All posts filed under: Landscape

Michael Benson’s Atmospheres gets solo show at Flowers Gallery

For more than a decade, Benson has used raw image data from robotic interplanetary missions to create large-format landscape photographs of the planets, their moons and the Sun. An exhibition of new and recent planetary photographs by Benson, his first solo exhibition, is about to go on show at Flowers Gallery, London.

2016-10-10T14:56:25+00:00

Shadman Shahid – White Elephant

In the eighteenth century, the Kings of Siam found an ingenious way of excluding a courtier they didn’t like. They would present the offending socialite with a white elephant, a rare and unusual creature, one very difficult to make space for. No-one would dare decline a gift from the King. And so the recipient would be lumbered with something they could not maintain. They would invariably be ruined by the cost of trying to keep the white elephant, and would then be forced to take their leave of the Kings’ circles. Siam is now modern-day Thailand, but the idea of the white elephant has endured, entering our modern parlance. Shadman Shahid, a documentary photographer born and raised in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and a graduate of the city’s revered Pathshala South Asian Media Academy photography course, used the term to describe a remarkable discovery in China; a “ghost-city” called Chenggong, designed for more than a 100,000 people but standing silent, unpopulated, empty but for tiny pockets of life. “I was born and raised in a city where …

2016-10-10T11:59:41+00:00

Photographing The Vast New Tunnels Underneath London

It’s cost the taxpayer £15 billion, it stretches for 26 miles, and it has unearthed artefacts from eight thousand years of London’s history. The British photographer Simon Norfolk, on commission for National Geographic Magazine, went 40 meters beneath the streets of London to photograph Crossrail.

2016-10-04T12:59:16+00:00

Behind the shiny new structures of modern Baku, Azerbaijan

French photographer Mathias Depardon first visited Baku in 2012, shooting human rights issues at the Nagorno Karabkh border, and describes the place as “Orwellian”. “I was fascinated by the effect the government had made to polish the city and make it look fast and modern,” he says. “It seems like they are trying to attract the attention elsewhere to make their reputation more respectful on the international scene.” Once Soviet, Azerbaijan became independent after a bloody conflict with Soviet troops in 1990; a repressive government took control and, when the country found prosperity via a huge contract with a European oil consortium, the wealth was not even distributed. More than 40 percent of the population lives below the poverty line, and the global slump in oil prices is now poised to push living standards down still further. It’s also casting dark clouds over the ambitious infrastructure spending that has transformed the city scape, and which so struck Depardon. He’s visited Baku four times since 2012, taking a long-term approach to his project and fitting it …

2016-09-30T17:23:02+00:00

Liza Dracup’s Yorkshire Landmarks on show at Harrogate

Dracup was given access to the Mercer Art Gallery’s collection of Victorian photographs and invited to respond to them in her own way. Dracup mader her name in the photography community when she was nominated for both the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 and the Prix Pictet (Earth) Photography Award 2009. She selected mainly stereoscopic photographs taken within a 35 km radius around Harrogate, often by anonymous photographers. She was looking, she says, for “the feeling of the ordinary landscape’. Landmarks features Yorkshire locations like Hackfall Woods, The Strid Wood at Bolton Abbey, the railway bridge crossing the River Nidd at Knaresborough and Ilkley Moor. She often explores aspects of the landscape at different times of the day and night, where the shutter remains open long enough to capture parts of the spectrum that are normally invisible to the eye. It is, says Dracup, an “in-between light that reveals opposites: light and dark, day and night”. Dracup’s pictures of Ilkley Moor at night, where the warming-up sodium street light illuminates the underbranches of a fir …

2016-09-30T16:43:05+00:00

My Winter Holiday in Beijing

Cedric Van Turtlebloom’s contemporary documentary style centres around everyday life – but not as we know it. Currently editing his second photobook, in which he takes a quizzical look at China’s burgeoning middle class and its penchant for artificial ski slopes, his visual stories are anything but conventional.

2016-09-09T22:51:30+00:00

BJP Staff