All posts filed under: Exhibitions

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Harley Weir’s Coming of Age at FOAM

The magnitude of Harley Weir’s success is unparalleled compared to most photographers of her age. At 27-years-old, her work has already graced the pages of AnOther, i-D, Dazed, Pop, The Gentlewoman and British Vogue. She has shot campaigns for the some of the biggest names in the fashion industry, and just produced a series of short films about creative women for Chanel and i-D’s Fifth Sense project. When Weir recently revealed her debut book Homes, containing photographs she had taken immediately before and during the clearing of the Calais Jungle, it sold out within a number of days, raising over £10,000 for La Cimade, a French charity committed to protecting and defending the human rights of refugees and migrants. The images, both disturbing and beautiful, show Weir’s commitment to the personal, shelters cobbled together with wood, rope and tarpaulin are transformed by her lens into dreamlike structures, imbued with a homely tenderness not often equated with the now dismantled refugee camp. Weir’s intimate approach is what marks her work in any context, be it a border zone …

2016-12-19T11:56:48+00:00

A young boy playing with a "pipa" (kite) on the roof of an unfinished condo. It is one of six buildings originally constructed for the middle class about 30 years ago; the mega project stopped after the construction company hit a financial crisis, and squatting started soon after. From the series Copacabana Palace © Peter Bauza

Peter Bauza shows both good times and bad at the Copacabana Palace

Copacabana Palace is a complex of six concrete shells in Rio de Janeiro’s Campo Grande neighbourhood – buildings left unfinished 30 years ago after an economic crash stalled a housing project. The name comes from the eponymous five star hotel that looks over Rio’s Copacabana Beach, but the complex is also known as “Jambalaya”, the title of a Brazilian TV show, and “Carandiru”, the Sao Paulo prison where more than 100 inmates were massacred by police in 1992. When they were first abandoned, the Copacabana Palace buildings were looted and gutted of pipes, wires and electric cables. The hall floors have collapsed in many places. One building is completely uninhabitable, but the other five house about 300 families, some of whom have been squatting there for decades. German-born photographer Peter Bauza started taking pictures of them in June 2015, often sleeping in their homes. “When I appeared, they were just surprised to see a gringo there,” says Bauza. “I told them that I had an idea, that I would like to document their daily lives – their …

2016-12-14T12:43:22+00:00

BJP Staff