All posts filed under: Exhibitions

84 toothbrushes, collected 21 May, 15 September, 27 October and 28 October 2016 © Gideon Mendel

Gideon Mendel’s Dzhangal brings the Calais Jungle to life

Gideon Mendel’s new series Dzhangal is a portrait of the Calais Jungle, told through its abandoned objects. The title is an Afghan/Pakistani Pashto word meaning ‘This is the forest’, which became the colloquial name for the migrant camp, which existed until 26 October 2016. Mendel first went to the Jungle to teach photography with the University of East London’s Centre for Narrative Research, which was running courses and programmes for camp residents. He noticed a growing sense of antagonism towards photographers, with the refugees fearing that images would hinder rather than help their efforts to gain asylum, and looked to find a way of portraying them without identifying them. He decided to turn to their discarded possessions, collecting and recording what he found and bringing it back to London. “When I first came back with a whole bunch of bags full of what looked like random rubbish, my wife thought I’d completely lost the plot,” he laughs. “She thought I’d really gone mad, finally.” Some of this ‘random rubbish’ is now being housed at London’s Autograph ABP though, part of an …

2017-01-18T11:48:37+00:00

Marli Heimann, All During an Hour, 1931/1932 by Josef Albers (1888-1976) © 2016 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Josef Albers’ little-known photocollages on show at MoMA

When Josef Albers died in 1976, the Bauhaus teacher was famous for his Homage to the Square series and his 1963 book Interaction of Color. Few knew that he had also been a modernist photographer, shooting with a hand-held Leica from 1928-32, and making a series of photocollages. When Albers and his wife, Anni, fled Nazi Germany for America in 1933, they could take only a few possessions. Anni’s father shipped over several boxes of their belongings the following year, but Albers’ Bauhaus photographs were not seen again until after his death, when Anni took Nicholas Fox Weber, executive director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, to a locked basement store near the Yale University Art Gallery. In 1988, the Museum of Modern Art hosted a modest show of 38 of the photographs. Now, four decades after their discovery, the entire collection of 70 photocollages have been published in a book – One and One Is Four: The Bauhaus Photocollages of Josef Albers – by MoMA. An exhibition of 16 of the works is on display …

2017-01-09T15:27:41+00:00

BJP Staff