All posts filed under: BJP

Ones to Watch: Phoebe Kiely

Phoebe Kiely was 14 years old when she first picked up a camera. It was terrible, though: a four megapixel digital device from Aldi. But despite the poor quality, Kiely became obsessed with taking pictures. One of the earliest photographs she remembers was of her best friend, Amanda, captured in the garden of Kiely’s family home in Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire. “It’s a picture of her on a small trampoline,” she says. “I’m above her and she’s curled up, looking up at me.” The Aldi camera was replaced with a film camera when Kiely hit her late teens and the “buzz” of shooting, developing and seeing the final results of her pictures became stronger. It was what helped her get through three years of working in retail after finishing her A-levels in 2009. “I remember running into town during my 15-minute morning break to drop my film off,” she says. “I would walk back during my lunch hour to pick up the pictures. It was the most exciting part of the day.” Kiely graduated in 2015 with …

2018-05-15T11:44:32+00:00

Photo London: ‘Never buy anything you don’t love!’

White Cube was first opened in 1993 by Jay Jopling, in a small, square room in London’s West End. It now has an exhibition programme extending across three gallery spaces; Bermondsey in South London, Mason’s Yard in St. James’s London, and Hong Kong’s Central District. Since 1993, White Cube has exhibited the work of many of the world’s most highly acclaimed contemporary artists. At Photo London, White Cube will present a solo exhibition by the British artist Darren Almond in the Studio Room Gallery. Almond’s diverse practice incorporates film, installation, sculpture, painting and photography, producing evocative meditations on time and duration, alongside themes of personal and historical memory. We caught up with the director of White Cube, Julia Baumhoff Zouk, to find out more about Darren Almond, and to hear her tips on developing a personal photography collection. What excites you most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? Photo London is the only photography fair we have in the UK, and since its first edition in 2015, it has become more and more important. …

2018-05-15T13:12:56+00:00

Ones to Watch: Phillip Prokopiou

Famously described by Susan Sontag in her 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’ as “a sensibility (as distinct from an idea)”, the appreciation of camp was born out of artifice and opulence, a vulgar fascination with theatrical exaggeration. And while it has long been tied up with LGBTQI culture, it has become a compelling way to convey messages without limits. “To me, camp is a very powerful thing,” says Phillip Prokopiou. “It’s a form of satire – a way to exaggerate and ridicule things that are very serious.” Prokopiou, a South Africa-born, London-based photographer behind an eponymous studio, which he co-founded with his partner-in-life-and-art Panagiotis Poimenidis, has long been fascinated with the power of kitsch to communicate our deepest hopes, fears and fantasies – whether they manifest in the form of a moustachioed Virgin Mary (stage name: Virgin Xtravaganzah) sitting chastely in the glow of ‘Gawd’’s glory, or an otherworldly extraterrestrial gazing into the distance.

2018-05-11T13:47:16+00:00

Photo London: Nadine Ijewere at Red Hook Labs

Nadine Ijewere has been interested in fashion imagery since she was a girl but it wasn’t until she studied photography at the London College of Fashion that she began to pick up on some of its more unsettling undertones – particularly the stereotypes used in the portrayal of non-Western cultures. The Misrepresentation of Representation, an early project that she completed at university reflected on Orientalism and how it came to rigidly define certain cultures for a Western audience.

2018-05-11T14:17:17+00:00

Studio 1854: The power of photography

When the DJI Drone Photography Award launched in November 2017, it called for photographers across the world to submit ideas for creative, drone-shot projects. Rather than generic aerial photography – picture perfect landscapes with little back story – the competition asked that entrants consider compelling narratives and subject matters. In reaching locations impossible on foot, these drone-shot projects would open the viewer’s eyes to new possibilities. The project was supported by DJI, the world leader in civilian drone and aerial imaging technology. DJI has a deep interest in photography and in 2017 it acquired a majority interest in Hasselblad. A series of articles written by Studio 1854 and published on BJP’s website throughout the competition period demonstrated the creative potential of drone photography. BJP’s audience were inspired: 47,825 people visited the competition entry page. After a lengthy judging process – overseen by BJP, DJI and Guardian drone photographer Graeme Robertson –Markel Redondo and Tom Hegen were selected as winners. The Salt Series, photographed by Hegen, documents salt production across Europe. Combining vivid colours and geometric …

2018-07-02T11:28:13+00:00

Ones to Watch: David Denil

Travelling to Kiev in the wake of protest, revolution and civil war, Belgian photographer David Denil set about documenting the aftermath of conflict in the minds of ordinary people still coming to terms with the country’s sharp divisions. The resulting series, Let Us Not Fall Asleep While Walking, departs from journalistic record, instead attempting to depict “the psychological state of this Ukraine looking at its future while haunted by its past and memory,” he says. “The images are metaphorical representations from the everyday life encountered where time seems frozen but dreams of hope still linger.”

2018-05-10T14:14:37+00:00

On Abortion by Laia Abril

Laia Abril is no stranger to themes of distress. Bulimia, coping with the death of a child, the asexual community, virtual sex-performer couples – these are all topics that the Barcelona-based photographer has explored and attempted to demystify with her multi-layered, story-based practice. The subjects she tackles are complex and provocative, but ones she is able to connect with by way of female empathy, “where I can be involved emotionally”, she says.

2018-05-22T10:57:29+00:00

Ones to Watch: Senta Simond’s Rayon Vert

BJP

“Tu sais qu’est-ce que c’est le rayon vert?” Marie Rivière’s listless character Delphine asks, her legs swinging, in Éric Rohmer’s 1986 film Le Rayon Vert [The Green Ray]. The film – a portrait of its main character’s halting search for summer romance – was based on Jules Verne’s 1882 novel of the same name. While in theory its title refers to an optical phenomenon – in which the appearance of the sun as it rises or falls beyond the horizon creates a brief flash of green, and with it a supposed moment of mental clarity for all those who see it – in reality its subject matter is far more elusive. “I related the ‘rayon vert’ phenomenon to the process of photography – this special and quick moment that happens rarely,” Swiss photographer Senta Simond explains, referring to her project of the same name. Her series, which will be published by Kominek and shown at London’s Webber Gallery soon, adds a new, compelling layer to the meteorological event/Jules Verne/ Éric Rohmer mix of references. Indeed, Simond, a former student of ECAL, University of Art and Design Lausanne, from which she graduated last summer, first encountered the concept via the 1986 film.

2018-05-22T11:00:45+00:00

The first victim of war is truth in Poulomi Basu’s Centralia

Poulomi Basu’s Centralia is no easy read. The situation it unravels − a protracted fight for land and resources in central India − is not only complex, but also largely unheard of, especially in mainstream Western media. And Basu, reflecting on contemporary documentary practices, refuses to simplify it into a readily digestible format. Instead, she wishes to reflect the bewildering atmosphere that reigns in the region. “The adage ‘The first victim of any conflict is the truth’, is particularly apt here,” she says. “The conflict, with its many actors all occupying opaque roles, has created a space with its own internal logic and landscape.” Thus, she hopes to take the audience “on a journey to a place where truth and lies, reality and fiction have become blurred”.

2018-05-08T14:16:09+00:00

‘I wanted to show the joy of life’: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Yolanda Y. Liou is a self-taught photographer who began taking photographs in 2011 while backpacking through Europe, after her mum gifted her with a digital camera. Having had no initial intention of becoming a professional photographer, three years later she stepped into fashion photography. Despite it being challenging and competitive at times, Liou is constantly enchanted by the world of photography, and her work has been featured in GQ, Marie Claire, Elle and Grazia. Having moved to the UK seven years ago, Liou has been struck by her sense of belonging, particularly in the capital’s vibrant and exciting fashion industry. Her portrait is an attempt to show people the Britain she sees; full of people, laughter and opportunity. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Po Tseng Ho is a hair and makeup artist. The first time we met was while shooting an editorial about diversity. He was the hairstylist on the shoot and we immediately got on very well. He has …

2018-05-08T10:11:21+00:00

BJP Staff