All posts filed under: BJP

From the series Mimasu © Karim Skalli

Mimasu: a visual diary of observations

Karim Skalli understood as a child, when visiting his family in Casablanca, that light is not merely a source of illumination – it’s sensorial, evoking a mood or a feeling when it beams through crevices in curtains and on to objects in the home. One of six children, his mother and father would pile them all into a big red van and travel across continents – through England, France and Spain – to reach Casablanca, the birthplace of his father. “We couldn’t afford to fly because there were just too many of us, so my father would drive: it would take days. There wasn’t much to do on those trips, so I used to stare out the window, looking at all the different landscapes, the different cities, the different people. I was captivated by the soft tones the sun cast as it set. Those trips were my window into the world beyond – almost literally,” says Skalli. Light shapes our relationship with both interior and exterior spaces; for example, it plays a significant role in …

2016-08-09T15:10:25+00:00

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Editor’s Introduction: The Migration Issue (BJP #7851)

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This issue of BJP focuses on the European migrant crisis which, over the last couple of years, has seen a surge of people entering the continent. Many are refugees fleeing conflict, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees stating that in 2015 49% of those arriving from the Mediterranean came from Syria, 21% came from Afghanistan, and 8% from Iraq. Even so, attitudes in Europe have hardened, and photography has played a sometimes dubious role in fostering that colder climate. Upon Googling ‘refugee children’, Patrick Willocq found hundreds of pictures that looked the same, he tells BJP – “people on beaches, children crying, very little humanity.” His response, created for Save the Children, was to collaborate with young refugees and reflect their mental state instead, and the same sense of humanity runs through the other projects we’ve featured. “It’s no longer about making people aware of the migrants’ movements. They know,” says Alessandro Penso. “It’s now something else, something more personal, something about empathy.” In taking this approach, these photographers open themselves up to …

2016-08-04T10:53:58+00:00

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BJP Breakthrough 2016: Presenting the Single Image runners-up

SAM IVIN What does it mean to be an asylum seeker in the UK? The question first struck Sam Ivin in 2013, after seeing news reports of a high volume of asylum applications and a UK border agency struggling to get a handle on the situation. A Documentary Photography student at University of South Wales, Newport at the time, he decided to visit drop-in centres and actually get up-close with the human beings behind the headlines. The resulting series, Lingering Ghosts, published by Fabrica earlier this year, gives a visceral insight into the inner lives of the dispossessed. The series has recently been exhibited at Athens Photo Festival, will be shown at Rome’s Galleria del Cembalo in September and features in our next issue of BJP, which focuses on photographic responses to migration. Ivin would listen to their stories, take their portrait and then radically intervene in the image – defacing the photograph with a Stanley knife and sandpaper, evoking their sense of loss, confusion and dislocation. His portrait [above], taken in a South London drop-in centre for …

2016-07-21T11:50:07+00:00

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#BJP 7850: The Education Issue

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“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it …

2016-08-04T10:54:28+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Adama Jalloh

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. Entries close this Saturday – submit your work soon! We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Adama Jalloh.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? It’s a mixture of things – from the subject’s expression or mannerisms, the tones, the space, how the light might hit the subject. Its always interesting looking back at the results of an image, whether you’ve had 10 seconds of interaction with someone or spent a longer period of time with them. From time to time you get a sense of nervousness from strangers when you ask for their portrait, so being able to capture an unexpected emotion during brief encounters can be interesting. What attracts you to a potential subject? It could be based on the way they are …

2016-07-05T14:04:14+00:00

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#BJP 7849: Modern Myths

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If photography is indexically tied to the present moment, the past presents something of a challenge. Yet the features gathered here this month all draw on ancient customs and legends – from The Ramayana and The Bible to Greek mythology and traditional festivals held in Valencia and the Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico. What these projects record isn’t the past but the way that that the past lives on; old narratives that continue to inform lives that are also shaped by technology that would once have seemed like science fiction. And these series also show how photographers and their subjects can subvert and evolve these ancient stories, whether by using traditional carnival characters to question modern gender roles in Central America, or Classical statues to consider Western depictions of female nudes. If everything in the present day has evolved from something that went before, photographers can tunnel back through time by carefully selecting what they look at. How does our front cover fit in? Taken from Leslie Moquin’s project Shanghai Cosmetic, it seems to …

2016-07-05T13:36:20+00:00

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Your chance to invest in British Journal of Photography

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A note from BJP… Some of you might have seen a few messages on our social media, or received a note from us about crowdfunding and the future of BJP. Don’t worry – it’s good news. We’re very excited to announce that British Journal of Photography are looking to raise at least £150,000 through equity crowdfunding. We’ve grown from a weekly trade journal to an international brand respected across the industry, encompassing magazines, events, digital initiatives and collaborative partnerships. We have ambitious plans for the future and want to better serve our global readership and with additional investment, we’re confident we’ll be able to do so. Crowdfunding has become mainstream recent years, and it’s the perfect way for us to allow our readers to participate in our growth. But this isn’t your average crowdfunding proposal – if you invest in BJP (starting from just £10), you’ll own a piece of the one of the oldest photographic institutions. The global appetite for photography has grown massively in recent years and we’ve grown with it, turning our …

2016-06-08T10:56:23+00:00

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The Talent Issue: Ones to Watch 2016

BJP

Our latest issue, Ones to Watch, is available to buy now from The BJP Shop. Find it in the App Store from 3 May and in shops from 4 May. Since 2011, we’ve dedicated an issue of BJP to identifying the best emerging talent in the photographic world – the image-makers poised for international success and set to loom large in the industry for years to come. In our annual Talent Issues, we’ve featured over 100 photographers who have gone on to firmly establish themselves in their respective fields, shining a spotlight on the work of photographers such as Diana Markosian, Max Pinckers and Mariela Sancari. This year, we’ve asked a global panel of 60 experts – including Martin Parr, Erik Kessels, Bruno Ceschel, Elizabeth Avedon and more – to nominate sixteen photographers they think represent the future of photography. The panel – made up of editors, curators, educators, gallery owners, festival directors, writers and photographers – have all weighed in and represent the full spectrum of the photographic community. We present the photographers set to make noise in …

2016-06-08T10:57:10+00:00

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