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BJP & Magnum Photos present four new Professional Practice Workshops


With an ever-changing arts market and increasingly competitive photography network, there has never been a time more important to know how to market, sell and distribute your work. A fresh programme of workshops led by industry professionals and Magnum photographers taking place over the coming months, will provide an invaluable insight into the dos and don’ts of the photography market, and present highly valuable training opportunities for photographers at any stage in their career. There will be four workshops each lasting two days, with the first starting on 19 November. Each will address a different aspect of the business, including how to establish a professional network of industry contacts, how to understand the requirements of the market and what the realistic routes into photographic employment are. A selection of carefully curated lectures from speakers addressing specific areas of the photographic industry, sharing practical advice on how to succeed in their particular area,  will take the lead in activities for the first day. On the second day, photographers will have the chance to present their portfolios and get honest …



BJP’s The Community Issue is available to pre-order

This issue is all about photographing community, featuring work captured over decades, from Peter Mitchell’s Planet Yorkshire to Chris Dorley-Brown’s East End archive, as well as CJ Clarke’s project on his Essex home town and Victoria Hely-Hutchinson’s account of life in Britain’s elite public schools. We also present two very different communities photographed by Klaus Pichler, focused on hard-core drinkers and New Agers – a community of people obsessed with esotericism. In Projects, we have two contrasting takes on the political process in the lead up to the US elections. In Intelligence, we talk to Ali Taptik about the challenges of capturing an unfamiliar city, as the recipient of the first Elliott Erwitt Havana 7 Fellowship, and we tell the story of how a simple act of humanity turned into a wide-ranging portrait project that got backing from UNHCR. Plus, we have interviews with French curator Clément Chéroux, XL Recordings’ creative director Phil Lee, a preview of Paris Photo and reviews of the Pentax K-1 and a remarkable 12mm superwide. Editor Simon Bainbridge writes: “There’s no hurrying Peter …



Be Part of Portrait of Britain

The exhibition is also available in a limited-edition print sale. So, in this most public of art exhibitions, if you like something you see, you can buy a part of it for yourself. The BJP team envisaged an exhibition by the people, of the people and for the people. In our new portraiture issue, on shelves now, we reveal the selected images which, for the month of September, will be seen up and down the country. “The exhibition is about celebrating the diversity and the unique heritage of Britain and hopefully by doing so adding some nuance to the very divisive debate following Brexit,” BJP‘s editorial director Simon Bainbridge tells TIME. “The portraits say we aren’t easily categorized by class or race or age or region,” says Bainbridge. “Once you are confronted with a person, you have to engage with them as an individual and not as stereotype or a grouping. That’s something photography does very easily, it disrupts your prejudice or your usual thoughts about people outside your own bubble.” We’ve now launched a …


BJP editor talks Portrait of Britain on BBC London


Bainbridge appeared on BBC Radio London to talk about the 100 selected portraits for the nationwide public exhibition Portrait of Britain,  showcased on JCDecaux digital screens across the UK now. He was joined by photographers to discuss the significance of their portrait shots within the context of modern Britain. Visible on the nation’s high streets, roadsides and in transport hubs across the length and breadth of the country throughout September 2016, the exhibition will be seen by an audience of millions. “When public art works really well it has an engagement with its surroundings and local population. That’s what we want to do with Portrait of Britain. “If you genuinely want your work to be seen by the public and not just a bunch of gallerists and publishers in a metropolitan city, this is a unique opportunity to get it out to an extraordinary amount of people,” said Bainbridge, Editor of British Journal of Photography. Listen to the interview here:


From My Winter Holiday in Beijing © Cedric Van Turtlebloom

My Winter Holiday in Beijing

Cedric Van Turtlebloom’s contemporary documentary style centres around everyday life – but not as we know it. Currently editing his second photobook, in which he takes a quizzical look at China’s burgeoning middle class and its penchant for artificial ski slopes, his visual stories are anything but conventional.



BJP’s Portrait Issue 2016, with Portrait of Britain

The magazine also includes longform features on Nadav Kander’s most recent portraiture series, Charlie Kwai’s stunning London street photography, and the picture editors of some of the world’s top magazines. After settling in Kentish Town, North London, Kander established himself as on the most in-demand commercial portrait photographers in the world – taking iconic pictures of people like Barack Obama and Desmond Tutu, David Beckham and David Lynch. In 2009, Kander started to work on more conceptual, landscape-orientated series. His series Yangtze, the Long River won the prestigious Prix Pictet, while his series Dust, which documents sites of Soviet nuclear testing on the border between Kazakhstan and Russia, and Bodies, a series of nudes covered in marble white dust, were exhibited at London’s Flowers Gallery. Daily Presentations is his latest series, a mediation on modern Britain, through a series of serendipitous portraits of strangers. Charlie Kwai is a self-described shy man, who began his life as a photographer by taking landscapes. That changed when the London-based artist started to walk the streets of his hometown, …



Own Part of Portrait of Britain, the UK’s Biggest Public Art Exhibition

The BJP team envisaged an exhibition by the people, of the people and for the people. Now, in our new portraiture issue, we reveal the selected images which, for the month of September, will be displayed nationwide on JCDecaux digital screens in an unprecedented outdoor exhibition examining the face of modern Britain. Of nearly 4000 entries, we have selected the portraits that capture the young and the old, reflecting not just the multiformity of British people, but also the myriad of styles and approaches to contemporary photographic portraiture. Simon Bainbridge, editor of BJP, says of the exhibition: “We hope that, collectively, the 100 selected portraits would present an alternative to the mainstream rhetoric, and that, taken on their own, they would add some nuance to the picture of who we are as a country, and celebrate our unique heritage and diversity.” We’ve now launched a limited edition, museum quality print sale for almost all of the Portrait of Britain images. Many of the photographs are available to buy, priced from £75 for an A4 print …


Rail_St Pancras_PhilSharp

BJP’s Portrait of Britain exhibition to launch across the UK on 1st September

We asked you to show us the modern face of Britain. And while much has happened in the six months since that might challenge our long-held notions about our national identity, the 100 portraits chosen provide a reflection on who we really are, away from the rhetoric of politics and the discourse of division. Envisaged as an exhibition by the people, of the people and for the people, Portrait of Britain was initiated as an open call for photographs that celebrate this country’s unique heritage and diversity. Selected from nearly 4000 entries, the winning portraits capture young and old, reflecting not just the multiformity of British people, but also the myriad of styles and approaches to contemporary photographic portraiture. There is formality and craft in photographs such as Phil Sharp’s profile view of musicians and producer Dave Okumu, which features on our cover. Others are more casual, a moment observed and captured, like Celia Topping’s photograph of her son meeting his newborn brother for the first time. There are portraits that directly refer to the many nuances …


From the series Mimasu © Karim Skalli

Mimasu: a visual diary of observations

Karim Skalli understood as a child, when visiting his family in Casablanca, that light is not merely a source of illumination – it’s sensorial, evoking a mood or a feeling when it beams through crevices in curtains and on to objects in the home. One of six children, his mother and father would pile them all into a big red van and travel across continents – through England, France and Spain – to reach Casablanca, the birthplace of his father. “We couldn’t afford to fly because there were just too many of us, so my father would drive: it would take days. There wasn’t much to do on those trips, so I used to stare out the window, looking at all the different landscapes, the different cities, the different people. I was captivated by the soft tones the sun cast as it set. Those trips were my window into the world beyond – almost literally,” says Skalli. Light shapes our relationship with both interior and exterior spaces; for example, it plays a significant role in …


BJP Staff