All posts filed under: Film

Festival review: what’s hot at Format

In August of 2016, at the International Geological Congress in Cape Town, one of the world’s leading scientists declared we were living at the dawn of a new geological epoch – the human-influenced age. This new era, termed Anthropocene, replaces the current epoch, the Holocene, the 12,000 years of stable climate since during which all human civilisation developed. Format International Photography Festival in Derby, the UK’s largest photography festival, opened this weekend for its eighth edition, aiming to explore this notion of the Anthropocene by asking photographers to respond to the word “habitat”. Featuring more than 200 international artists and photographers across 30 exhibitions, the biennial is situated across independent cinema and exhibition spaces such as Quad, University of Derby and the Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The festival’s flagship exhibition, titled Ahead Still Lies Our Future, is on show at art space Derby Quad, and features work by ten photographers, brought together by curators Hester Keijser and festival director Louise Clements. “I wanted to offer up experiences concerning the complexity of our existence on …

2017-03-28T11:46:25+00:00

Washington Post’s Age of Walls wins WPP’s Innovative Storytelling Prize

Donald Trump’s Mexican wall may have got the headlines over the last year, but walls – in a very physical sense – are being built between nations all over the world, at a pace and urgency under-reported by the world’s most viable media organisations. “In many ways, the barrier-building is being driven by fear,“ The Washington Post wrote in the introduction to New Age of Walls, a multimedia investigation detailing each of the 63 border walls and barriers, many of them newly constructed, that are now dividing nations across four continents. New Age of Walls was the winner of the Innovative Storytelling category in World Press Photo’s Digital Storytelling contest, an award for a piece of journalism designed specifically for the online space. “Most of the new walls are being erected within the European Union, which until recently was nearly borderless,” The Post wrote. “Britain is going further, rolling up its bridges to the continent by voting to exit the E.U. “Intended to counter migrants and terrorist attacks, these moves are not limited to Europe. In the Middle …

2017-02-16T13:02:33+00:00

Exclusive: The photography roots of Bonobo’s Kerala, from director Bison

A new music video from Bonobo features a terrified Gemma Arterton stumbling around a London suburb as a sequence of supernatural visions appear before her. In an exclusive interview, BJP sat down with the director, Bison, to discuss a promo that utilises a variety of glitchy video loops to devastating effect.

2016-11-24T16:28:53+00:00

POSTmatter relaunches, finding meaning amidst chaos in the digital age

How do you find meaning amidst chaos? Mythologies have always given shape to the world around us, weaving stories to make sense of natural forces, potential futures and other mysterious phenomena. The parallel between the myths and rites of the past, and the alternative belief systems of today’s postdigital age, are explored in POSTmatter’s newly relaunched online format, which will see the digital platform publish two issues per year, developing custom interactive and moving image pieces that put a new spin on the traditional. Separate to each issue, the magazine will also publish original written and visual pieces on varied topics throughout the year. With a primary focus on contemporary art, POSTmatter is the trailblazing force setting out to challenge the outdated separation between online and print, looking at how emerging and established artists alike are being influenced by new technologies, and how they in turn are changing the ways in which we engage with these tools. “I began to wonder why it seemed to be the rule that a magazine’s print output was the …

2016-09-29T13:33:40+00:00

Image (c) Cristina De Middel

Friday 20 May: BJP joins Photo London to present an afternoon of film screenings

British Journal of Photography is screening a day of films today (Friday 20 May) at the Photo London art fair at Somerset House. One of  highlights of the programme is a free screening of James Crump’s acclaimed documentary, Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art (2015), just released in the UK. The 72-minute film tells the story of how, in the late 1960s, a cadre of emerging New York artists sought to transcend the limitations of art. They were looking for a larger canvas to work on. Troublemakers mines previously unseen photographs to resurrect the lives of artists who made earthworks, rather than artworks, and whose creations still exist – on a monumental scale – in the desolate deserts of the American southwest. “In doing so, they thought they were going to end galleries,” says director James Crump, whose film explores how, in making works that can never be possessed as an object in a gallery, such artists stood in direct contrast to the emerging, hyper-speculative contemporary art world of the day, and, evermore so, the …

2016-05-20T10:44:34+00:00

BJP Staff