All posts filed under: Awards

Winner of the Unseen Dummy Award announced

Amsterdam’s annual celebration of photography Unseen Photo Fair closed for the year earlier this month, but not before showcasing some of the most interesting work in contemporary photography. During the fair and festival, Yoshinori Masuda won the Unseen Dummy Award for his photobook, Tiger 2. For his project, the Japanese photographer visited a zoo to depict two tigers in a state of repose, hinting at ideas around the dangerous state of nature and the  unsettling power of the gaze. Much of Masuda’s thinking behind Tiger 2 was influenced by an eclectic jumble of high-minded influences, including mathematical laws and scientific theories, but he was initially prompted by the simplest of reasons: “I was attracted by [the tigers]. Therefore I photographed them.” Masuda was immensely grateful for receiving the award, but as he tells the BJP, the most pleasing aspect of the award is the larger audience the prize affords: “I just want people to have the book in their hands, and enjoy it until it falls apart.” Masuda was chosen by an international jury, consisting of …


Winner of the ING Unseen Talent Award announced at Amsterdam’s Unseen Photo Fair

Yesterday marked the official opening of Unseen Photo Fair, the Amsterdam festival organised by Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam, Platform A and Vandejong Creative Agency, with exhibitions, events and awards taking place all over the city. Beginning with a bang, the winner of the ING Unseen Talent Award has been announced, with Luxembourger photographer Sophie Jung receiving a project production fund of €10,000. The ING Unseen Talent Award is a joint initiative between Dutch financial institution ING and Unseen, providing an international platform for new Belgian, Luxembourg and Dutch photography talent to present their work to an international audience. Jung was chosen from a shortlist of five finalists, who spent the past two months working on a photograph based on the theme ‘Who are we here for?’:  Lara Gasparotto, Olya Oleinic, Sébastien Bonin, Sophie Jung and Sjoerd Knibbeler. The jury was comprised of curatorial professionals from across the industry, including Frits Gierstberg (Curator, Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam), Kaat Celis (former Chief of Photography, De Morgen and founder of visual management company Sluitertijd), Sanne ten Brink (Head Curator, ING Collection), Duncan Forbes (Director …


Amira and her Children by Ivor Prickett © Ivor Prickett/UNHCR/Panos Pictures

Shortlist for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2015 announced

Four photographs have been shortlisted for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2015, the major international photography award organised by the National Portrait Gallery, London. Beginning in 1993, the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize has become the National Portrait Gallery’s signature exhibition, attracting contemporary photographers around the globe and offering extensive exposure to seasoned photographers and talented amateurs. The prize will be announced on the 10th of November 2015, with the first prize winner receiving £12,000. The shortlisted portraits include: Hector by Anoush Abrar is inspired by the dramatic chiaroscuro lighting of Baroque paintings. The Iranian-born Swiss photographer was strongly influenced by Caravaggio’s work, particularly his painting Sleeping Cupid from 1608. Abrar explains: “Somehow I needed to make my own Sleeping Cupid. I found my portrait of Hector so powerful and iconic that it inspired me to continue this project as a series called Cherubs.” Ivor Prickett’s photograph Amira and her Children, of a displaced Iraqi family who had fled their village near Mosul after Isis took control of the area. The documentary photographer has …


Image © Joseph Ball

See the winners of BJP & theprintspace’s Showcase Competition


This year Joseph Ball, graduate of the BA photography programme at Falmouth University, was selected as the best in show at the Free Range Graduate Shows by BJP’s editorial director Simon Bainbridge. In addition to Ball, photographers Nic Rue and Ross Parker were highly commended.  Despite only recently graduating, Ball’s work is self-assured, focusing on the way images are absorbed in contemporary society and how that affects man’s relationship with the natural world. “There’s a constant onslaught of information through advertising and television and the internet and social media, so I’m reacting to that in my own way just by shooting impulsively at things I find strange. “Then I layer process upon process onto these images and leave artefacts of each process behind to hint at this confusion and just how deceptive and other-worldly images can be.” His grainy, bleakly monochrome photographs push the limits of an image’s capabilities to draw the viewer’s attention to the deceptive qualities of photography. “If you look at something like Google Street View, there are these seemingly objective presentations of …


Transnistria Conglomerate © Anton Polyakov

Finalists revealed for top Boundaries prize at Zagreb’s Organ Vida photography festival

Organ Zida, the impressive new independent photography festival from Zagreb, Croatia,  has announced the ten finalists to compete in their main prize, orientated around the theme of Boundaries. Each of the finalist’s photography whose photography will be presented at the main festival exhibition, at the Klovićevi Dvori Gallery in Zagreb from the 3rd to the 18th September 2015. The exhibition is the central tenant of a diverse offering of photography from the only documentary photography festival in the Balkans. Sorting through over 300 projects from 47 countries was no small feat for the international panel of judges, consisting of photography heavyweights such as internationally-acclaimed photographer Roger Ballen, editor of Aperture magazine Michael Famighetti, Dutch photographer and publisher Rob Hornstra, Italian photographer and former World Press Photo winner Alessandro Imbriaco, British photographer Hannah Starkey and Croatian academic and photographer Sandra Vitaljić, as well as BJP editor Simon Bainbridge. Rob Hornstra says of the judging process: “The way the finalists distinguish themselves is because they go beyond registration and make a personal interpretation of theme they are working on. There is …


Call for entries – BJP’s International Photography Awards 2016


British Journal of Photography’s annual International Photography Award is now open for entries, offering the winners the chance to show their work at TJ Boulting, an innovative gallery in the heart of Fitzrovia, central London. The winners will also have their work printed and framed by one of Europe’s leading professional photography labs, theprintspace. Now in its 10th year, the IPA has established itself as one of the photography world’s leading showcases for new work, with last year’s series winner, Dominic Hawgood, attracting rave reviews in The Guardian and Time Out. This year’s elite judging panel, drawn from the worlds of photography, art and media allow entrants to get their work in front of the most influential people in the industry. This year’s panel includes: Kate Bush, head of photography at Media Space within The Science Museum, London Sean O’Hagan, photography critic at The Guardian and The Observer Emily Graham, culture & education manager at Magnum Photos Bruno Ceschel, founder of Self Publish, Be Happy and photobook expert Hannah Watson, director of Trolley Books and TJ …


Svetlana Shutkina: the photography novice learning from Magnum experts

Earlier this year, Magnum Photos collaborated with The Nippon Photography Institute to hold international workshops for promising young photographers, in partnership with the BJP. The workshop were led by three leading Magnum photographers, each of whom have produced a book in Tokyo at points of their career: Bruce Gilden (Go), Jacob Aue Sobol (I, Tokyo), and Gueorgui Pinkhassov (Sightwalk). Russian amateur photographer Svetlana Shutkina was selected from the attendees for the Fuji Camera Award, winning a Fujifilm X100T camera . Pinkhassov, whose 1996 series collected stolen moments of everyday Tokyo life, said that selecting a winner was a tough task, but Shutkina’s work and unique story was too good to ignore. “Svetlana’s case is a special one,” he says, “[as] a native of Chabarovsk she resides in Tokyo. Initially Svetlana hesitated to join because she could not speak English and was a complete novice in photography… [but] the more professional a photographer, the less flexible she/he is.” For Pinkhassov, a Magnum member since 1991, the secret lies in “letting go and letting an image come …


Registration XP15431, Photograph, Circa 1901. Alice Springs, Northern Territory. Institution: Museum Victoria / Amoonguna, Northern Territory. June 2014. Image © Christian Vium, from the series The Wake.

Images 1-5: Sir Baldwin W. Spencer and Frank J. Gillen photographs are from the collections of the Museum Victoria and South Australia Museum. The repurposing of the images and the views expressed in the work are those of the author alone and in conjunction with community consultation

The re-enactments of Aboriginal history that won the Tokyo International Photography Competition

A series that includes portrait ‘re-enactments’ of archival images of Aboriginal people has won this year’s Tokyo International Photography Competition (TIPC). The Wake: Re-enacting the Spencer & Gillen photographic archive by Danish photographer Christian Vium was selected from eight shortlisted entries to be awarded the Grand Prix. Vium, who is a photographer, filmmaker and anthropologist, made his winning work in Central Australia between May and June 2014. His aim, he explains, was to creatively respond to the photographic archives of anthropologists and photographers Frank Gillen and Baldwin Spencer, who produced a comprehensive record of aboriginal life between 1875 and 1912. At the time, Vium had been researching the Spencer & Gillen archives at the Victoria Museum in Melbourne via the online digitised collection, “I wanted to revisit their cardinal work and use it as a point of departure for a contemporary dialogue about how we see and represent ‘the Other’,” says Vium in a statement about his work. “I went into the field with a selection of photographs divided into three categories: the portrait, the …


The angels of lot (Gli angeli di lot), 2008. From Sodom and Gomorrah © Alessandro Bavari

Alessandro Bavari – in the belly of the beast

There are many disparate moments in Alessandro Bavari’s childhood that inform the artist he is today – watching tadpoles hatch, the first time he walked into a Gothic church in Burgundy, losing grip of a balloon and seeing it bob away, meeting its fate against a rose bush. He says these impressions are so profound – a sensation, a feeling of wonder, a sound – they occasionally crop up in his work. Bavari uses mixed-media techniques to create a unique body of work that incorporates both photography and film. He often draws on literary influences, offering his own interpretation using model sets, organic objects, photography and digital manipulation. The results are often macabre, and sometimes irreverent. His ongoing series, Sodom and Gomorrah, is one such unique fusion of media. “Sodom and Gomorrah was first conceived 15 years ago. I was inspired by Invisible Cities, a novel by Italo Calvino, written and published in the 1970s, but which he cultivated over many years through travel notes and reflections, and organised by themes – the five senses, …


From 1800 Millimètre © Emi Anrakuji

Emi Anrakuji – ‘1800 millimetres. It’s the size of my bed’

The elusive Emi Anrakuji. Her work seems to have exploded onto the photography scene in early 2000, attracting the attention of Daido Moriyama in 2004. “He was very much impressed,” says Emi, whose body of work is a series of self-portraits in which she often focuses on the most intimate details of her anatomy while simultaneously concealing her identity. It’s this contradiction that obfuscates the viewer. Legs splayed, crouched on a bed on all fours, a finger inserted into her vagina – the self-portraits in 1800 Millimètre, Emi’s latest body of work, “are not erotic at all,” she says. “1800 millimetres is just the size of my bed.” A bed to which she was confined, which came to represent her world – the very world from where her work originated. “It’s work that came out of my sickbed.” In 1800 Millimètre, Anrakuji poses nude, in solitude, in close shadowy settings – the confines of her bedroom staged for the gaze of a lens. She describes herself as “an alchemist of images”, blurring the contrived and the authentic …


BJP Staff