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From the series How to Secure a Country © Salvatore Vitale, which won first prize and £7000 in the Photographic Museum of Humanity 2017 Grant

Awards: Salvatore Vitale wins the PHM 2017 Grant

“Salvatore Vitale’s extraordinary project How to secure a country is a forensic examination of national security in one of the safest countries on the planet. This work challenges the concept of power and control, shining a light on wider issues of mass migration and fear,” says Emma Bowkett, director of photography for the FT Weekend Magazine and a jury member for the PH Museum 2017 Grant this year. Along with Sarah Leen from National Geographic, Ihiro Hayami from Tokyo Photography Festival, and the photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg, she picked out the Italian photographer for the top prize, for his project exploring the National Security Program in Switzerland, his adopted home. Two years in the making, the series has been funded by a Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia grant, and Vitale has scooped £7000 by winning the PH Museum prize. “Salvatore Vitale has managed to gain access to one of the most difficult places to photograph; border control,” comments Hayami. “He tries to capture, or examine, the abstract concept of security through the fragments of scenes and successfully presents, …

2017-04-27T15:01:55+00:00

Tokyo compression 18
, 2010. From the series Tokyo Compression © Michael Wolf, courtesy Prix Pictet

On show: Prix Pictet ‘Space’ at the V&A

Founded nine years ago by Swiss private bank the Pictet Group and Candlestar – the company behind Photo London, which opens a fortnight later – the prize draws attention to environmental issues but also reflects the strategies and approaches used by photographers to tackle socio-political concerns. The first edition, in 2008, was themed Water and was awarded to Canadian photographer Benoit Aquin for his photo essay The Chinese Dust Bowl, while Munem Wasif was commissioned to shoot a story on water shortages in his homeland, Bangladesh. Over subsequent years more conceptual approaches have been shortlisted in response to changing themes, which have included Power, Consumption and Disorder, won by Lucas Delahaye, Michael Schmidt and Valérie Belin respectively. “The intention was never to just feature photojournalism, much as we all love it,” says Michael Benson of Candlestar. “It was about opening up to all genres of photography.” This year’s Prix Pictet comes through on that promise, with a shortlist that includes a wide variety of work. Sergey Ponomarev’s series Europe Migration Crisis is classic photojournalism, for …

2017-04-26T12:49:09+00:00

Image © Toiletpaper

Photofestivals: Kyotographie opens in Japan

Japanese photographers are well-known in the West – if they’re from the 1960s Provoke movement. Contemporary photographers have won much less publicity but, the home of some of the world’s most advanced camera and printing technology, Japan has fostered a wealth of new talent in recent years, including BJP cover star Daisuke Yokota. The city of Kyoto has evolved into a new creative hub in Japan over the last decade, bringing with it events such as the international photography festival Kyotographie, co-directed and co-founded by husband and wife team Yusuke Nakanishi, a lighting director, and photographer Lucille Reyboz. It’s just opened for its fifth edition, which is themed Love and features 16 exhibitions in 16 carefully-selected venues, bridging the gap between Japanese and Western photography networks, and also championing new talent. For those who can’t visit, here are BJP‘s highlights. Toiletpaper at the Asphodel Catapulting you into a world of crimson furry carpets, disco ball lighting and bath soap sofas, Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari have transformed the three-storey Asphodel building into an outlandish universe of …

2017-04-25T16:42:21+00:00

The Haystack, 1844, from The Pencil of Nature by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-77). Salted paper print © The RPS Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The V&A announces a new Photography Centre in London

Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new centre will open in Autumn 2018 and more than double the V&A’s current photography exhibition space. The opening will be accompanied by a museum-wide photography festival, a new digital resource, and a new history of photography course run with the Royal College of Art. The V&A plans to run events and activities in the new centre, and will continue to expand the facility. Phase Two will see the museum add more gallery space, and create a teaching and research facility, a browsing library, and a studio and darkroom which will enable photographers’ residencies. The new centre comes as the V&A transfers the Royal Photographic Society’s collection from the Science Museum Group, which was formerly held in the National Media Museum in Bradford. The transfer adds over 270,000 photographs, 26,000 publications, and 6000 pieces of equipment to the V&A’s holdings – which was already one of the largest and most important in the world, including around 500,000 works collected since the foundation of the museum in 1852. The RPS collection includes …

2017-04-06T16:45:30+00:00

BJP's new office © BJP

BJP moves to a creative new hub in London’s East India Dock

BJP

Established in 1854, BJP is the world’s longest-running photography magazine, with a longevity built on innovation. We showcase the most important pioneers of photography, but we also keep on top of new trends ourselves, sometimes literally moving with the times to stay at the centre of Britain’s creative scene. Founded in Liverpool, the magazine moved to Covent Garden in 1864; in 2007 we moved to Soho, long at the heart of London’s media industry. In 2013 we settled in Shoreditch, an area then synonymous with art and creative businesses; but the area is changing fast so we’ve now moved again – to the up-and-coming East India Dock. “We are excited to be one of the first creative young businesses to be making the move to East India Dock, at the start of its transformation into a creative London hub,” says Marc Hartog, CEO of BJP‘s publisher Apptitude Media. “This is an exciting new chapter for BJP in the digital and social era and it is important to be in an environment which the team will enjoy and in which the …

2017-04-04T14:22:36+00:00

Joel Meyerowitz
Couple au manteau camel sur Street Steam, New York, 1975. Avec líaimable autorisation de líartiste et de la Howard Greenberg Gallery

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Joel Meyerowitz
Camel Coat Couple in Street Steam, New York City, 1975. Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Festivals: what’s on at Arles 2017

It’s the biggest, most prestigious photography festival in the world and it’s back – Les Rencontres de la Photographie in Arles opens on 03 July and closes on 24 September. It’s the 48th edition of the festival, which has seen seismic changes in the last few years – the departure of its long-standing director Francois Hebel after the 2014 edition, and the arrival of his replacement, Sam Stourdze, the backing of the influential LUMA Foundation, and the Cosmos-Arles book fair. This history and reputation mean Arles is able to pull in the big names, which this year means including solo shows by Joel Meyerowitz, Michael Wolf, Gideon Mendel, Masahisa Fukase, Alex Majoli and Roger Ballen; plus an exhibition on Surrealism organised by Le Centre Pompidou and including works by Hans Bellmer, Erwin Wurm and Rene Magritte. Arles also uses its might to showcase lesser-known names and regions, however, and one of the themes running through the 2017 edition is Latina!, a celebration of work from South America in four separate shows. Urban Impulses is a group …

2017-04-04T11:35:47+00:00

From the series The Canary and the Hammer © Lisa Barnard

Festival review: what’s hot at Format

In August of 2016, at the International Geological Congress in Cape Town, one of the world’s leading scientists declared we were living at the dawn of a new geological epoch – the human-influenced age. This new era, termed Anthropocene, replaces the current epoch, the Holocene, the 12,000 years of stable climate since during which all human civilisation developed. Format International Photography Festival in Derby, the UK’s largest photography festival, opened this weekend for its eighth edition, aiming to explore this notion of the Anthropocene by asking photographers to respond to the word “habitat”. Featuring more than 200 international artists and photographers across 30 exhibitions, the biennial is situated across independent cinema and exhibition spaces such as Quad, University of Derby and the Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The festival’s flagship exhibition, titled Ahead Still Lies Our Future, is on show at art space Derby Quad, and features work by ten photographers, brought together by curators Hester Keijser and festival director Louise Clements. “I wanted to offer up experiences concerning the complexity of our existence on …

2017-03-28T11:46:25+00:00

Bientôt (Soon), from the series Ekaterina, 2012 © Romain Mader / ECAL

Romain Mader wins the Foam Paul Huf Award

“Romain Mader’s Ekatarina is notable for the humour and irony with which he addresses serious issues: solitude, love, exploitation and the female body,” said the jury for the Foam Paul Huf Award. “In this Chinese box of a project, each layer opens to reveal a new interpretive possibility. What is real here, and what is fiction? “In the invented Ukrainian town of Ekaterina, mysteriously populated only by women, Mader – or the character he plays – looks for love. Unremarkable in appearance, he spends time with aspiring models and beauty queen hopefuls, frozen behind their smiles.” Mader, who was born in 1988, wins €20,000 plus a solo show at the Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam towards the end of 2017. The Foam Paul Huf Award is an annual prize for image-makers under the age of 35, which was set up in 2007 in memory of Paul Huf, an innovative photographer instrumental in founding the Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam in 2001. Previous winners include Daisuke Yokota (2016), Daniel Gordon (2014), Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs (2013), and Taryn Simon and Mikhael Subotzky (2007). The members of the 2017 jury …

2017-03-16T17:28:09+00:00

made in chelsea-ten spot 3

Dougie Wallace goes live and direct on BBC4

The inimitable Dougie Wallace comes out from behind the camera on 16 March, in a 30-minute documentary screened on BBC4 at 8.30pm. Part of the mini-series What Do Artists Do All Day? the programme follows Wallace on the streets of Chelsea and Knightsbridge as he shoots the images for his forthcoming book, Harrodsburg; it also shows him at work in Blackpool, and includes walk-on parts for photographer Martin Parr (who collects his work), and Dewi Lewis (who is publishing Harrodsburg). Born in Glasgow and serving in the army before getting into photography via selling used camper vans and backpacking, Wallace started Harrodsburg after reading that a man born in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea has a life expectancy of 84.4, the longest average lifespan of anywhere in the UK; boys born in Calton in Glasgow – near where Wallace grew up – have a life expectancy of just 53.9. Harrodsburg won the inaugural Magnum Photography Award in 2016, and the series will be exhibited at the printspace in Shoreditch, where the book will also be launched at 7.30pm on 21 …

2017-03-16T11:54:16+00:00

BJP Staff