest per capita incidences of landmine accidents in the world, and a third of the victims are children. Eva Clifford, former online writer at BJP, spent a week with the world’s largest mine clearance organisation, HALO, and their first female demining team in Nagorno Karabakh. Since employing its first female demining team in 2015, HALO now employs 11 women, with more undergoing training this year.

2018-05-22T11:44:12+00:00

Ones to Watch: JD Valiente

José David Valiente’s graphic flash-lit images render his native Spain in an uncanny light. Drawn to the peculiar and mysterious, his projects steer towards the oddities of everyday human behaviour. From documenting the surreal atmosphere and prized pigs of the Semana Porcina – an annual food-farming fair held in his hometown, Lorca – to capturing the dark energy of the underground punk scene, the 31-year-old’s offbeat vision sheds light on diverse aspects of Spanish society.

2018-05-22T11:46:13+00:00

‘When something is less seen, it contains more value’

Daniel Miller is a photography dealer residing on the west coast of the United States, and proprietor of two galleries in Venice Beach and Santa Monica. He is also the founder of photography collecting site YourDailyPhotograph, an initiative that supplies collectors with a variety of images to their inbox each day, which they can then purchase from a trusted source. With more than 7,000 collectors from 75 different countries currently subscribing, Miller has developed a wealth of knowledge on the current photography market, including on key market trends and driving factors. Here he offers some of his advice on collecting in the current art photography market, to coincide with the release of our first free e-guide, The Beginner’s Guide to Collecting Photography. Why is now a good time for people to invest in the photography market? Globally, photography is one of the youngest categories of collectable art. As such, there are still terrific deals available to collectors looking for great images. Specifically looking at the UK, the photography market has great room for growth. Photo London …

2018-05-18T13:55:55+00:00

Photo London: ‘Good art is always in demand and bad art will be always abundant’

ALMANAQUE opened in February 2016 in Mexico City, with a dedication to contemporary photography.  The gallery exhibits and sells international works from both established and emerging artists, exploring current manifestations on image as an artistic dispositive. Alongside gallery work, ALMANAQUE has begun a Portafolio initiative, offering professional consultations on collecting, curating and art direction for individuals, corporations and institutions. We spoke to director Arturo Delgado ahead of Photo London, to find out more about the artists ALMANAQUE are bringing to the event, and to hear Arturo’s insights on collecting. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? The opportunity to share our multi-award winning artists with the UK public. We are bringing four artists to the fair; three from Mexico and one from Russia, representing several generations of contemporary imagery. These renowned artists all have an unexpected bond to the UK. Which artists’ work will you be showing at Photo London? Why? We will be showing work by the preeminent Pablo Ortiz Monasterio, one of the most renowned Mexican photographers, whose …

2018-05-16T16:40:31+00:00

Photo London: Another Kind of Life explained by Barbican curator Alona Pardo

BJP

“They’re all driven by motivations that are both personal and political to a degree, and they are all self-initiated projects,” says curator Alona Pardo of the photographers in the show Another Kind of Life: Photography on the Margins. “Some may have started as commissions, but very early on took on a life of their own. It was interesting to think about the role of the photographer, because often the photographer hides behind the camera as a facade. There is also an interesting subtext of the photographer occupying the position of an outsider within mainstream society. They are there, assertively documenting the world.”

2018-05-16T12:16:00+00:00

Ones to Watch: Valeria Cherchi

Between 1960 and 1997, the idyllic Italian island of Sardinia witnessed a series of kidnappings at the hands of the anonima sequestri sarda – a group of vigilantes meting out justice according to a traditional, local code of honour known as the codice barbaricino. Over 37 years, 162 people were kidnapped for ransom, with some of them killed. The kidnapping of seven-year-old Farouk Kassam in 1992 is particularly vivid for Sardinian-born-and-raised Valeria Cherchi, who was the same age at the time. The case instilled in her a profound fear. “I clearly remember the news, during his fifth month of imprisonment, that the upper part of his ear was found by a priest on a mountainous road in Barbagia, central Sardinia,” she recalls.

2018-05-16T11:03:12+00:00

Ones to Watch: Rie Yamada

Roland Barthes’ tear-jerking account of his confrontation with his mother’s photograph captures the emotions that a picture of a loved one can evoke, and the significance of a family photograph. From early formal portraits of upper-class families shot in studios to contemporary snaps, images have welded families together under the premise of memory. But with private pictures now becoming more public, family photographs are evolving in the way we document our histories. Rie Yamada’s family photographs take it a step further: instead of documenting her nearest and dearest, in her series Familie werden (which translates as Become a family), the photographer plays every relative herself, highlighting gender stereotypes and social archetypes with a good dose of hilarity and absurdity.

2018-05-16T11:05:41+00:00

Ones to Watch: Phoebe Kiely

Phoebe Kiely was 14 years old when she first picked up a camera. It was terrible, though: a four megapixel digital device from Aldi. But despite the poor quality, Kiely became obsessed with taking pictures. One of the earliest photographs she remembers was of her best friend, Amanda, captured in the garden of Kiely’s family home in Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire. “It’s a picture of her on a small trampoline,” she says. “I’m above her and she’s curled up, looking up at me.” The Aldi camera was replaced with a film camera when Kiely hit her late teens and the “buzz” of shooting, developing and seeing the final results of her pictures became stronger. It was what helped her get through three years of working in retail after finishing her A-levels in 2009. “I remember running into town during my 15-minute morning break to drop my film off,” she says. “I would walk back during my lunch hour to pick up the pictures. It was the most exciting part of the day.” Kiely graduated in 2015 with …

2018-05-15T11:44:32+00:00

BJP Staff