All posts filed under: Documentary

Photobook: Tokyo is Yours by Meg Hewitt

Born in 1973 in Sydney, Meg Hewitt got into photography after studying sculpture and painting. She’s since reached the finals at the prestigious Moran Prize for Contemporary Photography and the Maggie Diaz Photography Prize for Women, and won a silver medal from the Prix de la Photographie – among other accolades – and exhibited her series Tokyo is Yours at Place M Gallery in Tokyo last year. This year, it will be shown again at the Voies Off, Les Rencontres d’Arles’ fringe festival, alongside work by her mentor, Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol. Shot in Japan over two years, Tokyo is Yours is inspired by manga, surrealism and film noir, and uses a gritty monochrome that Hewitt first experimented with back in Sydney, where she was founding director of the 10×8 Gallery from 2012-2014. “When I started shooting on film I couldn’t afford to process colour, so I would develop black-and-white film myself in the bathroom,” she says. “It was a natural progression to shoot at high ISO with a flash, and pushing the film then created part of the aesthetic. It emphasises …

2017-05-25T12:37:33+00:00

Mathias Depardon on hunger strike against detention by Turkish authorities

On 06 May Mathias Depardon was in good spirits – on assignment in South East Turkey for National Geographic, he updated his Facebook with a post reading “Diyarbakir I m in town. My boots are muddy and I m a bit smelly but can surely be of a good company tonight for a beer.” By 08 May his assignment had turned sour, with Turkish police arresting him in Hasankeyf, Batman Province, and detaining him in a police station for 30 hours. There the police are thought to have come across his images of members of the banned PKK (Kurdistan Workers’ Party) via social media, leading to charges that he had created “propaganda for a terrorist organisation” – charges which Reporters Sans Frontiers’ Turkish representative Erol Önderoğlu has described as “absurd” and “designed solely to justify his arbitrary arrest after the event”. From the police station Depardon was taken to a detention centre operated by the National Department for Migration, an interior ministry offshoot, in the city of Gaziantep – and, despite an order for his deportation issued on 11 May, …

2017-05-25T10:00:29+00:00

Q&A: J A Mortram on his ten-year project Small Town Inertia

J A (or Jim) Mortram was born in 1971, and studied art in Norwich. In his third year of college he dropped out to become the primary carer for his mother, who has chronic epilepsy, in a small market town in Norfolk called Dereham. In 2006 he started shooting people in and around Dereham, focusing on those facing disadvantages and social exclusion, and went to create a blog called Small Town Inertia, featuring his images and their words. The blog was critically acclaimed early one, and in 2013 Mortram was one of BJP‘s Ones to Watch. Mortram has made publications of three of his stories with Cafe Royal Books, and is now finalising a photobook called Small Town Inertia, which will be published by  Bluecoat Press in June. BJP: When did you get into photography? J A Mortram: About seven or eight years ago, in the months before I started the Small Town Inertia blog. It both saved and completely transformed my life. After years of being a carer for my disabled mother, I’d become highly marginalised. Being a carer …

2017-05-25T10:42:29+00:00

Obituary: Stanley Greene, photojournalist, 1949-2017

“You know how good a flower smells when you have smelled death,” Stanley Greene once told Clement Saccomani, the managing director of the Noor agency Greene had co-founded in 2007. A cornerstone of contemporary photojournalism and storytelling, Greene died this morning, facing his disease as he faced his life – fighting. Born in Brooklyn in 1949 to two actors, Stanley was a member of the Black Panthers and anti-Vietnam War activist as a teenager, and first got involved with art through painting. Turning to photography, he shot an epic project on San Francisco’s punk scene over the 1970s and 80s, naming it The Western Front. After meeting W. Eugene Smith, Greene turned to photojournalism, first working as a temporary staff photographer for the New York Newsday and then starting to photograph for magazines. In 1986 he moved to Paris and began covering world events. By chance, in 1989, he was in Berlin as the Wall fell. He shot an image titled Kisses to All depicting a tutu-clad girl with a champagne bottle, which came to symbolise the sense of liberation at that moment. In the early 1990s, Greene went to Southern Sudan to document …

2017-05-19T17:43:19+00:00

How to shoot the perfect portrait: Liz Hingley, a Portrait of Britain 2016 winner

“Taking someone’s portrait is always a disruptive and often very awkward event. Everyone has their default portrait pose. The role of the photographer is to push beyond, to find that mysterious intimate moment that only a camera can freeze.”

2017-05-24T15:20:34+00:00

BJP Staff