All posts filed under: Landscape

10exposures-salgado-slide-0b43-jumbo

Sebastião Salgado’s Kuwait: A Desert on Fire Gets Limited Edition Release

In January and February 1991, as the United States–led coalition drove Iraqi forces out of Kuwait, Saddam Hussein’s troops retaliated with an inferno. As the desperate efforts to contain and extinguish the conflagration progressed, Sebastião Salgado traveled to Kuwait to witness the crisis firsthand.

2016-11-11T13:35:16+00:00

sophieiceland4

Sophie le Roux’s dreamlike Icelandic landscapes

When was the first time you became aware of photography? How old were you? One of my favourite books as a child was a photographic book on Iceland that I found on the street with my Mum. It contained so many wonderful film spreads of Iceland (mostly aerial shots, and a lot of sheep farming). I am deeply attached to the book and take it wherever I go. I always vowed to go to Iceland as soon as it was possible. I went, last month, and finally got to take pictures of my own. One day I would like to see it in a helicopter, if I keep down my carbon footprint for a bit. How did you learn to become a photographer? I was taught how to use a darkroom by a few people at various stages during my childhood. I have barely any technical knowledge yet. I’m working on that. I started off working with an SLR, so learned the basics, but then went to digital for several years before returning to film. …

2016-11-21T19:25:08+00:00

From the series Coleman's Cafe

William Christenberry’s evocation of the American South in new New York exhibition

During pilgrimages to his native Hale County, Alabama, William Christenberry has recorded the changing appearance of the region’s natural landscape and vernacular architecture in diverse formats and media since the early 1960s. The work is shown for the first time at New York’s Pace/MacGill Gallery, in an about to launch exhibition.

2016-10-31T16:47:55+00:00

03.tif

Photographing the folkloric mythologies of rural Romania

“I feel like time is slipping away, and I’ve always had a sense that time is moving too fast,” says photographer Laura Pannack as we sit down to discuss her latest body of work. “I just have this fear that I’m a grain of sand, that I am not making the most of the time I have here. It’s not just about this inner pressure to be productive, it’s about an appreciation of time.” Pannack’s anxieties over the passage of time are not unusual, but universal. In an era where technology allows us to be inundated with our peers’ every success, our perceptions of time and achievement have become warped, giving us somewhat damaging illusions over our own measures of accomplishment. The London-based photographer need not to worry – at least for now. Pannack has just received the coveted Getty Prestige Grant, awarding her $15,000 to realise the continuation of her project Youth Without Age, Life Without Death. For her latest undertaking, Pannack set about unravelling the myths, culture and tradition of the rural Romanian …

2016-10-21T19:30:10+00:00

BJP Staff