All posts filed under: Awards

Come to Dominic Hawgood’s Private View

The BJP’s International Photography Award series category attracted 733 entries from all over the world. The winner is a young British photographer, Dominic Hawgood. Dominic’s prize is a major solo exhibition at TJ Boulting gallery, the respected gallery in Fitzrovia, London. Hawgood has spent all week in the gallery, creating a “3D experience” – a new floor, new walls, and the most remarkable light show to showcase his photography. The British Journal of Photography are hosting a private view of the exhibition on Thursday 19th February, from 6pm to 9pm. There will be free wine. And you’re invited. Details are here. “The winner and runners up show that an idea or a story together with a strong execution become more and more crucial in the practice of a photographer,” commented curator and communications specialist Erik Kessels, one of the judges who’d picked him out. “This made the selected works stand out from the others.” Hawgood’s winning project, Under the Influence, is an off-centre exploration of evangelical Christianity, which uses the visual tropes of advertising to create a bold, …

2015-02-18T16:12:41+00:00

Daily life, or what remains

What Remains, which won 2nd Prize in Daily life, Stories in World Press Photo announced today, is a touching portrait of a Bangladeshi couple struggling with old age. Sarker Protick, their grandson, relies on subtlety, simplicity and visual minimalism to draw the viewer into their realm and elicit sympathy. The outcome comes as an inevitable shock. “I find it intriguing how things change with time in our life – relationships and surroundings as well as how we live on with death, loss, disappearance and all that remains,” says Protick. “By default a photograph stores the past, but it also has the ability to project itself in the future. Somewhere there’s a point where time doesn’t work linearly anymore. Timelessness, that’s the point I want to reach.” Protick didn’t set out to be a photographer but in late 2008, while he was studying for a BA in marketing, his mother gave him a cell phone with a built-in camera. He started taking pictures of anything and everything, especially his friends, and once he graduated, enrolled at Pathshala, the South …

2015-04-17T14:10:53+00:00

Mads Nissen – in his own words

I met a gay guy. He was a gentle, soft young man in his early twenties. We met in a bar and we talked about his life. Suddenly, another young guy very aggressively got into his face and asked him if he was a faggot. And my friend just very gently answered him: “Yes, I’m a homosexual.” So the guy just jumps right in and starts punching him. I was speechless. You read about it, you talk about it. But seeing homophobia right in front of you, and seeing a modern country openly attacking someone for being gay… I didn’t know whether to cry or get into the fight. I started to document the different aspects of homophobia in Russia. I met men who pretend to seduce gay men, capture them and torture them on video before putting it online – and there’s more than a hundred of these videos. I photographed a young lesbian couple who have three children and are facing up to losing them, just because they’re gay. I photographed the leaders of the church. I’ve …

2015-04-17T14:11:15+00:00

A strong year for portraiture at World Press Photo

Outside of Mads Nissen’s moving image of a gay couple in Russia, which took the overall prize at World Press Photo this year, were several others that sensitively place a person or people centre frame. Acknowledged across the two awards in the Portraits category (singles and stories) were powerful images of Russian women depicted in domestic settings by the late Andy Rocchelli; military academy cadets in Europe by Paolo Verzone; a woman in China – her feet locked to the chair she is sitting on – who has been accused by authorities of working in the illegal sex trade, by Liu Song; and an eight-year-old girl, decadently dressed to go to a Halloween party, in Texas by Lisa Krantz. But it was an image of a little girl in Australia, dressed all in purple, and a project about a community of sex offenders in southern Florida that took the top awards in this category. Australian photographer Raphaela Rosella, who featured in BJP‘s June 2014 issue, won first prize in the Portraits, Singles category. In the image, we see a young veiled Aboriginal girl (Laurinda) standing at a bus stop waiting for a …

2015-04-17T14:13:38+00:00

Spot News winner Bulent Kilic on his double win

“I didn’t manage to ask this girl’s name or age because of the clashes, but she must have been around 15-years-old,” says Turkish photographer Bulent Kilic, who has won first and third place in the Spot News singles category at this year’s World Press Photo contest. “There were many high school students there, supporting their friend.” Kilic, a photographer with Agence France-Presse, is talking about the clashes that took place between riot police and protestors after the funeral of Berkin Elvan, a 15-year-old boy who died from injuries he suffered during anti-government protests in Istanbul on 12 March 2014. When he heard about the clashes, Kilic, who was in the area, hurried to the scene with two other photographers. He took many images, he says, and worked from 7am until 3am the following morning. But it was for this haunting image of a young wounded girl that he won first prize in the Spot News singles category. Kilic, who was named Photographer of the year 2014 by The Guardian, explains that he saw this girl standing on the street. He was immediately struck by the shock on …

2015-04-17T14:13:45+00:00

Image manipulation hits World Press Photo

Twenty percent of the images in the penultimate round of World Press Photo 2015 were disqualified because they were manipulated, according to Lars Boering, managing director of the organisation – and the Sports Stories category was so badly affected that the jury were unable to award a third prize. “I don’t want to say it is just sports photography because in every category was affected,” Boering comments. “But after the penultimate round, after we had awarded the first and second place, there was nothing left. All the other images had been removed.” Rocked by scandal over suspected image manipulation in recent years, World Press Photo now insists that photographers who reach the penultimate round of the competition submit their raw files and negatives. “They are then all checked by a team of experts, who find everything,” says Boering. “In this case we found a lot and that was very disappointing. It is about trust, about the basic ethics of journalism. These images should be genuine and real; we have to be able to trust the photographs they put in front of …

2015-04-17T14:13:30+00:00

Jury member Donald Weber on the World Press Photo winner

“We really felt like, ‘Let’s be inclusive,’” says Donald Weber, photographer and member of the World Press Photo jury this year (pictured above, at the left end of the second row up). “We wanted to find and take in all of those who tell stories, regardless of how they tell them or where they come from… We debated who we are as photographers, what we are saying, and how we are saying it. I was not necessarily looking for where we are now, but what we can be, and how we can get there. That was the debate, and we were all somewhere on that spectrum, and the Picture of the Year [Mads Nissen’s image of Jon and Alex, a gay couple during an intimate moment in St Petersburg, Russia] is a perfect example of that. It shows that you don’t necessarily have to go around the world to a war zone, you can walk across the street and take a domestic scene. It’s about storytelling and finding the right voice for the subject.”   Nissen’s …

2015-04-17T14:14:19+00:00

Jury unveils winners across eight categories in 58th World Press Photo

Press photographers, photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world submitted just shy of 98,000 entries to this year’s World Press Photo contest. The jury awarded prizes to 42 photographers in eight themed categories. Danish photographer Mads Nissen was named winner of the 2015 contest. He won with his image of a gay couple – Jon and Alex – in St Petersburg, Russia. It is both an intimate image, depicting a moment of tenderness between two lovers, and a photograph that tells a wider story about the increasing difficulties for lesbian and gay people in Russia, where sexual minorities face discrimination and harassment. “It is a historic time for the image,” says jury chair, Michele McNally, in a press statement. “The winning image needs to be aesthetic, to have impact, and to have the potential to become iconic. This photo is aesthetically powerful, and it has humanity.” Nissen’s winning image, which also won first prize in the Contemporary Issues category, is part of a larger project, Homophobia in Russia, which he shot for Scanpix photography agency. “I was hoping for …

2015-04-17T14:14:25+00:00

Magnum 30 Under 30 – winners announced

Magnum’s 30 Under 30 award asked for “documentary photography covering social issues” from photographers the world over and still free-limbed and wide-eyed enough to be in their twenties. A total of 664 photographers sent their photography to be judged.  A shortlist of 60 was selected, and now thirty winners have been announced. You can choose an overall winner with the People’s Choice Award, run by The Photography Show. Judging the event was BJP Projects Editor Gemma Padley, FT Weekend Magazine Deputy Picture Editor Josh Lustig and renowned Magnum photographers Chris Steele-Perkins and Moises Saman. Saman said to IdeasTap: “I was inspired to see so many personal stories that originate from an honest understanding of the issues. I was most impressed by the challenge to the more traditional visual language that most of the finalists applied to their stories.” Competition winners get a portfolio review event at The Photography Show, where their photography will be critiqued by industry professionals from the editorial, publishing, museum, advertising, and gallery sectors. The 30 winning photographers’ work will be included in an exhibition …

2015-04-17T14:14:38+00:00

Tim Hetherington Trust unveils new award shortlist

The legacy of British photographer and filmmaker Tim Hetherington lives on in a brand new award that celebrates innovation in visual storytelling. More than sixty photographers, filmmakers and visual artists were nominated for the £20,000 Visionary Award by an international team of industry experts, and six (four individuals and a duo) have made the shortlist. Dominic Bracco II was chosen for The Backs of Men, a three-chapter series that combines photography, video and theatre to explore the border region of Texas and Mexico, and ‘the killing fields’ of Honduras. Colombia-based Erika Diettes was shortlisted for Reliquaries, an installation that looks at the country’s ‘disappeared’ by encasing photographs and objects that belong to the missing persons in an amber-like substance. These ‘memorials’ will be arranged in a designated space to evoke the feeling of walking through a graveyard. The short film Fight Hate With Love, created by Andrew Michael Ellis and Mediastorm, follows young black American Michael Tabon, caught up in a cycle of imprisonment but now focused on promoting his message of community, love and …

2015-04-17T14:12:35+00:00

BJP Staff