All posts filed under: Awards

How Felix von der Osten won the undergraduate series award 

Last summer, German photographer Felix von der Osten made a road trip to the US, travelling through places such as South Dakota and crossing the border into Montana. It was here, towards the north of the state that he came across the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, home to two Native American tribes – Gros Ventre and Assiniboine. This is where he would make his series, The Buffalo that could not Dream, which has won the undergraduate series category in BJP’s Breakthrough Awards. “I had never seen anything like this before, nor did I know anything about this place,” says von der Osten, who is studying a BA in photography at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Dortmund, Germany. “My idea of Native American people was a very romanticised one, from books I’d read. [After arriving at Fort Belknap] I became interested in this place.” Von der Osten explains how he ended up living on the reservation for a month towards the end of 2014, and says that his images reflect what he saw while he was there and the people he met. The two tribes are historically enemies he explains, but were forced to …

2015-05-29T21:24:20+00:00

How Tim Pearse won the graduate single image award  

This image may look simple, but a lot of time and craftsmanship has gone in its creation. It is a lith print, made by Tim Pearse, a former BA photography student at Plymouth College of Art. And it is with this image that Pearse won the singles prize in the recent graduate category of the BJP Breakthrough Awards, which was judged by BJP editor Simon Bainbridge, photography curator Leo Scott, and photographer Laura Pannack. Working exclusively with analogue and alternative photographic processes, Pearse crafted the image as part of a longer untitled series of lith prints. “I wanted to create a discourse on constructed memory through the perception of ambiguous form,” says Pearse. “I wanted to illicit the asking of questions of self… we can look at any object or place and it generate something intangible within ourselves.” Pearse took the image on a Mamiya RB67 camera loaded with Ilford Delta 100 film, and printed it as a lith print using lith developer, which gives the image its soft, hand-drawn quality, he says. “I learnt this process while I was at university and have worked with it ever since. I like being part of every point in the making of the photograph, and being able to have …

2015-05-26T16:00:03+00:00

From Ultra-Orthodox Jews Celebrate Purim in Mea Shearim 2014 © Gili Yaari

Gili Yaari photographs the Purim celebration in Ultra-Orthodox Jerusalem

When Gili Yaari was a child having a kickabout with friends, and his father walked past after a long day’s work and patted the top of his head with those giant hands, coarse from the hours spent mending leather goods in a workshop, the sadness that engulfed him wasn’t always apparent because, as a young boy, what Yaari saw was his Dad’s sweet face, his tender gaze. The fact that his father was a Holocaust survivor wasn’t immediately apparent because he was, after all, a survivor – a provider, a worker, a lover, a Dad. “I grew up in what seemed like a ‘normal’ house. My parents emigrated to Israel from Hungary, and they integrated into society, worked for their living and managed to raise a family. It was only when I grew up that I understood I was actually raised in a house where there was no happiness, where joy was illegitimate, where fear and survival were a driving force,” says the Israeli photojournalist of his upbringing in Beit-Shmesh, a suburb of Jerusalem. That …

2015-05-22T15:24:32+00:00

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Winners of BJP Breakthrough Photography Awards announced

BJP

German photographer Felix von der Osten scooped the Undergraduate Series Award for his documentary project The Buffalo that could not Dream. Currently studying BA Photography at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Dortmund, this ongoing project began in the summer of 2014 when he spent time living with the community of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Montana. British photographer Adama Jalloh won the Undergraduate Single Image for her street portrait of a young boy in south London. Taken from her ongoing series You fit the description, the work reflects on the frequency of police stop and search operations targeting young black and asian men. Jalloh is currently in her final year of BA Commercial Photography at Arts University Bournemouth. Tanya Houghton took the Graduate Series Award for This Must Be The Place, which uses folded and re-photographed landscape images to explore contemporary cartography and the unseen lines of our journeys. She is currently studying for an MA in Photography and Urban Cultures at Goldsmiths University, London. Finally, artist and portrait photographer Tim …

2015-06-09T11:59:04+00:00

BJP Breakthrough – what are the judges looking for?

The deadline for the BJP Breakthrough award has been extended. You now have until 11 May to submit your work! We’ve designed this award to connect the next generation of photographers with the established photography industry. Four winners will have their work exhibited in East London, published by the BJP, and will also receive a state of the art Olympus E-M10 camera.  For full details go to our dedicated BJP Breakthrough website. But what are we looking for from the entrants? Laura Pannack, the British social documentary and portrait photographer who has won prizes at the World Press Photo, The Sony World Photography Awards, The Magenta Foundation and Lucies IPA, says: “I’m looking for something that strikes me emotionally. It needs to have concept and aesthetic to equal measure. I want to be inspired and feel like the image has a personal relationship to the photographer. An image that start a conversation and show the passion and interest of the image makers curiosity and creativity.” British Journal of Photography’s Editorial Director Simon Bainbridge, who has guided the magazine for the last 11 …

2015-05-07T10:50:14+00:00

Taro Karibe: “Any desire can be satisfied in Tokyo”

“I gave Taro the prize because he was honest,” says the Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol of the Japanese photographer Taro Karibe. “Working as a salary man, but longing so much to explore the core of his existence. Karibe came top in a Tokyo workshop with Sobol, run by the Magnum Photos agency for his image exploration of Tokyo, both a “utopia, where any desire can be satisfied, and a dystopia, filled with something threatening.” Karibe says. “Instead of focusing on the great photograph and looking for tricks to improve, he started a search within himself – using the camera as a tool to express his own inner life,” Sobol says. “He started taking pictures to ask questions instead of trying to give answers. He put himself at stake and invited myself and the other students into his private universe. “And he did it with soreness and honesty at the expense of the magnificent.” Taro speaks to BJP about his Magnum workshop: Why did you decide to sign up to the Magnum workshop? I had realized I had some limitations with …

2015-05-12T13:15:29+00:00

Naoto Akimoto lived in a homeless shelter in poverty stricken Japan

Naoto Akimoto is featured as part of a BJP partnership with Magnum Photos after he came top-of-the-class in a Tokyo workshop with Bruce Gilden. Gilden hosted one of three workshops in collaboration with The Nippon Photography Institute in Shibuya, Tokyo. costing 150,000 yen (£843.71) for each participant, where he provided mentoring to develop students’ storytelling through daily shoots; with the aim of gathering a project by the end of the week. Gilden selected the final portfolio of Akimoto as the best – he won a Fujifilm camera, the Fuji X100T. “Initially Naoto showed me quite pedestrian documentary photographs that I think he took at a homeless shelter in Yokohama,” says Gilden. “I told him that I thought he had to get much closer. When he showed up two days later with new images from the same place, the class and I were astounded. “He had done a masterful job: he was much closer and had exposed the men’s souls. This, combined with his hard work and dedication – he was spending all night at the shelter – make quite …

2015-05-01T16:53:46+00:00

A photographer’s epic journey across India

“This story you cannot tell, only recording the work as it is,” says photographer Vasantha Yogananthan. In a black blazer, black jeans, black cardigan and a floral shirt, Vasantha Yogananthan is as mellifluous as his photography. Scans of these – slate and rainbow squares on cream paper – lie fanned on the table. The 29-year-old Paris-based photographer has just gained the resources to develop his epic seven-book project, A Myth of Two Souls, which we discuss at the BJP office in Old Street, London. He’s won a £5,000 grant in the international category of the IdeasTap and Magnum Photographic Award, after finishing in the top three of 823 applicants. He is in a good mood. “The challenge is: how do you tell this story for people in the West?” says Yogananthan, whose mother is French and father is Sri-Lankan. “People will see the pictures and miss what the project is about. We are working on finding an editorial strategy where we can invite the audience to discover India the same way I am discovering it.” The project is to …

2015-05-12T16:18:07+00:00

Ciarán Óg Arnold wins First Book Award

A project called I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed. but all I could do was to get drunk again, by Irish photographer Ciarán Óg Arnold, has won this year’s First Book Award. Born in 1977, Arnold has spent almost his whole life living his pictures in the town of Ballinasloe. The project, taken over the past five years, shows drunken knuckle-fights, hard men’s tears and derelict homes as the active participants in a post-recession landscape. “I never really had a project in mind,” Arnold tells BJP. “I just took the photographs at weekends to have something to do. The photographs are about this fatalistic atmosphere of male negativity. Machismo, and having nowhere to express it. I wanted to show how something feels, how it looks – to get the emotional desperation and the anger. I’ve never really talked about it with anyone before. It’s hard. “You would go into one nightclub on weekends, there’d be no one in the entire place except for these guys in the corner with the boxing machine, getting out their aggression …

2015-05-05T13:24:50+00:00

Diana Markosian wins Chris Hondros Fund’s first Emerging Award

Diana Markosian, the Armenian-American photographer best known for her stunning revisitation of the Beslan massacre, has been awarded The Chris Hondros Fund’s first Emerging Award. “This so much more than an award for me. Chris was a friend. He supported me from the first day we met,” Markosian tells BJP.  “I want to up my game and create something even more personal. I owe it to him. ” Markosian met Chris Hondros when she was a graduate student, before the photojournalist was killed alongside Tim Hetherington on 20 April 2011 while on assignment in Libya. She will receive a $5000 grant from the organisation, which will go toward her next project. “My work comes from within,” Markosian says of her developing photography career. “I am constantly searching for a moment of silence between myself and whatever it is I am photographing. It is an emotional process that transcends anything else I’ve experienced. It is ultimately an expression of myself: all of my feelings, revealed in a moment, in an image.” “There is a sensitivity and compassion to the …

2015-04-27T15:19:07+00:00

BJP Staff