All posts filed under: Events

From the series Cafe Lehmitz © Anders Petersen

Festivals: Alberto Garcia-Alix curates PHotoEspaña 2017

“Anders Petersen, Pierre Molinier, Antoine d’Agata, Teresa Margolles, Karlheinz Weinberger, Paulo Nozolino, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin produce a work outside of orthodoxies where emotion is everything,” states Alberto Garcia-Alix. “They take their great strength from their capacity for transmission and empathy. “Like a spark. An intense current of excitement. We convulse. We fill ourselves with resonances. The comprehension of the universe as the last act. That is the great subliminal power that art has. The exaltation of the being.” The Spanish photographer, known for his raw portraiture and involvement with the hedonistic post-Franco La Movida Madrilene, has been given free reign to curate PHotoEspaña’s 20th edition, and has taken a radical approach. Celebrating “work that lives outside the norms because it feeds off what is most intimate and passionate in the author”, he’s selected cult and obsessive projects, many of which have an element of sexual subversion. He finds “exaltation takes flesh as a catapult for the senses” in d’Agata’s scenes of sexual encounter for example, and “fierce hedonism and independence” in Molinier’s fantastic and fetishistic …

2017-04-27T14:36:55+00:00

Tokyo compression 18
, 2010. From the series Tokyo Compression © Michael Wolf, courtesy Prix Pictet

On show: Prix Pictet ‘Space’ at the V&A

Founded nine years ago by Swiss private bank the Pictet Group and Candlestar – the company behind Photo London, which opens a fortnight later – the prize draws attention to environmental issues but also reflects the strategies and approaches used by photographers to tackle socio-political concerns. The first edition, in 2008, was themed Water and was awarded to Canadian photographer Benoit Aquin for his photo essay The Chinese Dust Bowl, while Munem Wasif was commissioned to shoot a story on water shortages in his homeland, Bangladesh. Over subsequent years more conceptual approaches have been shortlisted in response to changing themes, which have included Power, Consumption and Disorder, won by Lucas Delahaye, Michael Schmidt and Valérie Belin respectively. “The intention was never to just feature photojournalism, much as we all love it,” says Michael Benson of Candlestar. “It was about opening up to all genres of photography.” This year’s Prix Pictet comes through on that promise, with a shortlist that includes a wide variety of work. Sergey Ponomarev’s series Europe Migration Crisis is classic photojournalism, for …

2017-04-26T12:49:09+00:00

Untitled from the series 'grass, peonie, bum' 2016 © Maisie Cousins, courtesy TJ Boulting gallery which will show it at Photo London

Photo London returns with a new, more edgy focus

Spring is in the air in London and for the first time this year the sun is shining on the courtyard of Somerset House. Michael Benson, one of the two founding directors of Photo London, sits in its centre, drinking a morning coffee and soaking up the rays. He could be forgiven for feeling a little smug but today he seems merely quietly content that later this month the art fair will be back for its third edition, its biggest yet. “We kept hearing from people that ‘there’s no market for photography in London, there’s no interest’,” says Benson. “These were people in the industry and they should have known better.” In fact, the fair established itself as a key fixture on the international photography calendar and soon this grand old courtyard and the labyrinthine rooms of Somerset House will be filled with gallerists, collectors, artists, curators and exhibitors once again. Last year’s edition featured 84 galleries from 19 countries, welcoming more than 35,000 visitors over its five-day run, with collectors and VIP photography professionals …

2017-04-25T13:11:53+00:00

Los Alamos series, 1965-1968 © Eggleston Artistic Trust, Memphis, Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

On show: Autophoto at Paris’ Fondation Cartier

By the end of the 19th century, the camera and the car had helped pave the way for a new, more modern perspective – images by freezing time, from multiple perspectives, and automobiles by speeding things up. Now the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in Paris is devoting a huge exhibition to the two, showing how they have altered our lives and our visions of them – and how they continue to evolve. As curators Xavier Barral and Philippe Séclier comment: “Over the last few years we have witnessed an industrial, societal and environmental turning point in automobile history. On the other hand, photography has never been shared so much.” With the automobile and the camera, they explain, everyone can be in action in space and in time – cars providing almost everyone, everywhere, with autonomy and movement, and the photography allowing them to record their presence in history. “It was time to unify these two popular techniques, which have transformed the social bond into an artistic journey,” say the curators. “And this is the first time that a photographic exhibition of this magnitude has been organised on this theme.” …

2017-04-20T17:05:34+00:00

Offspring Photo Meet © Mimi Mollica, courtesy of the artist

Meet the experts: Offspring Photo Meet returns to Hackney

“If you want to get your work seen and your talent celebrated you should look no further!” says Mimi Mollica, photographer and founder of the Offspring Photo Meet. “Photo Meet has become the hub photographers needed in London. With portfolio reviews, talks, workshops, projections, great offers and our beefed up Best Portfolio Award, the two-day event will be fun and inspirational.” Launched in 2015, Photo Meet returns to Hackney’s Space Studios on 12 and 13 May with a stellar lineup of photo experts, including a portfolio review including experts from Tate Modern, British Journal of Photography, The Photographers’ Gallery, The Observer, FT Weekend Magazine, Vice, and agencies, production companies, galleries, and publishers. Rising photographic stars Juno Calypso and Francesca Allen will join Tate Modern curator Shoair Mavlian on Friday evening to discuss making work in the internet era, plus rewriting the boundaries of the representation of sex, gender and identity. Jörn Tomter and Luke Archer will host the Saturday Beer O’Clock, presenting their self-produced and self-published magazines, Loupe magazine and I love Chatsworth Road. Laura El-Tantawy show her new …

2017-04-18T14:07:33+00:00

40/place which does not exist © Tomasz Laczny, courtesy of the artist

Tomasz Laczny on “helping refugees spread their forgotten stories”

Tomasz Laczny’s work is rough and striking – striking enough to have caught the tutors’ eyes at the BJP x Magnum Photos workshop on Storytelling, Collaboration and Advocacy earlier this year. The workshop was a theme close to Laczny’s heart because he’s both shot refugees and helped them depict their own lives, and because his preferred medium is the photobook. His project 40/place which does not exist was shot in a refugee camp in Dakhla, Algeria, and looks at the Saharawi, “exiled people living in the Sahara desert and waiting 40 years to go back home”. The resulting book, which he brought to the workshop, juxtaposes shots showing the harsh reality of daily life in the camps with satellite photos showing their isolated position in the desert, “to highlight the fragile existence of the people suspended in this non-place”. It received an honourable mention at the Dummy Award Kassel 2016. While working on 40/place which does not exist Laczny decided to run a photographic workshop for young people living in the camps, “to help them to spread to the world their forgotten story”. …

2017-04-10T11:42:59+00:00

Laskhmi, 14, in her chhau. She sleeps on heaps of hay stack. Her mother told me Uma did not tell anyone when her periods started in fear she would be sent to exile. When they found out after the third day, because she ran out of cloths to wear and hide her bleeding, she was punished and made to sleep on nothing but hay in the family's animal enclosure. This marked her coming of age. Basti, Achham, Nepal, 2016.

On show at Format: Poulomi Basu’s A Ritual of Exile

It’s illegal, and a tradition that puts women at great risk, but despite this has been normalised, accepted and passed down through generations. In parts of Nepal, a practice called Chhaupadi dictates that women who are menstruating, and those who experience bleeding after childbirth, must live in makeshift huts because they are considered impure and therefore untouchable. Exiled by their communities and families, the women are refused access to water and toilets and must eat food scraps, fed to them as though they were animals. They are exposed in every sense, vulnerable to rape, abduction and assault, and even death from asphyxiation caused by the fires they are forced to light in their tiny, inadequately ventilated huts. In 2013, photojournalist Poulomi Basu travelled to Surkhet District in a remote region of Nepal to meet and photograph some of these women, assisted on the ground by the charity WaterAid. Appalled and outraged by what she saw, she vowed to return. “The first trip was so short and I was frustrated because I realised the scale of …

2017-04-04T11:36:21+00:00

Home Instruction Manual exposed at Seen Fifteen Gallery © Jan McCullough, courtesy of the artist.

Breakthrough Awards: Jan McCullough one year later

Jan McCullough won first prize in the Graduate – Series category of BJP‘s Breakthrough Awards last year with Home Instruction Manual, an innovative project exploring the concept of the ideal home. The title came from a 1950s manual for military wives the Northern Ireland-based photographer found in a secondhand shop; renting an empty home for a month, she decorated it according to contemporary online advice, and photographed the results in a deliberately amateur style. Winning a spot in the Breakthrough group show in East London’s Truman Brewery, she decided to include a huge roll printed with this advice in her installation. Since then, the project has had a high-speed trajectory. “Shortly, after winning Breakthrough, I was really happy for my show in Seen Fifteen Gallery London to be nominated for the Deutsche Börse Photography Award, and my book shortlisted for the Arles Book Award,” she says. “I have been installing my work in several solo show and group shows [over the past year], such as the Format Festival in Derby, Landskrona Museum in Sweden, Belfast Exposed Photography Gallery and The Library Project in …

2017-03-28T10:39:48+00:00

Joel Meyerowitz
Couple au manteau camel sur Street Steam, New York, 1975. Avec líaimable autorisation de líartiste et de la Howard Greenberg Gallery

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Joel Meyerowitz
Camel Coat Couple in Street Steam, New York City, 1975. Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Festivals: what’s on at Arles 2017

It’s the biggest, most prestigious photography festival in the world and it’s back – Les Rencontres de la Photographie in Arles opens on 03 July and closes on 24 September. It’s the 48th edition of the festival, which has seen seismic changes in the last few years – the departure of its long-standing director Francois Hebel after the 2014 edition, and the arrival of his replacement, Sam Stourdze, the backing of the influential LUMA Foundation, and the Cosmos-Arles book fair. This history and reputation mean Arles is able to pull in the big names, which this year means including solo shows by Joel Meyerowitz, Michael Wolf, Gideon Mendel, Masahisa Fukase, Alex Majoli and Roger Ballen; plus an exhibition on Surrealism organised by Le Centre Pompidou and including works by Hans Bellmer, Erwin Wurm and Rene Magritte. Arles also uses its might to showcase lesser-known names and regions, however, and one of the themes running through the 2017 edition is Latina!, a celebration of work from South America in four separate shows. Urban Impulses is a group …

2017-04-04T11:35:47+00:00

From the series The Canary and the Hammer © Lisa Barnard

Festival review: what’s hot at Format

In August of 2016, at the International Geological Congress in Cape Town, one of the world’s leading scientists declared we were living at the dawn of a new geological epoch – the human-influenced age. This new era, termed Anthropocene, replaces the current epoch, the Holocene, the 12,000 years of stable climate since during which all human civilisation developed. Format International Photography Festival in Derby, the UK’s largest photography festival, opened this weekend for its eighth edition, aiming to explore this notion of the Anthropocene by asking photographers to respond to the word “habitat”. Featuring more than 200 international artists and photographers across 30 exhibitions, the biennial is situated across independent cinema and exhibition spaces such as Quad, University of Derby and the Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The festival’s flagship exhibition, titled Ahead Still Lies Our Future, is on show at art space Derby Quad, and features work by ten photographers, brought together by curators Hester Keijser and festival director Louise Clements. “I wanted to offer up experiences concerning the complexity of our existence on …

2017-03-28T11:46:25+00:00

BJP Staff