All posts filed under: New Talent

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Sophie le Roux’s dreamlike Icelandic landscapes

When was the first time you became aware of photography? How old were you? One of my favourite books as a child was a photographic book on Iceland that I found on the street with my Mum. It contained so many wonderful film spreads of Iceland (mostly aerial shots, and a lot of sheep farming). I am deeply attached to the book and take it wherever I go. I always vowed to go to Iceland as soon as it was possible. I went, last month, and finally got to take pictures of my own. One day I would like to see it in a helicopter, if I keep down my carbon footprint for a bit. How did you learn to become a photographer? I was taught how to use a darkroom by a few people at various stages during my childhood. I have barely any technical knowledge yet. I’m working on that. I started off working with an SLR, so learned the basics, but then went to digital for several years before returning to film. …

2016-11-21T19:25:08+00:00

From My Winter Holiday in Beijing © Cedric Van Turtlebloom

My Winter Holiday in Beijing

Cedric Van Turtlebloom’s contemporary documentary style centres around everyday life – but not as we know it. Currently editing his second photobook, in which he takes a quizzical look at China’s burgeoning middle class and its penchant for artificial ski slopes, his visual stories are anything but conventional.

2016-09-09T22:51:30+00:00

From the series Mimasu © Karim Skalli

Mimasu: a visual diary of observations

Karim Skalli understood as a child, when visiting his family in Casablanca, that light is not merely a source of illumination – it’s sensorial, evoking a mood or a feeling when it beams through crevices in curtains and on to objects in the home. One of six children, his mother and father would pile them all into a big red van and travel across continents – through England, France and Spain – to reach Casablanca, the birthplace of his father. “We couldn’t afford to fly because there were just too many of us, so my father would drive: it would take days. There wasn’t much to do on those trips, so I used to stare out the window, looking at all the different landscapes, the different cities, the different people. I was captivated by the soft tones the sun cast as it set. Those trips were my window into the world beyond – almost literally,” says Skalli. Light shapes our relationship with both interior and exterior spaces; for example, it plays a significant role in …

2016-08-09T15:10:25+00:00

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By the water: Photographing the mysterious power of the Dead Sea

There’s something Biblical about the Dead Sea. Quite literally – passages and passages of scripture references and prophesies about the salty lake in which no living thing can flourish or grow. The Greeks and Romans noted the mysterious power of the water, which, bordered by Israel, Palestine and Jordan, has played host to history throughout the centuries. Today, stories of myths and legends have quieted to whispers, and its expensive, mineral-rich mud is sold to tourists eager to procure some semblance of the lake’s reviving properties. But in recent years the Dead Sea has come under threat, thanks to declining sea levels and the recent appearance of sinkholes. The Dead Sea’s siren-like call attracted Danish photographer Kasper Palsnov, whose series Salt depicts the reality of a region between states; history and modernity, fertile and barren. His interest in the region came from a study trip to Israel and Palestine in 2013, travelling with interns at the Danish daily newspaper Berlingske. “From the first second we arrived I was fascinated by the place. It was a place of beauty and …

2016-07-13T17:51:07+00:00

Woman I (Cards), 2014. From the series FLAT DEATH © Sara Cwynar. Courtesy Cooper Cole Gallery, Toronto.

FOAM Talent launches in London

It is not often that you meander around a gallery space and can barely get past the hoards of students, professionals and new talents of photography as they press together to see the photography on display. Such was the bustling opening night of the eclectic FOAM Talent, a group show of 21 up-and-coming photographers under the age of 35, at the Beaconsfield Gallery in London. The photography on display here has already been featured in a dedicated issue of the FOAM magazine, and is now exhibited in over two large rooms in a dynamically curated showcase of more than 100 photographs. “The range of different work is important,” says curator, Mirjam Kooiman. “What ties them together is that they’re young and that they have a strong, autonomous vision, whether it’s through studio or documentary photography.” This year, there is a noticeable emphasis on the physical presentation of the images, adding a new sculptural aspect to the exhibition. Jean-Vincent Simonet, a French photographer, invites us into a psychedelic world of vivid colour marbled with metallic shine. For each display of …

2016-04-26T12:01:37+00:00

BJP Staff