All posts filed under: Awards

Woman I (Cards), 2014. From the series FLAT DEATH © Sara Cwynar. Courtesy Cooper Cole Gallery, Toronto.

FOAM Talent launches in London

It is not often that you meander around a gallery space and can barely get past the hoards of students, professionals and new talents of photography as they press together to see the photography on display. Such was the bustling opening night of the eclectic FOAM Talent, a group show of 21 up-and-coming photographers under the age of 35, at the Beaconsfield Gallery in London. The photography on display here has already been featured in a dedicated issue of the FOAM magazine, and is now exhibited in over two large rooms in a dynamically curated showcase of more than 100 photographs. “The range of different work is important,” says curator, Mirjam Kooiman. “What ties them together is that they’re young and that they have a strong, autonomous vision, whether it’s through studio or documentary photography.” This year, there is a noticeable emphasis on the physical presentation of the images, adding a new sculptural aspect to the exhibition. Jean-Vincent Simonet, a French photographer, invites us into a psychedelic world of vivid colour marbled with metallic shine. For each display of …

2016-04-26T12:01:37+00:00

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN | 2015-04-17 | M. (23), an afghan rapper and part of a duet band from Herat, hangs out at Aria Cafe on a hot Friday afternoon. Born and raised in Iran, M. is critical of afghan government and that is boldly seen in his music as well as his lifestyle.

Discovering Kiana Hayeri, winner of the Chris Hondros Fund award in the Emerging Talent category

Largely unknown beyond photography circles, Hayeri is the new recipient of the revered photojournalism award, in memory of the late Chris Hondros, who died covering the war in Libya in 2011. Hayeri was born in Iran, but moved to Canada at the age of 17 without speaking a word of English. Initially finding it hard to settle into her new home in Toronto, Hayeri spent the next few years familiarising herself with the creative subjects and a new language.  Inspired by the work of the Canadian photojournalist, Dominic Nahr, it was there that she first began to develop her photography skills, using her camera as a way to ‘bridge the gap’ between two very different cultures as a form of expression as well as communication. “I fell in love with photography because I didn’t have to speak, explain myself or write essays for it,” she says. “I was doing really well and picking up everything quickly. And I was making friends.” Nevertheless, Hayeri returned to her home in the Middle East, and began work on projects that focused on …

2016-04-26T10:06:24+00:00

Kraszna-Krausz Book Awards 2016 announces Best Photography Book Shortlist

Since 1985, the awards have been one of the UK’s leading prizes for books on photography and the moving image. In addition to the Book Awards, the Foundation contributes to the National Media Museum First Book Award, in partnership with the celebrated photobook publisher MACK. The recipient of this prize works alongside MACK to realise a monographic book project of previously unpublished work. Here are the shortlisted projects for the 2016 edition of the prize: Best Photography Book Award Shortlist Selected by judges Anne Lyden (Chair), Mark Power and Julian Stallabrass This year’s photography shortlist includes a retrospective of rare Soviet photobooks, a meditation on memory through the prism of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and an insight into the lives of nine young people living in post-revolution Iran. · The Soviet Photobook 1920–1941, by Mikhail Karasik, edited by Manfred Heiting (Steidl) · The Erasure Trilogy, by Fazal Sheikh (Steidl) · Blank Pages of an Iranian Photo Album, by Newsha Tavakolian (Kehrer Verlag) Best Moving Image Book Award Shortlist Selected by judges James Bell (Chair), Rhianna Dhillon …

2016-04-18T10:55:08+00:00

From the series Taratine Untitled 2015 C Daisuke Yokota courtesy GP Gallery 1

Leading Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota wins Foam Paul Huf Award 2016

Daisuke Yokota, 32, from Saitama, north of Tokyo, in Japan, has a long, meticulous and demanding approach to photography, the kind of work only an obsessive would embark on. Yokota, who is represented by Japanese gallery G/P, is at the vanguard of a new movement of Japanese experimental photographers. He shoots on a compact digital camera, before printing and rephotographing the images on medium-format film. He then prints and reprints, again and again, but this time using heat and light, or applying acid or naked flames to the end results. In the process, the images become distorted, warped, otherworldly. This process results in one-off prints and unique books, often published using unexpected materials. Yokota has made for a name for himself at photography festivals by staging these book-making sessions, in what amounts to public performances of photo publishing. Yokota has produced several acclaimed photobooks in this way, including Linger and Vertigo, each of which sold out over the course of the festivals in which they were launched, and are now invariably hard to find and expensive to …

2016-03-24T14:45:29+00:00

Breakthrough past winners t1

Breakthrough’s past winners explain how the award propelled them to the next level

BJP

The Breakthrough Awards offer an invaluable opportunity for emerging photographers – with winning work being showcased to some of photography’s most influential figures at the Free Range Graduate Shows, featured in British Journal of Photography’s print and online channels and displayed worldwide on leading file-transfer website, WeTransfer. We caught up with the inaugural crop of Breakthrough winners – Felix von der Osten, Adama Jalloh, Tanya Houghton and Tim Pearse (Undergraduate Series Award, Undergraduate Single Image Award, Graduate Series Award and Graduate Single Image Award winners, respectively) – to ask how Breakthrough has winning the award has pushed their career and artistic practice to the next level. How did the Breakthrough Award help advance your career? FELIX VON DER OSTEN: It exposed my work to all different kinds of people [in the UK]. Breakthrough really helped get my name out there as a new emerging photographer. ADAMA JALLOH: It definitely helped with my work being acknowledged by more people and them showing interest in other projects I’m working on. Emma Bowkett, the photo editor of the Financial Times Weekend Magazine, saw …

2016-03-23T13:05:26+00:00

HIPA Grand Ceremony © Brennavan Sritharan

HIPA announces $120,000 grand prize winner

Antonio Aragon Renuncio was awarded the grand prize at the Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award (HIPA), winning $120,000 at the ceremony, which took place at Dubai’s Burj Plaza last night. The Spanish photographer’s winning image, based on the season’s main theme of ‘Happiness’, depicts a group of impoverished Togolese children playing outside an NGO clinic. This marks the fifth edition of a competition which, the organisers say, “was conceived to promote the art of photography by embracing all talents and creative minds in the field from around the world”. In addition to the Grand Prize, HIPA announced 22 more winners across its four categories – Happiness, Wildlife, Father & Son, and General – with five photographers winning prizes in each category and two Special Awards for photographers with a “long-standing commitment to enhancing the art of photography.” HIPA’s overall prize pool totals $400,000. Hameed Husain Isa from Bahrain won first place in the Happiness category, winning $25,000 for his image of two old friends embracing; American Steven Winter won first …

2016-03-29T12:40:45+00:00

BJP International Photography Award Exhibition launches in London

Both Calypso and Hammond were awarded at a private view on Wednesday night, and will display their work until Saturday 19th March 2016 at London’s TJ Boulting gallery. The IPA Series winner, Juno Calypso is showing six photographs and a video installation from her series Joyce, a collection of self-portraits of her invented, signature character. Her work, she says, “modern rituals of seduction and the laboured construction of femininity.” Calypso, 26, a graduate of London College of Communication, won the Series prize from over 1,500 entrants by a judging panel including The Guardian’s photography critic Sean O’Hagan, Self Publish, Be Happy founder Bruno Ceschel, TJ Boulting’s Hannah Watson and BJP’s Executive Editor Diane Smyth. Her character Joyce, rising green and inscrutable, or emerging from a pink heart shaped bath or stood, veiled, in a hall off mirrors,  has been featured in The Guardian, Dazed & Confused and in the Projects section of BJP earlier last year. “Juno Calypso’s work is representative of a new generation of female artists that are refreshing the long tradition of self-portraiture,” Ceschel said in the judging process. “And in doing so, she challenges, …

2016-03-21T13:42:41+00:00

BT white on teal

BJP’s Breakthrough Awards 2016 are open for entries

BJP

The second edition of British Journal of Photography’s Breakthrough Awards are now open for entries, offering students and recent graduates an opportunity to showcase their work and gain international exposure. There are two award categories, one for Undergraduate students and another for recent graduates and current MA students. Both categories offer a Series Award and Single Image Award. Four winners will be selected to have their work exhibited in east London as part of the Free Range graduate shows, and published in BJP’s revered monthly magazine and across our online social channels, reaching over a million creatives worldwide. The winning images will also be showcased globally on WeTransfer, the leading file transfer site with over 70 million visitors a month. Runners up in each category will be featured on the BJP website and receive free WeTransfer+ accounts. Photographs can be captured in any format – film or digital – and in any style or genre. Students and graduates of non-photographic courses may apply. This year’s entries will be judged by a panel of leading creatives and industry experts, including Simon Bainbridge, Editorial Director …

2016-04-01T10:56:53+00:00

Hasaka, Syria - August 1, 2015. A doctor rubs ointment on the burns of Jacob, 16, in front of a poster of Abdullah Ocalan, center, the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, at a YPG hospital compound on the outskirts of Hasaka. According to YPG fighters at the scene, Jacob is an ISIS fighter from Deir al-Zour and the only survivior from an ambush made by YPG fighters over a truck alleged to carry ISIS fighters on the outskirts of Hasaka. Six ISIS fighters died in the attack, 5 of them completely disfigured by the explosion (c) Mauricio Lima for The New York Times

Giving a human face to ‘the other side’ at this year’s WPP

“Mauricio Lima’s image of the young Islamic State fighter is fascinating,” says Vaughn Wallace, who was on the Documentary jury of the World Press Photo competition this year. “It’s quite possibly the first time an Islamic State fighter has been portrayed on such an intimate, visual level.” As Wallace says the image, which shows a 16-year-old fighter named Jacob being treated for severe burns, puts a very different face on a figure usually vilified in the Western media – but for Wallace, this is one of the things that helped win it first prize in the General News Singles category. “Mauricio’s image really stands out in contrast to the ways we typically engage with the IS visually, often through propaganda sourced from social media,” he explains. “Mauricio’s image tells a story and gives a human face to ‘the other side’, sitting in the same tradition as Ghaith Abdul-Ahad’s work embedded with Al-Qaeda in Yemen and Kate Brooks’ photographs of government forces during the early years of the Syrian Civil War. Images like Mauricio’s provide context and perspective to multi-dimensional, highly-political conflicts.” Wallace is the deputy photo editor at Al Jazeera America, the international news broadcaster part-funded …

2016-02-19T13:58:25+00:00

In Amsterdam the jury is working on the World Press Photo Contest 2015. After the specialized jury selected the first batch, the general jury decides who the final winners will be.

World Press Photo head Lars Boering on introducing stringent new Ethics Code to ensure ‘truth’ of entries

Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation, has claimed this year’s World Press Photo awards will not be hamstrung by findings of image manipulation, after the introduction of a new Code of Ethics for all entrants. Boering said of the 2016 awards, which were announced today: “We are delighted by the outcome this independent jury produced, and ready to present an exhibition of powerful imagery to an audience that can trust what they see.” The new code of ethics ensured “a transparent and rigorous verification process,” he said, adding: “This resulted in many more entries being checked, but fewer problems than last year being found. In ten days, we will be releasing a detailed technical report reviewing the verification process, and we will then lead the public conversation on these issues.” Last year was not one World Press Photo will remember with fondness, with news breaking – on the day the winners were announced – that more than 20 percent of the final-round entries had been disqualified. The images in question, the jury had decided, had been manipulated after the …

2016-02-19T11:26:25+00:00

BJP Staff