All posts filed under: Awards

Awards: The White Man’s Hole by Antoine Bruy scoops D&AD Next Photographer

“The White Man’s Hole is a work about the town of Coober Pedy, in the South of Australia, and is the second chapter of an ongoing project called Outback Mythologies, about the Australian Outback and its importance for the Australian identity.” So Antoine Bruy describes his latest work, which won the Next Photographer Award at the D&AD Festival 2017, run in partnership with Getty Images. “Choosing a winner was difficult, but Antoine Bruy showed a level of originality and technical expertise that raised the bar for the competition,” commented Andy Saunders, one of the judges and senior vice president of creative content at Getty Images. Coober Pedy is a sun-drenched town in South Australia, better known as “the opal capital of the world”. The precious mineral was first found there in 1915 and extracting it remains the major source of income for the locals – who, to protect themselves from the extreme heat of their location, live mostly underground. Bruy went Coober Pedy after spending a year in Australia, and says he was “astonished by the surreal landscapes” the first time he went, adding “it …

2017-05-09T10:18:14+00:00

Report: Why Souvid Datta’s image theft is the least of the problem

It’s the scandal of the season – a young Anglo-Indian photographer Souvid Datta has been caught stealing other photographers’ images and claiming them, or elements of them, as his own. The story broke on 03 May, when PetaPixel published a story alleging Datta had taken a figure included in an image shot by Mary Ellen Mark on Falkland Road, Bombay 1978, and copy-pasted it to one of his own shots. Datta then renamed the person Asma and claimed Asma was a veteran sex worker friends with a 17 year old fellow sex worker, who he also named and who is also clearly identifiable in the photograph. The article included damning and pretty inarguable compare-and-contrast shots of the two images, and by 04 May, Time LightBox editor Olivier Laurent had managed to get an interview with Datta in which he confessed to this and other misdemeanours – such as taking images by Daniele Volpe, Hazel Thompson and Raul Irani and passing them off as his own, and cloning and restitching multiple components of his own images together. “I foolishly doctored images,” stated the …

2017-05-09T12:44:17+00:00

Awards: Daragh Soden wins the Grand Prix at Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography

“Dublin is the city I grew up in, I wanted to make work about me but also about the youth in Dublin today,” says Daragh Soden. “I approached young people in the streets of Dublin and asked them if I could take their photograph, and allowed them to stand as they wished. The idea was to champion the youth of Dublin today, to celebrate them and also revisit my own youth.” It’s a deceptively simply premise for a project that’s already brought him international success – last year the single image prize in the undergraduate category of BJP‘s Breakthrough Awards, and now the Photography Jury Grand Prix at the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography. Judged by a prestigious panel including photographer Tim Walker, gallerist Michael Hoppen, agent extraordinaire Camilla Lowther, and curator Robin Muir, the win means that Soden will stage a solo exhibition of his work at next year’s festival, a €15,000 grant from Chanel, plus a €5000 grant for the Janvier photo lab. Soden was selected from a shortlist of ten photographers, which also included …

2017-05-09T12:49:15+00:00

BJP’s search for the world’s best emerging talent

BJP

We’re offering students and recent graduates an opportunity to showcase their work and launch their careers. Our judges will select four outstanding photographers to have their work presented in a group exhibition in East London, be published on BJP’s print, online and digital platforms, and receive expert advice on launching a successful career in photography. Now in their third year, the Breakthrough awards have a great line-up of judges this year – Emma Lewis, assistant curator at Tate Modern; Diana Markosian, photographer at Magnum Photos; Emma Bowkett, director of photography at FT Weekend Magazine; Vivienne Gamble, director at Seen Fifteen Gallery & Peckham 24; Maisie Skidmore, online editor at AnOther; Juno Calypso, Artist, Hayley Louisa Brown, Founder & editor of BRICK magazine, and Lisa Farrell, head of exhibitions & events at British Journal of Photography. So what does it take to impress them or win Breakthrough? Further below, we’ve put together a series of articles and a short video to help you get the best out of your entry. These include helpful information and tips on what the judges are …

2017-05-05T15:18:16+00:00

Interview: Salvatore Vitale, winner of PH Museum 2017 Grant, on How to secure a country

How to secure a country investigates the abstract concepts of border and security in one of the most heavily armed countries in the world. It’s a striking, forensic series, and it won Salvatore Vitale the first prize in the PH Museum 2017 Grant. Vitale started work on the project back in 2014, after Switzerland voted against mass immigration – resident in Switzerland for ten years, he was originally an immigrant from Italy. During his research, the word ‘security’ started to jump out, along with ‘border’ and ‘protection’ , he says, so he decided to try to visualise the concepts; it took him a whole year to get access to the security system, and when he did, “fate wanted it to be a border guard”. His images are clean and often deliberately devoid of people, an aesthetic that deliberately suits the topic and the country. It’s “an aseptic, almost clinical language that is part of Swiss culture”, he says, adding: “I rarely show people, because it was more important for me to show the dynamics of how the system works. It was …

2017-05-02T17:11:47+00:00

Awards: Salvatore Vitale wins the PHM 2017 Grant

“Salvatore Vitale’s extraordinary project How to secure a country is a forensic examination of national security in one of the safest countries on the planet. This work challenges the concept of power and control, shining a light on wider issues of mass migration and fear,” says Emma Bowkett, director of photography for the FT Weekend Magazine and a jury member for the PH Museum 2017 Grant this year. Along with Sarah Leen from National Geographic, Ihiro Hayami from Tokyo Photography Festival, and the photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg, she picked out the Italian photographer for the top prize, for his project exploring the National Security Program in Switzerland, his adopted home. Two years in the making, the series has been funded by a Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia grant, and Vitale has scooped £7000 by winning the PH Museum prize. “Salvatore Vitale has managed to gain access to one of the most difficult places to photograph; border control,” comments Hayami. “He tries to capture, or examine, the abstract concept of security through the fragments of scenes and successfully presents, …

2017-04-27T15:01:55+00:00

Breakthrough Awards: 2016 winner Simone Sapienza has a spectacular year

Simone Sapienza won the Undergraduate series prize at the Breakthrough Awards 2016 with an astonishingly assured debut, Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers. Shot in Vietnam, it explores a country that effectively defeated the US in an exhausting war, then adopted unbridled capitalism to become a new Asian tiger. “Vietnam was all built in my imagination but just thanks to the cinema, through movies like Apocalypse Now,” Sapienza explains. “I was curious to see what the country that defeated the US looked like.” It was a precocious start for someone just leaving university, but then Sapienza had already made inroads into the photography world the year before, launching the Gazebook Sicily Photobook Festival in 2015. It’s now in its third year, and has hosted photographers as well known as Martin Parr. After graduating from Newport, Sapienza returned to Sicily, where he joined the Minimum photo studio, which he runs with our other members. It’s an “atypical and transversal” place, he says, through which the photographers organise events and create new photo projects individually and collectively; it’s also based in …

2017-04-27T14:21:01+00:00

Frederik Buyckx wins the Sony World Photography Awards

Frederik Buyckx has scooped Photographer of the Year at this year’s Sony World Photography Awards, with a series called Whiteout that explores how nature is transformed by winter.  “I have chosen a series of landscapes so that we may return to the essence of looking at photography,” comments Zelda Cheatle, chair of judges at Sony’s World Photography Organisation. “Landscape is often overlooked but it is central to our existence. I hope this award will inspire many more photographers to take pictures that do not simply encompass the terrible aspects of life in these troubled times but also capture some of the joys and loveliness in each and every environment,” she continues. Buyckx’s work, which was picked out from 227,00 entries by photographers from 183 countries, was shot in remote areas of the Balkans, Scandinavia and Central Asia, where people often live in isolation and in close contact with nature. “There is a peculiar transformation of nature when winter comes, when snow and ice start to dominate the landscape and when humans and animals have to deal with the extreme weather,” …

2017-04-20T23:03:13+00:00

Breakthrough Awards: how to impress judges Diana Markosian, Juno Calypso and Hayley Louisa Brown

BJP

“I like it when you can tell they had fun making it, that they did it for themselves before anyone else,” says photographer Juno Calypso. “That criteria probably doesn’t apply well to documentary projects but I take pictures of myself in wigs and tacky lingerie, so what do I know?” She’s a fast-rising star in photography who launched her career with a series of self-portraits playing a fictional character named Joyce, but she’s also helping out as one of the judges of this year’s BJP Breakthrough Awards. She likes underdogs and “a photographer or a subject that isn’t already over-represented in the history of photography”, she says but, having been on the other side of the fence, adds that she knows how scary it can be to enter a prize. ”I know how it feels to place all your hopes into a single competition,” she says. “I don’t want to make lazy decisions [when judging]. What I will say though, is even if you do get rejected – keep applying or just do your own …

2017-04-26T10:44:43+00:00

Breakthrough Awards: Jan McCullough one year later

It was while leafing through a 1950s manual for military wives she’d found in a secondhand shop that photographer Jan McCullough came up with the title for Home Instruction Manual. The innovative project, which explores the concept of the ideal home, scooped the Northern Ireland-based photographer first prize in the Graduate – Series category of last year’s BJP‘s Breakthrough Awards. Renting an empty home for a month, she decorated it according to contemporary DIY advice she found online and photographed the results in a deadpan, deliberately amateurish style. For the Breakthrough group show in East London’s Truman Brewery, McCullough decided to include a huge roll printed with this advice alongside her pictures. Showing her work in this way kickstarted an interest in more experimental exhibition strategies, and McCullough has discovered “an enthusiasm for the possibilities of a physical installation in a gallery context”. “I’m interested in developing this aspect of my practice, considering new ways to present my work specific to its subject,” she continues. “I want to play around with how my installations could …

2017-05-08T15:30:24+00:00

BJP Staff