All posts filed under: Editions

#BJP 7858, cover shot by Daisuke Yokota

#BJP 7858: Scratching the Surface

What do Daisuke Yokota and Thomas Mailaender have in common? On the face of it very little, with the Japanese artist specialising in ethereal, fine art installations, and the French provocateur in deliberately jokey tattoos, pottery and chicken runs (complete with live chickens). “Society puts too much pressure on us to be perfect when in fact everybody smells bad in the arse,” says Mailaender; “If you look around there are so many extraordinary artists and, when I compare, I have done nothing,” says Yokota. “If I burn out now, I was not good enough.” But if you look a little deeper, the two artists are both concerned with the fragile materiality of the photograph, and the alchemic process that transubstantiates mundane subjects into the sacred and the profane. So we’ve put their work together this issue, and added images by artists with similar concerns. Alejandro Guijarro’s Lead, for example, which uses an x-ray machine to illuminate the hidden layers of Old Masters; or Raphael Dallaporta’s Chauvet – Pont-d’Arc, L’inappropriable, a study of prehistoric cave sketches which …

2017-02-28T16:09:13+00:00

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#BJP 7857: Habitat

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“I wanted to offer up experiences concerning the complexity of our existence on the planet,” Louise Clements, director of the Format festival, told BJP of its theme this year – Habitat. “Climate, migration, technology: they all seem to be accelerating and the consequences are quite momentous. “We are impacting the geology of Earth. It was important to me to do something vital. As a festival, we’re not just here to celebrate the achievements of the artists: we also want to have some kind of impact.” She’s gathered together work by more than 300 artists that fits the theme – along with Hester Keijser, co-curator of the lead exhibition Ahead Still Lies Our Future – and BJP is proud to have partnered up with Format to present our take on some of their shows. We interview Clements and Keijser about the thinking behind their investigation of the Anthropocene; we interview the photographer John MacLean about his project Hometown, which saw him tracing the origins of image-makers such as John Baldessari, Richard Long, William Eggleston and Ed Ruscha. …

2017-02-02T15:31:29+00:00

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#BJP 7856: Tales of the City

“It’s my sexiest project, for sure,” says Richard Renaldi of his latest photobook, Manhattan Sunday. Shot late at night and early in the morning in New York’s clubs, it’s a portrait of a nocturnal playground, peopled by free spirits. Renaldi moved to New York in 1986 and immersed himself in its clubs; 20 years later, he still enjoys a night out dancing, but set up a large format camera and tripod to shoot his series, on the dance floors and on the streets nearby. It was, he says “a little nutso, given the liability issues….but fun”. Renaldi’s series is BJP’s latest cover story, in an issue which explores many other facets of urban life. Dayanita Singh’s shots of factories in her native India offer a very different view of the city, for example, recording a country in flux as its manufacturing goes post-industrial. Fred Mortagne’s book Attraper Au Vol, meanwhile, show how skaters adapt rigid cityscapes to their own design, re-imagining the spaces and their possibilities. Meanwhile Mark Neville also explores how the environment is reshaped through play, shooting …

2017-01-31T11:46:29+00:00

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BJP’s Portrait Issue 2016, with Portrait of Britain

The magazine also includes longform features on Nadav Kander’s most recent portraiture series, Charlie Kwai’s stunning London street photography, and the picture editors of some of the world’s top magazines. After settling in Kentish Town, North London, Kander established himself as on the most in-demand commercial portrait photographers in the world – taking iconic pictures of people like Barack Obama and Desmond Tutu, David Beckham and David Lynch. In 2009, Kander started to work on more conceptual, landscape-orientated series. His series Yangtze, the Long River won the prestigious Prix Pictet, while his series Dust, which documents sites of Soviet nuclear testing on the border between Kazakhstan and Russia, and Bodies, a series of nudes covered in marble white dust, were exhibited at London’s Flowers Gallery. Daily Presentations is his latest series, a mediation on modern Britain, through a series of serendipitous portraits of strangers. Charlie Kwai is a self-described shy man, who began his life as a photographer by taking landscapes. That changed when the London-based artist started to walk the streets of his hometown, …

2016-10-06T16:31:06+00:00

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Editor’s Introduction: The Migration Issue (BJP #7851)

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This issue of BJP focuses on the European migrant crisis which, over the last couple of years, has seen a surge of people entering the continent. Many are refugees fleeing conflict, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees stating that in 2015 49% of those arriving from the Mediterranean came from Syria, 21% came from Afghanistan, and 8% from Iraq. Even so, attitudes in Europe have hardened, and photography has played a sometimes dubious role in fostering that colder climate. Upon Googling ‘refugee children’, Patrick Willocq found hundreds of pictures that looked the same, he tells BJP – “people on beaches, children crying, very little humanity.” His response, created for Save the Children, was to collaborate with young refugees and reflect their mental state instead, and the same sense of humanity runs through the other projects we’ve featured. “It’s no longer about making people aware of the migrants’ movements. They know,” says Alessandro Penso. “It’s now something else, something more personal, something about empathy.” In taking this approach, these photographers open themselves up to …

2016-09-08T13:21:33+00:00

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#BJP 7850: The Education Issue

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“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it …

2016-08-04T10:54:28+00:00

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#BJP 7849: Modern Myths

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If photography is indexically tied to the present moment, the past presents something of a challenge. Yet the features gathered here this month all draw on ancient customs and legends – from The Ramayana and The Bible to Greek mythology and traditional festivals held in Valencia and the Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico. What these projects record isn’t the past but the way that that the past lives on; old narratives that continue to inform lives that are also shaped by technology that would once have seemed like science fiction. And these series also show how photographers and their subjects can subvert and evolve these ancient stories, whether by using traditional carnival characters to question modern gender roles in Central America, or Classical statues to consider Western depictions of female nudes. If everything in the present day has evolved from something that went before, photographers can tunnel back through time by carefully selecting what they look at. How does our front cover fit in? Taken from Leslie Moquin’s project Shanghai Cosmetic, it seems to …

2016-07-05T13:36:20+00:00

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The Talent Issue: Ones to Watch 2016

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Our latest issue, Ones to Watch, is available to buy now from The BJP Shop. Find it in the App Store from 3 May and in shops from 4 May. Since 2011, we’ve dedicated an issue of BJP to identifying the best emerging talent in the photographic world – the image-makers poised for international success and set to loom large in the industry for years to come. In our annual Talent Issues, we’ve featured over 100 photographers who have gone on to firmly establish themselves in their respective fields, shining a spotlight on the work of photographers such as Diana Markosian, Max Pinckers and Mariela Sancari. This year, we’ve asked a global panel of 60 experts – including Martin Parr, Erik Kessels, Bruno Ceschel, Elizabeth Avedon and more – to nominate sixteen photographers they think represent the future of photography. The panel – made up of editors, curators, educators, gallery owners, festival directors, writers and photographers – have all weighed in and represent the full spectrum of the photographic community. We present the photographers set to make noise in …

2016-06-08T10:57:10+00:00

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BJP #7847: Shooting on Assignment

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In our latest issue, we look at what might just be the photographer’s holy grail: creative commissioned work. We’re seeing more brands take an enlightened view on imagery, allowing photographers the freedom to create cutting-edge work. It’s available to buy now. REBIRTH OF A BRAND Upon joining the brand in 2012, Kenzo’s creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon recognised that striking photography was the key to revitalising the French-Japanese brand. They look for collaborators with a strong point of view and allow their style to come through, employing the likes of Lorenzo Vitturi, Jean-Paul Goude and Synchrodogs to make cutting-edge adverts, branded content and lookbooks. The pair tell Jessica Gordon how they used photography to solidify Kenzo’s quirky new voice. “WE SAID, ‘WHAT CAN WE DO THAT WOULD INJECT SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AND OFF-KILTER AS YOU’RE FLIPPING THROUGH A MAGAZINE BUT STILL HAVE THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE BRAND WE WERE BUILDING?’”   NORTHERN SOUL Alasdair McLellan has carved out a world-class career with his elegant fashion and portrait photography, fusing references as myriad as …

2016-04-28T17:16:53+00:00

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