All posts filed under: Awards

25 artists shortlisted for Contemporary African Photography Prize

Founded in 2012 by Swiss artist Benjamin Füglister, the Contemporary African Photography Prize aims “to raise the profile of African photography and encourage a rethinking of the image of Africa”. Open to photographers from anywhere in the world whose work engages with the African continent or its diaspora, it picks out five winners every year and shows their work at major photography festivals around the world. This year 800 photographers entered, of whom 25 have made it to the shortlist.

2018-03-28T14:49:21+00:00

Winner of the BJP International Photography Award 2018 Announced

The winners of the International Photography Award 2018 are Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter & Tobias, who have won with their series The Merge, an in-depth exploration into artificial intelligence and robotics, which aims to explore and visually interpret the possibility that we are living inside a simulation. Having shared a studio but worked separately for several years, Sara, Peter and Tobias came together to start a collaborative creative studio in 2013. “Coming together gave us room to experiment,” Sara explains. “We each wanted to move away from the conventional shape and form of documentary or editorial photography. Then we realised that if we wanted to do things differently, and wanted something different to happen, we needed to do everything differently, so we came together as a collective.” Since forming their collective, Sara, Peter and Tobias have made a name for themselves with their first project and photobook, Phenomena. This debut project was an anthropological study of UFOs and extraterrestrials, and was exhibited at Rencontres d’Arles and nominated for Prix de la Photo Figaro. It introduced …

2018-03-27T09:40:06+00:00

Shortlist announced for MACK’s First Book Award

From mass shootings to a family hotel – the shortlist for the 2018 First Book Award is nothing if not eclectic. Set up in 2012 to support emerging talent, the First Book Award is open to previously unpublished photographers who have been nominated by an international panel of experts, and previous winners include Irish photographer Ciarán Óg Arnold, Polish photographer Joanna Piotrowska, and Malagasy photographer Emmanuelle Andrianjafy. The ten shortlisted photographers this year come from all over the world, including Indian photographer Tenzing Dapka, Japanese photographer Hayahisa Tomiyasu, and Australian photographer Lionel Kiernan. 

2018-03-23T12:26:15+00:00

Portrait of Britain People’s Choice: I think my portrait records something a little more potent than all the selfies that clog up my sister’s iPhone

Josh Adam Jones is a Photography student at UWE in Bristol. Last year, his ongoing series, ‘99 Peace Walls’, was published on BJP. The project was made up of portraits of young people living in Belfast, a city that is still healing its old political and religious wounds. Josh’s interest in social documentary has developed in his last two years of studying. His People’s Choice portrait of his younger sister was taken as a test for an upcoming trip to Muscat, Oman, where Josh will be shooting expatriate communities. Josh has always considered community and family dynamics when shooting, and the portrait of his sister reflects both his pride in her, and a sibling spat; his sister Leah hates the portrait. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? I entered a number of portraits into Portrait of Britain this year – a selection of stand alone images as well as work from my ongoing series ‘99 Peace Walls’, which was published on …

2018-04-03T16:51:16+00:00

When shooting portraits, I often feel awkward, and I invite that awkwardness to begin with: Harry Flook on creating a compelling portrait

Harry Flook is a Bristol-based writer and photographer, whose photographic work is rooted in his personal experiences. Having left his own religious faith, he embarked on ‘Apostate’, a project photographing those who had done the same, and he stumbled across a vast community of ex-religious individuals while doing so. Making this work then culminated in another project, ‘Beyond What is Written’, set in the heart of ‘bible belt’ America and addressing the subject from a different perspective. Both series explore the concept of community outside religion, for people whose sense of community was once constructed by the religious groups they were a part of. Harry entered a portrait from ‘Apostate’ into Portrait of Britain last year, and it was displayed across the country as part of our nationwide exhibition. We spoke to Harry about the value of awkwardness, choosing the perfect subject, and creating a compelling portrait. How did you create your selected portrait, and what was the story behind it? This portrait was shot as a test for a project I’m still working on, …

2018-03-21T10:43:21+00:00

We wanted to question whether the world we’re living in could actually be a simulation: Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter and Tobias on their IPA-shortlisted series

Peter, Sara and Tobias met while attending the Fatamorgana School of Photography in Denmark, where they now share a studio. They made a name for themselves with their first project and photobook, Phenomena, in 2015. This debut project, an anthropological study of UFOs and extraterrestrials, was exhibited in 2016 at Rencontres d’Arles and nominated for Prix de la Photo Figaro. Since their initial collaboration, the collective has developed a conceptual and subjective approach akin to documentary, which considers issues founded on theories and first-person accounts, rather than fact. How did come together as a collective? Sara: We’ve all shared an office together for the last six years, and we came together to start our first series, Phenomena, three years ago. We all struggled doing our own personal work alongside our businesses, so collaborating was a way of shaking up our professional lives. Coming together gave us room to experiment. It’s about finding the space and projects that let us do things the way we want to, instead of being governed by other people’s interests or …

2018-03-16T12:27:01+00:00

This was a highly personal and difficult project for me to make: Lauren Forster on her Portrait of Britain People’s Choice portrait and intimate series

Lauren Forster is a photographer and lecturer in Lens Based Media at The Arts University Bournemouth. Her work addresses sociological issues and the human condition. Many of her projects have maintained a particular focus on religion, illness and disability. Her most personal series, ‘Ground Control to Mother Hen’, documents family life since her mother’s secondary brain cancer diagnosis in 2016, which has now been rendered inoperable. The series captures strength and fragility during dark moments of pain, struggle and loneliness. The resulting images offer an intimate insight into this period of loss and transition. Forster’s portrait was selected by BJP’s editorial team as one of their favourite weekly Portrait of Britain entries. It was then voted as the People’s Choice favourite by Facebook users, becoming our first weekly winner. The portrait depicts Forster’s father in his Salvation Army uniform. Since his wife’s diagnosis, he has given up his life’s work serving as a missionary in Africa to care for her in the UK. This portrait reunites him with the sense of purpose and identity that …

2018-04-03T16:54:32+00:00

World Press Photo selects six emerging South American photographers

“There is no shortage of visual talent around the world, but some people are better known than others,” states World Press Photo. “To develop a new and more diverse visual representation of the world, we need to locate, recognise and share the best work.” With this in mind it launched the 6×6 Global Talent program, which aims to flag up six new talents drawn from one of six continents every three months. The first 6×6 flagged up six photographers from Southeast Asia and Occeania in November 2017; this time the focus is on South America and the selected image-makers are: Oscar B Castillo (Venezuela), Fabiola Ferrero (Venezuela), Luján Agusti (Argentina), Pablo Ernesto Piovano (Argentina), Felipe Fittipaldi Freire de Carvalho (Brazil), and Tamara Merino (Chile).

2018-03-12T12:32:24+00:00

Often, western media institutions are only interested in recognising work that reflects their own culturally appropriated view of the east: Poulomi Basu on being shortlisted for the International Photography Awards

The series draws on contemporary documentary practices to reflect the bewildering atmosphere of the region, using pictures of foreboding landscapes and festivities alongside images of locals uncovering crime scenes. Basu hopes the project will shed light on real narratives from the east, and force western viewers to see India without their cultural preconceptions. Basu has become known for documenting women’s experiences in isolated communities and conflict zones. In 2017, her series A Ritual of Exile was shortlisted for the Tim Hetherington Trust Visionary Award, and also earned her the Magnum Emergency Fund grant in 2016. Last year, Centralia was shortlisted for the Mack First Book Award.          Can you tell me about your IPA shortlisted series Centralia? Centralia is the tale of a fractured landscape in extremis. It’s about the shifting planes of reality: an India of the mind, a place both hyper real and metaphorical; familiar yet alien. Centralia is a passage deep into the forests of central India where a little known and under reported conflict between a Maoist guerrilla army and the …

2018-03-09T10:20:04+00:00

I had to go back to vaults of difficult memories that I would have gladly put behind me: Paulina Otylie Surys on her IPA shortlisted series

The nightmarish series delves into the phantoms of her early childhood, growing up during the Polish People’s Republic. Using archival photographs of family scenes and portraits taken during the period, Surys combines Communist motifs, like ornate Soviet rugs, with unnerving images of red meat. The project marries nostalgia with fear, alluding to the memories of hardship experienced during the occupation through the eyes of a child. Surys is a multi-disciplinary artist who merges the boundaries of photography, painting and mixed-media installation. Her projects are often autobiographical in nature, maintaining a focus on womanhood, memories and the development of society. Dreamatorium merges many of Surys’ interests and methods, using collage and digital manipulation to corrupt familial scenes. Can you tell me about your IPA shortlisted series, Dreamatorium? Although most of my projects have a slight autobiographical element to them, Dreamatorium is a particularly personal, cathartic project for me. It presents a hazy, oneiric, distorted world seen from the perspective of a child. To make this happen, I had to go back to vaults of difficult memories …

2018-03-09T09:55:38+00:00

BJP Staff