All posts filed under: BJP

BJP #7841: The Portraiture Issue

The British Journal of Photography’s November 2015 issue, based around the theme of portraiture, is now available to download in the app store or to buy direct from us in the BJP shop. The issue features the enigmatic Swedish photographer JH Engström, who allowed BJP into his home in the Swedish heartlands for a week, for one of the most intimate insights into his process he’s ever revealed. We also talk to the celebrated Spanish photographer Cristina de Middel about her work at the Lagos Photography Festival – and how the Nigerian people are embracing photography wholeheartedly. We go behind the scenes of Burden of Proof, the new exhibition at Soho’s The Photographers’ Gallery, which looks at the relationship between photography and forensic science. Elsewhere in the issue, the influential photographer thinker and writer David Campany explores a very alternative history of photography. Diane Smyth, editor of this month’s issue, introduces the themes of the issue: “At first sight, JH Engström’s faded Utopian architecture, forensic photography, images of dust and the Lagos Photo Festival don’t have much in common, but this is …



WeTransfer announced as Media Partner for the IPA 2016


Valued by creatives across the globe for the speed and simplicity of its file transfer service, WeTransfer’s commitment to artistic vision is integrated into its design with full screen backdrops that function as both advertising space and a curated showcase of inspirational artwork. As official Media Partner of the IPA 2016, winners of the award will receive the additional prize of a four-week showcase on the WeTransfer homepage, reaching over 70 million users worldwide and providing an unmissable opportunity for exposure to the international creative community. Runners up in each category will receive WeTransfer Plus accounts, complete with long term storage, increased upload sizes and password protected transfers. For full details of this year’s International Photography Awards visit:


BJP #7840: The Fashion Issue

While Continental Europe is only just returning home from holidays, here in London, after a particularly damp August, we’re ready to brighten things up, turning on the style with a month of issues dedicated to fashion, available to order now, as well as a download from the App Store. We’re in good company. Later this month, the fashion cognoscenti will be heading to the British capital for London Fashion Week, where homegrown talents such as Gareth Pugh, JW Anderson and Vivienne Westwood share the runway with international designers, including Maison Margiela, Barbara Casasola and Versus. And London-based fashion magazines such as Pop, The Gentlewoman and Dazed & Confused have just put out their September editions, which are usually the most important of the year in terms of page numbers and ad spend. We’ll be celebrating British talent with a profile of photographer du jour, Jamie Hawkesworth, interviewed by Jason Evans, alongside a visit to the London home of someone who influenced him, Nigel Shafran. We will also be covering the emergence of agencies devoted to mature …


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Bruno Ceschel, Sean O’Hagan and more to judge the BJP International Photography Award


Would you like The Guardian’s photography critic Sean O’Hagan to see your work? Or Bruno Ceschel, founder of Self Publish, Be Happy? How about Kate Bush, Head of Photography at Media Space? Now you can, via the BJP International Photography Award. The competition is divided into a series and a single image category. The series category will be judged by Bruno Ceschel, director of Self Publish, Be Happy and SPBH Editions; Sean O’Hagan, photography critic for The Guardian and The Observer; Hannah Watson, director of TJ Boulting gallery and Trolley Books. The single image category will be judged by Emily Graham, Cultural and Education Manager at Magnum Photos; James Reid; director of photography at Wallpaper* Magazine; Ewen Spencer, award-winning photographer and film maker; and Hannah Watson of TJ Boulting. Both the series and the single image winner will have their work printed and framed by theprintspace, exhibited for two weeks at London’s TJ Boulting Gallery in 2016, and published across BJP’s print and digital channels. The BJP International Photography Award has been running since 2005. Previous winners …


Call for entries – BJP’s International Photography Awards 2016


British Journal of Photography’s annual International Photography Award is now open for entries, offering the winners the chance to show their work at TJ Boulting, an innovative gallery in the heart of Fitzrovia, central London. The winners will also have their work printed and framed by one of Europe’s leading professional photography labs, theprintspace. Now in its 10th year, the IPA has established itself as one of the photography world’s leading showcases for new work, with last year’s series winner, Dominic Hawgood, attracting rave reviews in The Guardian and Time Out. This year’s elite judging panel, drawn from the worlds of photography, art and media allow entrants to get their work in front of the most influential people in the industry. This year’s panel includes: Kate Bush, head of photography at Media Space within The Science Museum, London Sean O’Hagan, photography critic at The Guardian and The Observer Emily Graham, culture & education manager at Magnum Photos Bruno Ceschel, founder of Self Publish, Be Happy and photobook expert Hannah Watson, director of Trolley Books and TJ …


Every year workers in the largest public cemetery in Guatemala exhume the bodies of some 4,000 infants to deposit in a mass grave, which borders the main garbage dump in the capital city. Cemetery rules state that six years after a burial, relatives must pay 180 Quetzales, around US$24 dollars, to renew the burial plot for another four years. If there is no payment, cemetery workers exhume the bodies of the young children and put the skeleton in a mass grave. Almost none of the relatives pay the fees and over 4,000 bodies are exhumed annually.

The cemetery in Guatemala that exhumes babies’ graves

When a child dies, some parents quell their pain with the belief that their child is among the angels. Others find comfort in knowing their child is at rest. They know there is a place where, in moments of quiet despair, they can drop to their knees and grieve the absence of their little body to hold. So when photojournalist Saul Martinez learned that, in his home country of Guatemala, deceased children were being exhumed from their places of rest and being disposed of in a public burial pit, it struck him as inconceivable. “I set out to find this cemetery that I had heard about. It was somewhat difficult to get access to it; the workers didn’t really want to let me see much at first. “I was so shocked when I saw the remains of children being pulled out, not only because of the fact that babies were being exhumed but because a job like this actually exists.” And so began Forgotten Children, Guatemala City, a documentary short and series of images that …


BJP #7839: California Redux, BJP’s documentary issue, is available to buy now

San Francisco photographers from the 1980s. James Ellroy’s raid of the LAPD archives. An Iranian photographer,  a Magnum legend in the making. Each is featured, exclusively, in the new issue of British Journal of Photography, available to buy now. BJP September 2015 is a documentary issue dedicated to shining a light on the photographers forgotten by their generation, unrecognised by their native culture, but creating acerbic, politically-charged and revealing documentary photography works. We’ve featured these photographers for the fact that photographic canons, the pantheons of accepted greats, can feel pretty permanent while they last. But the celebrated photographer of today can easily be a historical footnote of tomorrow, and the obscure images lost in the archive one day can easily take centre stage the next. This, we think, is what’s happening to the three photographers profiled in this month’s cover image – Mimi Plumb, Janet Delaney and Michael Jang, all of whom hit their stride in California in the 1970s and 80s. Making acute documentary work with a historical or political bent, they never quite got the critical acclaim they deserved …


The angels of lot (Gli angeli di lot), 2008. From Sodom and Gomorrah © Alessandro Bavari

Alessandro Bavari – in the belly of the beast

There are many disparate moments in Alessandro Bavari’s childhood that inform the artist he is today – watching tadpoles hatch, the first time he walked into a Gothic church in Burgundy, losing grip of a balloon and seeing it bob away, meeting its fate against a rose bush. He says these impressions are so profound – a sensation, a feeling of wonder, a sound – they occasionally crop up in his work. Bavari uses mixed-media techniques to create a unique body of work that incorporates both photography and film. He often draws on literary influences, offering his own interpretation using model sets, organic objects, photography and digital manipulation. The results are often macabre, and sometimes irreverent. His ongoing series, Sodom and Gomorrah, is one such unique fusion of media. “Sodom and Gomorrah was first conceived 15 years ago. I was inspired by Invisible Cities, a novel by Italo Calvino, written and published in the 1970s, but which he cultivated over many years through travel notes and reflections, and organised by themes – the five senses, …


BJP #7838: Sound & Vision

The latest issue of the oldest photography magazine in the world, available to buy now, has been put together to coincide with the opening of the contemporary music photography show We Want More at The Photographer’s Gallery, curated by BJP Deputy Editor Diane Smyth, from the 17 July to 20 September 2015. It includes features on Sven Marquardt, a long-term bouncer from underground Berlin, capturing decades of nefarious activity in a global capital of live music. We speak to Sanna Charles about her book God Listens to Slayer, the culmination of ten years spent photographing the metal band’s most dedicated cult fans. And we feature Michele Sibiloni, who realises a new vision of Ugandan society by embedding himself in the vibrant cultural nightlife of Kampala, the nation’s capital. Here, Diane Smyth, editor of this month’s BJP, introduces the issue: “Photography, like literature, has many genres. And as with literature, some of those genres have more stature than others. Where literary fiction has more cachet than detective novels, documentary has higher status than music photography – which is all too often …


From 1800 Millimètre © Emi Anrakuji

Emi Anrakuji – ‘1800 millimetres. It’s the size of my bed’

The elusive Emi Anrakuji. Her work seems to have exploded onto the photography scene in early 2000, attracting the attention of Daido Moriyama in 2004. “He was very much impressed,” says Emi, whose body of work is a series of self-portraits in which she often focuses on the most intimate details of her anatomy while simultaneously concealing her identity. It’s this contradiction that obfuscates the viewer. Legs splayed, crouched on a bed on all fours, a finger inserted into her vagina – the self-portraits in 1800 Millimètre, Emi’s latest body of work, “are not erotic at all,” she says. “1800 millimetres is just the size of my bed.” A bed to which she was confined, which came to represent her world – the very world from where her work originated. “It’s work that came out of my sickbed.” In 1800 Millimètre, Anrakuji poses nude, in solitude, in close shadowy settings – the confines of her bedroom staged for the gaze of a lens. She describes herself as “an alchemist of images”, blurring the contrived and the authentic …


BJP Staff