All posts filed under: Documentary

Workers’ playtime as the Fotomuseum Winterthur takes on hobbies

“The Hobbyist is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between photography and hobby culture, focussing both on the photography of hobbies and photography as a hobby,” write curators Pierre Hourquet, Anna Planas and Thomas Seelig of the forthcoming show at the Fotomuseum Winterthur, The Hobbyist – Hobbies, Photography and the Hobby of Photography, which opens on 08 September. It’s a fair but also deceptively simple summary of this intriguing show, which is backed up by a busy events programme and a magazine (in place of a catalogue). “A phenomenon as diverse and participatory as the hobby can hardly be tackled through a classical exhibition alone,” write the curators, and the magazine reflects some of this diversity, including images by photographers such as Alberto Garcia-Alix, Bruce Davidson, Alec Soth, Mike Mandel, Ricardo Cases, and Kirill Golovchenko, vintage adverts for TVs, cameras and videotape recorders, an extract from Theodore W Adorno’s test The Culture Industry, a Q&A with Jeremy Deller and Alan Kane on their Folk Archive, and essays by contemporary cultural theorists such as Olivia Baeriswyl, Therese Steffen, and Doris Gassert.

2017-08-29T22:27:33+00:00

Jack Orton’s oblique take on architecture and the built environment

The 22 year-old has shot Poundbury and Milton Keynes, among others, to pick out how we shape the environment – and how it then shapes us. “I quickly realised the importance of human presence within these urban environments; how we change them over time and how the environment changes us.”

2017-08-25T15:38:39+00:00

Montreal’s Momenta Biennale and the unreliability of the image

For its 15th birthday, North America’s leading photofestival takes on a new name. Momenta: Biennale de l’image is designed to denote a more studied approach than the previous Month of Photography identity and is entirely in keeping with the direction of the festival – in recent years, under the creative direction of artists, curators and academics including Joan Fontcuberta, Paul Wombell and Marie Frase, it has addressed themes such as the ‘post-photographic’ condition and the impact of automation in image-making. This year’s invited curator is Ami Barak, a French visual authority.

2017-08-22T09:42:52+00:00

Any Answers: Joel Meyerowitz

The camera is like a divining rod and I have lived my life letting instinct show me what I am interested in, says Joel Meyerowitz, who quit his job in advertising in 1962, after seeing Robert Frank at work. A native New Yorker, he became known for his early colour work on the city streets

2017-08-25T15:27:26+00:00

20% off Street London symposium for BJP readers

“I’ve tried to create something different to the other Street Photography events out there, this is a kind of AGM for the Street Photography Community,” says Nick Turpin. “There’s a lot of talk about how to take street photographs, we’re moving the conversation on to why to take street photographs. The modern resurgence of street photography is maturing and we want to explore where it is going. Our guest should end the weekend educated, inspired and maybe a little hungover.” Turpin is a well-established street photographer and founded the In-Public street photographers’ collective in 2000. He’s joined forces with Observe Collective’s Jason Reed and Hoxton Mini Press to launch Street London, a street photography symposium taking place just off Brick Lane this weekend at the D&AD Building, 64 Cheshire Street, London E2 6EH. The weekend features a range of talks and events including a photo walk with Dougie Wallace, talks from 16 street photographers, a free print swap, a book fair, and a party. The speakers include: Stephen McLaren, co-author of the best-selling book Street …

2017-08-17T10:29:37+00:00

Getxophoto Festival probes post-global society from 31 August

“Where are ‘we’ going as a collective society?” That’s the question posed by this year’s Getxophoto Festival, back for its 11th edition under the stewardship of new artistic director, Bilbao-born Monica Allende. The festival, which opens on 31 August and runs until 01 October 2017, comprises 20 main exhibitions, many of them outdoors, and a lively programme of activity and events unfurling around the coastal town of Getxo in the Basque country. “‘Transitions’, the theme for the next three instalments of the festival, starts from the idea that we are entering “a period of post-globalisation”, says Allende, a former photo editor at The Sunday Times. “This concept has been on the fringes of debate for some time but is gathering momentum in mainstream discourse. “We see its effects through increased polarisation of political debate around the threats of climate change, the refugee crisis and the rise of nationalist populism. This is a moment of major uncertainties, where the status quo of the state and global free-market agreements are being questioned as solutions for a balanced …

2017-08-15T15:31:54+00:00

Rifles, surveillance and civilians in Kratsman’s The Resolution of the Suspect

“I have to be scared, because the moment I’m not scared it might be dangerous.” Miki Kratsman has found himself in a number of difficult and dangerous situations over the course of his 33 year career photographing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In that time, he has repeatedly changed his approach to create different narratives, showing not only the danger in the region, but those brave enough to stand up to the attacks, the pernicious nature of surveillance and latterly creating a Facebook community to share news of what has happened to the subjects of his photographs.

2017-08-25T15:27:56+00:00

Pittsburgh 1950, a long-lost portfolio by Elliot Erwitt

Elliot Erwitt was just 22 years old when he was commissioned to shoot Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by the legendary Roy Stryker in 1950. Stryker had won fame and lasting respect for his work with the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s, commissioning photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans to shoot America’s rural heartland at the height of the Depression; by 1950 he was working with a new organisation, the Pittsburgh Photographic Library, charged with shooting the formerly industrial, notoriously polluted city as it transformed into a modern metropolis. Stryker had met Erwitt when the youngster was still studying in New York, and had commissioned him to work on a Standard Oil project alongside photographers such as Berenice Abbott, Gordon Parks and Russell Lee. The young image-maker must have impressed him because, when invited to document Pittsburgh by the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, Stryker commissioned Erwitt and – unusually for him – gave him free reign to shoot what he liked. Erwitt shot on the project for a year, until he was drafted into …

2017-08-14T15:36:22+00:00

Any Answers: Donald Weber

“I’ve just about had enough of photojournalism. What I find most disheartening is the staunch anti-intellectualism; an almost complete lack of self-awareness, with severe consequences in today’s world of ‘alternative facts’. We don’t trust what we see. Why is that?” asks Donald Weber, originally a trained architect but now a leading thinker with four photobooks to his name

2017-08-14T14:39:53+00:00

BJP Staff