All posts filed under: News

From the series Playground © Julien Lombardi

Images hit the streets in JaipurPhoto festival

The term ‘travel photography’ may call to mind generic holiday snaps, but a festival in Jaipur is raising the bar for a more probing approach. Founded by the team behind GoaPhoto, artistic director Lola Mac Dougall and filmmaker and producer Nikhil Padgaonkar, JaipurPhoto returns to from 24 February to 05 March, following a successful inaugural edition in 2016, to explore what wanderlust can tell us about our times. Describing the relationship between travel and photography as an “endless conversation”, the festival spotlights the many ways photography has shaped how we experience the world. London-based curator and founder of The Photocaptionist, Federica Chiocchetti, this year’s guest curator, pinpoints the relevance of this conversation in our image-saturated culture as a starting point for putting together the 2017 edition. “I am fascinated by how the evolution of society and of photography has impacted on the very notion of travelling,” Chiocchetti says. From the pre-internet days of the travel agent selling a place through promotional images to the more recent way we filter our travel experiences through multiple devices, she notes that our experience …

2017-02-22T15:25:29+00:00

Tooting, London, 1975. From the series Family Units © Edward Barber

Obituary: Edward Barber 1949-2017

It’s a terrible shock and great sadness to be writing about Ed in the past tense. He was a great friend of mine for nearly 40 years, a man who believed passionately in the power of photography to show how people live, how they protest against the powerful and how people create things that counteract the corporate machine. We worked together on many projects for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) and at the Half Moon Gallery and its magazine Camerawork. Ed was one of the original members of the collective at the Half Moon in Alie Street, Whitechapel, with fellow photographers Jenny Matthews, Mike Goldwater and Paul Trevor. This was to prove to be incredibly dynamic and brilliant group who curated numerous influential photographic exhibitions, many of which were by photographers who have continued to produce important work, as they have themselves. Ed had the idea of laminating the exhibitions, at first because the roof leaked in Alie Street and plastic lamination made them waterproof. He began touring the laminated exhibitions, sending them by …

2017-02-21T17:09:29+00:00

Out of the Way © Elena Anosova, which won second prize in the Daily Life - Stories categories at the 2017 World Press Photo. World Press managing director Lars Boering says the paucity of women in photojournalism is one of the key issues he wants to debate at the organisation's many new initiatives this year

World Press Photo’s Lars Boering and the fight against “fake news”

Lars Boering, managing director of World Press Photo, joined the organisation in January 2015, just before that year’s prize was announced. It was an award beset with issues, as it emerged that more than 20% of the final-round entries had been disqualified for image-manipulation; then one of the winners – Giovanni Troilo, who had won first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Story category – was disqualified, when World Press found that an image he said had been shot in Charleroi, Brussels had been taken in Molenbeek. Boering countered with a new code of ethics for entrants, which meant that images submitted to the 2016 prize were more thoroughly checked – and were found to be less prone to manipulation. This year the issue with manipulation was at about the same level as in the 2016, he says, which leaves him to conclude that “it is still a very big media challenge”. “It’s not about World Press Photo, it’s industry-wide and we need to debate it,” he tells BJP. “It is something we feel very strongly about – there …

2017-02-13T17:31:06+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image © AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici. World Press Photo of the Year, from a series which won first place in the Spot News - Stories category

Burhan Ozbilici wins the World Press Photo of the Year

Burhan Ozbilici wasn’t even working when he shot his World Press Photo-winning image – he was catching up with a friend, in an art gallery 150m from his home in Ankara. But, as the exhibition was a series of images of Russia, and the Russian ambassador Andrei Karlov was giving a speech, the Associated Press photographer “decided to do my job” and took his camera along. Standing “two or three rows back” with the other members of the press, he started to record the unremarkable moment – then found himself at a murder scene, as gunman Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş shot the ambassador dead, then stopped to proclaim “revenge for Syria and Aleppo” over his body. “I immediately understood it was a very important incident,” says Ozbilici. “Everyone ran away and threw themselves on the ground, or behind walls, or under tables, shouting and panicking. I thought running away was not a solution anyway, and decided to remain calm to risk antagonising the gunman further. I just kept shooting, changing my position to get a better angle, trying to capture this …

2017-02-13T13:02:56+00:00

A small rubber dinghy filled with refugees and migrants arrives on the coast of Greek island Lesbos on 30 October 2015. The island of Lesbos has seen hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees arrive from Turkey in 2015. This shot is from a series called Europe's New Borders by Rasmus Degnbol, which won him first prize in the PHmuseum grant last year. Image © Rasmus Degnbol

A solo show, cash, and more up for grabs in the PHmuseum Grant

The deadline is approaching fast to enter the PHmuseum grant competition, which offers a total prize fund of £12,000, a solo show at the Cortona On The Move festival, a feature in the World Press Photo Foundation’s online publication Witness, and more. Photographers have until 15 February to enter their work. Arranged by the Photographic Museum of Humanity, a curated online platform, the competition has nine big-name judges this year. The main award – which offers £7000, £3000, and £1000 to the first, second and third prize-winners respectively plus various promotion in Witness, Just Another Photo Festival and the PHmuseum – will be assigned by Emma Bowkett, director of photography at the FT Weekend Magazine; Sarah Leen, director of photography at National Geographic Magazine and Partners; Ihiro Hayami, director of the Tokyo Institute of Photography; and Alejandro Chaskielberg, the award-winning Argentinian photographer. The New Generation Prize – which offers a £1000 cash prize plus mentorship from photographer and photo director Maggie Steber, and promotion via Witness, Just Another Photo Festival and PHmuseum – will be …

2017-02-02T12:20:49+00:00

Epson's new printer, the SureColor SC-P5000

Epson launches the SureColor SC-P5000 printer

Tech giant Epson has launched its new professional photography, fine art and proofing printer, the SureColor SC-P5000 (17-inch). Slightly smaller than its predecessor, the Stylus Pro 4900, it features the advanced Epson PrecisionCore TFP printhead for precision and increased colour gamut, and completes the SureColor range (which also includes the high-quality, high-resolution SC-P7000 (24-inch) and SC-P9000 (44-inch) models). Seiko Epson, the mother company that began life as a small watch-making factory 75 years ago, has a long history of printing innovation, and has produced 30 new models in the SureColor printer range in just two years. It plans to add a further 15 in the next 18 months. Its focus today is sustainability, said Epson sales manager Phil McMullin, who emphasised the company’s mission to replace energy-hungry laser printers with inkjets. Of the SureColor SC-P5000 he said: “Colours are so precise that you can print in complete confidence, knowing the exact colour you want will be perfectly reproduced in the finished print.”The new printer is able to support two different ink combinations, including one with …

2017-01-26T16:48:44+00:00

Shimen Temple, from the series Hard Work © Ameena Rojee

Miniclick Soapbox comes to London

BJP‘s Ameena Rojee is one of six photographers presenting and discussing work at the Miniclick Soapbox event in London this Thursday. The University of West England graduate, who is also BJP‘s commercial campaign manager, will show the series Hard Work, shot at the School of Shaolin Kung Fu in Qufu, China. Rojee was originally inspired to visit the academy by the martial arts films she watched while growing up, but says the reality was very different. “The pollution was awful, greying the landscape almost daily, and I had a bad cough and no voice by the end of my month there,” she told BJP back in 2015. “I had quite romantic notions about the area when I was planning to go to; being out in what was quite a rural area, I was expecting lush greens and beautiful sunsets, rich colours and airs clearer than London. I found very much the opposite to what I’d expected, ideals built from a lifetime of watching visually gorgeous martial arts films.” Rojee will be showing her work alongside Joshua Parker, Maria Kapajeva, …

2017-01-23T15:27:20+00:00

Fujifilm GFX 50S with GF 63mm lens f/2.8

Introducing the Fujifilm GFX 50S

Fujifilm’s ‘development announcement’ of a compact medium format camera using mirrorless technology was one of the major talking points at last year’s Photokina trade show. Not that there was any real doubt it going into full production, confirmation of which came today, with the promise that it will be in UK stores by late February. The GFX 50S uses a customised version of the 43.8×32.9mm Sony 51.4-megapixel sensor seen elsewhere, making the most of its 3.69m-dot electronic display to offer a vari-angle viewfinder that flips and rotates for all-round viewing. The body is very much like the X Series, and is able to use a similar short flange-back design for improved lens-to-sensor transmission. It weighs 1230g when paired with a standard lens (GF 63mm f/2.8 R WR), which Fuji claims is nearly a third less than current MF cameras with a similar size sensor, and more comparable to a 35mm format DSLR. We were told last September that the price was going to make headlines; Damien Demolder guessing that it would be “significantly less than …

2017-01-24T11:33:17+00:00

BJP Staff