All posts filed under: Exhibitions

A Dream In Green, 2015 © Juno Calypso

Winners of the BJP International Photography Awards 2016 announced

BJP

The International Photography Awards 2016 exhibition will be showing from the 25th February to the 12th March 2016 at London’s TJ Boulting gallery. Juno Calypso won the Series Award for Joyce, a collection of performative self-portraits that reflect on “modern rituals of seduction and the laboured construction of femininity.” The 26-year-old graduate of London College of Communication was chosen from over 1,500 entrants by a judging panel including The Guardian’s photography critic Sean O’Hagan, Self Publish, Be Happy founder Bruno Ceschel, TJ Boulting’s Hannah Watson and BJP’s Executive Editor Diane Smyth. As a photography student, Calypso spent her loan to fly to “the middle of nowhere in Pennsylvania,” alone, to picture herself in the state’s honeymoon hotels.   “I began staging these photographs three years ago, using my grandma’s bedroom as the set, or a room found on Airbnb,” Juno tells BJP. “The idea always starts with the location – finding somewhere with a time-warp feel. This year I went to stay alone at a couple’s honeymoon resort in the US to continue the project. So it begins with an appreciation …

2016-02-04T17:52:48+00:00

Blood and Rose, Tokyo, 1969 Albertina, Vienna; permanent loan of the Austrian Ludwig Foundation for Art and Science ©  Matsu Estate, courtesy | PRISKA PASQUER, Cologne

Between Protest and Performance – Unseen Photographs of Japan’s 60s New Wave

Japan’s most influential photographers – including Daidō Moriyama, Yutaka Takanashi, Shōmei Tōmatsu, and Nobuyoshi Araki – are shown together for the first time in Provoke, a new exhibition at The Vienna-based Albertina museum, which explores the significance of the short-lived and revered magazine of the same name. Seen from today, Provoke is an expression of the massive social turbulence in Japan’s recent history, a country uniquely scarred by the Second World War, and in the throes of creating a new national identity. The 200 works on show therefore represent an expression of this political transformation and new ways of using photography as a form of protest; to express, or even inspire, such fundamental change. In the 1960s, Japan started to see the first great wave of protests against renewal of diplomatic ties with the USA, to the illegal actions of large corporations and the despotism of the neoliberal Japanese state. As the protest movements intensified, so a series of photographers, with the ability to publish their work, began to emerge. As well as expressing the social unrest of their generation, these photographers were also …

2016-02-01T17:28:31+00:00

Flavinia - Miss Africa Dream Picture

Sistaaz of the Castle: fashion dreams of Cape Town’s trans sex workers

Dutch photographer Jan Hoek and fashion designer Duran Lantink have always shared an interest in working with models that are different. In his documentary photography, Hoek’s subjects range from homeless people who “look like kings” to heroin addicts with a modelling dream. Lantink uses amateur models in his shows, while employing unconventional design techniques and recycled fabrics to symbolise the different layers of society. Discovering the powerful, unique looks of South Africa’s transgender sex worker community was a coincidence, but one that instantly captured both their imaginations. In Sistaaz of the Castle, Hoek and Lantink zoom in on six girls from transgender support group Sistaazhood, part of the Cape Town sex workers’ organisation SWEAT. Shot under a bridge beside the capital’s castle – the closest thing to a home for most of the girls – Hoek’s photographs show the realities of their lives in parallel with the extraordinary inventiveness that goes into creating their customised outfits. The images express a different story, one that focuses on the girls’ intuitive sense of fashion, rather than the hardships …

2016-01-28T14:15:43+00:00

01_ Press Image l Saul Leiter, Snow, 1960 copy

Ordinary Beauty: Revisiting Saul Leiter’s pioneering images

During his lifetime, Saul Leiter (1923–2013) was something of the ignored artist of American photographic history. While his career spanned a time when quintessential New York street photography was defined as swift, sharp and precise, Leiter’s leisured, impressionist style went against the grain. Leiter was a pioneer of colour photography, adventurously using Kodachrome colour slide film well before the likes of William Eggleston and Joel Meyerowitz. As the Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan wrote in Leiter’s obituary, “[his photographs] are as much about evoking an atmosphere as nailing the decisive moment.” A retrospective of the late photographer’s work has just began at The Photographers’ Gallery; the first major public show of his work in the UK features more than 100 works, including early black-and-white and colour photographs, sketchbooks and related materials.     While Leiter’s early black-and-white images were published in LIFE magazine and exhibited in New York and Tokyo, he quickly moved into fashion photography, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, British Vogue, Esquire and more. When I speak to Brett Rogers, director of the Soho gallery …

2016-01-27T14:16:44+00:00

From Laróyè, 1980-2000

Finding transcendence through the image: the work of Mario Cravo Neto

The work of Mario Cravo Neto has long been under-appreciated on British shores. Despite long being a celebrated figure of contemporary Brazilian photography at home and abroad – having exhibited extensively in South America and the United States as well as at the Recontre d’Arles – the photographer, who died in 2009, hasn’t been exposed to British audiences to the same extent. The first UK solo exhibition of his work has recently gone on show at London’s Autograph ABP, under the auspices of the gallery director Mark Sealy and guest curator Gabriela Salgado. I visited the gallery as the show was being installed as Salgado explained what makes Mario Cravo Neto such an essential figure in Brazilian art. “MY IDEA FROM NOW ON IS TO DEVELOP THAT TRANSITION BETWEEN THE INERT OBJECT AND THE SACRED OBJECT. IT IS SIMPLY A RELIGIOUS POSITION IN PHOTOGRAPHY THAT I WISH TO ADOPT.” – MARIO CRAVO NETO Cultural tastes may have had a part to play in his long absence from these shores, with Cravo Neto’s idiosyncratic studio portraits …

2016-01-21T19:16:55+00:00

David Oyelowo, actor

BAFTA portraits of the British film industry’s unsung talent

At the end of January, BAFTA will be opening the doors to its historic Piccadilly headquarters to showcase a new photography exhibition. British photographer Phil Fisk was commissioned to shoot BAFTA: For the Love of Film, a series of portraits of the skilled professionals working in the industry today. While the cream of British acting and directing sits for Fisk – including David Oyelowo and Stephen Frears – he digs deeper and pays tribute to the essential cinematic talent behind the camera whose contributions aren’t celebrated as widely. Fisk shoots them in their working environment, giving us an insight into the numerous roles involved in pulling a feature film together. Fisk shoots cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Interstellar, Spectre) with his camera casually slung atop his shoulder; casting director Nina Gold (The King’s Speech, The Imitation Game) is pictured with a pair of pom-poms made from the shredded remains of actor’s headshots; and we see production designer Jacqueline Abrahams (The Lobster, The Look of Love) inside her office, with reference books, magazine …

2016-01-20T16:56:04+00:00

From the series 25 Weeks of Winter (2) © Ekaterina Anokhina

London Art Fair’s Photo50: The Fascination of Dealing with the Other Sex

Each January, London Art Fair dedicates exhibition space to photography, inviting a curator to select 50 images along one common idea. The 2016 edition of Photo50 at LAF (which runs at Business Design Centre, 20-24 January) is curated by BJP contributor Federica Chiocchetti, whose theme is ‘Feminine Masculine: On the Struggle and Fascination of Dealing with the Other Sex’. She explains her interest in curating an exhibition that grapples with the mysterious dynamics that operate between men and women. – BJP “It is absurd to divide humanity into men and women. It is composed only of femininity and masculinity.” Valentine de Saint Point ‘Manifesto of the Futurist Woman in response to F. T. Marinetti’, 1912 “In the end every definition of male and female is personal, and it’s that idiosyncrasy we value, need and hope to encourage. Who do we think we are? A work in progress ♂♀”. Vince Aletti, ‘Male Female’, 1999 ‘Feminine Masculine’ presents an unfinished and personal exploration of the dynamics between the opposite sexes. This mysterious topic, at times ineffable and immaterial, often seems …

2016-01-18T18:05:40+00:00

Francesca Woodman, Untitled, 1977-1978
© Betty and George Woodman

On Being an Angel: finding Francesca Woodman in the otherness of her self-portraits 

The American photographer Francesca Woodman is regarded as a defining voice of her generation. Although she was a teenager when the main body of her work was completed, Woodman is now talked of as the Sylvia Plath of photography, both in terms of her cultural attitude and the workings of her art. Yet, unlike the poet Plath, Woodman remained almost completely unrecognised throughout her short, tragic life. Indeed, her rejection from the established industry of the time may have contributed to her horribly sad death. In the autumn of 1980, at the age of 22, Woodman was forced to move in to her parent’s home in Manhattan after surviving a suicide attempt. The adopted New Yorker, who had started her life in the frontier town of Boulder, Colorado, had begun to suffer from depression, in part due to the failure of her work to attract attention. She had sent her portfolio of self-portraits to magazines across New York, and been uniformly ignored. Then, an application for funding from the National Endowment for the Arts was rejected. On January 19, 1981, soon after her relationship to her partner disintegrated, …

2016-01-21T11:44:37+00:00

Barricade made from barrels, 1916

Historic photojournalism depicting the growth of Irish nationalism

“The Irish can’t forget their history because the English refuse to remember it,” says Luke Dodd, quoting renowned academic Terry Eagleton. If that’s true, it’s something Dodd hopes to change with an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery devoted to Ireland’s rebellion against British rule. The Easter Rising 1916: Sean Sexton Collection depicts the growth of Irish nationalism, the uprising of 1916, the subsequent emergence of the Irish Free State, and how it all played out in images. Dodd, who has just edited a book of Jane Brown’s photojournalism, has drawn the images from a private collection of more than 20,000 prints put together by Sexton over the last 50 years. Including press and military photographs, amateur shots and postcards, Sexton’s archive is outstanding, says Dodd, because it’s so comprehensive, but at the same time so personal. “He’s a slightly eccentric character and has searched everywhere – he’s been to every car boot sale, and voraciously collected anything Irish,” he says. “That means there’s a lot of obscure stuff, but that’s also its great strength. “There aren’t …

2016-01-12T17:34:56+00:00

© Vincenzo Montefinese

IPA 2016: Announcing the Single Image runners-up

Last month we announced the winners of the 2016 International Photography Awards, with Juno Calypso winning the Series Award for her project Joyce, and Felicity Hammond winning the Single Image Award for her image Restore to Factory Settings. Competition in the Single Image category was fierce, with over 1500 entries from 92 different countries spanning from portraiture to photojournalism, landscape to fine art. As entries were whittled down to the final few, there was spirited debate among the judging panel, which included TJ Boulting’s Hannah Watson, Magnum Photo’s Emily Graham, Tate’s Emma Lewis and photographer Ewen Spencer. This week we’ll be announcing the runners-up, starting with the Single Image category.   Vincenzo Montefinese Indelible images documenting the ongoing migrant crisis has gripped the world in the past 12 months, so it came as little surprise that this year’s IPA received several strong entries depicting scenes of broken borders and desperate families fleeing conflict. Yet Italian photojournalist Vincenzo Montefinese’s approach was different. His shortlisted image was taken in his hometown – the southern Italian city of Taranto, in which …

2016-01-12T14:06:29+00:00

BJP Staff