All posts filed under: News

Studio 1854: The power of photography

When the DJI Drone Photography Award launched in November 2017, it called for photographers across the world to submit ideas for creative, drone-shot projects. Rather than generic aerial photography – picture perfect landscapes with little back story – the competition asked that entrants consider compelling narratives and subject matters. In reaching locations impossible on foot, these drone-shot projects would open the viewer’s eyes to new possibilities. The project was supported by DJI, the world leader in civilian drone and aerial imaging technology. DJI has a deep interest in photography and in 2017 it acquired a majority interest in Hasselblad. A series of articles written by Studio 1854 and published on BJP’s website throughout the competition period demonstrated the creative potential of drone photography. BJP’s audience were inspired: 47,825 people visited the competition entry page. After a lengthy judging process – overseen by BJP, DJI and Guardian drone photographer Graeme Robertson –Markel Redondo and Tom Hegen were selected as winners. The Salt Series, photographed by Hegen, documents salt production across Europe. Combining vivid colours and geometric …

2018-07-02T11:28:13+00:00

Chloe Dewe Mathews goes In Search of Frankenstein in the Swiss Alps

In 2016, Chloe Dewe Mathews was invited to do an artist’s residency at the Verbier 3-D Foundation in the Val de Bagnes, Switzerland. The chosen theme was the so-called ‘Year Without a Summer’ of 1816, which followed the eruption of Mount Tambora volcano in Indonesia. The eruption, which emitted a vast cloud of ash blocking sunlight across much of the world, caused temperatures to plummet, the dramatic weather changes leading to crop failure, starvation and mass migration. Two centuries later, while researching the area’s history, Dewe Mathews came across the story of a local disaster that happened because of these weather changes. Between 1816 and 1818 the Giétroz Glacier built up to form a great dam of ice, which then burst its banks and tore up the valley below, leaving a trail of destruction all the way to Lake Geneva. She went on to discover that Mary Shelley had also been in the area during that summer-less year, staying on the shores of Lake Geneva with her husband Percy Bysshe and fellow Romantic poets Lord …

2018-05-11T14:03:38+00:00

Photo London: Thomas Mailaender at Michael Hoppen

Known for his offbeat experiments with printing processes, Thomas Mailaender is an artist constantly pushing the limits of the medium. He’s worked with found images for 10 years and, as a consequence, tells me that: “I don’t think of myself as a photographer.” Often sourcing images from the internet, but equally happy to raid car boot fairs, flea markets, and charity shops, Mailaender says he is interested in “reproducing images rather than making them myself”. He is, he says, “a compulsive collector of photographs”.

2018-05-10T14:10:46+00:00

Palm Photo Prize at London’s House of Vans

Work by 120 young photographers from around the world is on show in London’s House of Vans from 10 May – 03 June. Selected from an open call for the Palm Photo Prize, the show features one image per photographer and, say the organisers, “places an emphasis on raw, engaging work”. The winners will be announced online on 04 June, having been picked out by a judging panel comprising: Karen McQuaid, senior curator at The Photographers Gallery; Joshua Coon, director, content marketing & production at Kodak; Jack Harries, editor at The Heavy Collective; and Andrea Aurland, editor in chief at Huck Magazine.

2018-05-10T13:39:55+00:00

Victorian Giants Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, Oscar Rejlander and Clementine Hawarden at the NPG

“When people think of Victorian photography, they sometimes think of stiff, fusty portraits of women in crinoline dresses, and men in bowler hats,” says Phillip Prodger, head of photographs at the National Portrait Gallery. “Victorian Giants is anything but. Here visitors can see the birth of an idea – raw, edgy, experimental – the Victorian avant-garde, not just in photography, but in art writ large. The works of Cameron, Carroll, Hawarden and Rejlander forever changed thinking about photography and its expressive power. These are pictures that inspire and delight. And this is a show that lays bare the unrivalled creative energy, and optimism, that came with the birth of new ways of seeing.”

2018-05-11T13:58:30+00:00

Ones to Watch: David Denil

Travelling to Kiev in the wake of protest, revolution and civil war, Belgian photographer David Denil set about documenting the aftermath of conflict in the minds of ordinary people still coming to terms with the country’s sharp divisions. The resulting series, Let Us Not Fall Asleep While Walking, departs from journalistic record, instead attempting to depict “the psychological state of this Ukraine looking at its future while haunted by its past and memory,” he says. “The images are metaphorical representations from the everyday life encountered where time seems frozen but dreams of hope still linger.”

2018-05-10T14:14:37+00:00

On Abortion by Laia Abril

Laia Abril is no stranger to themes of distress. Bulimia, coping with the death of a child, the asexual community, virtual sex-performer couples – these are all topics that the Barcelona-based photographer has explored and attempted to demystify with her multi-layered, story-based practice. The subjects she tackles are complex and provocative, but ones she is able to connect with by way of female empathy, “where I can be involved emotionally”, she says.

2018-05-22T10:57:29+00:00

A new photo gallery opens in London

A new photography gallery has opened in East London with its inaugural show, Reduction, Reduction, by New York based photographer Robin Broadbent. Wren London is situated a stone’s throw from Old Street station, with an exhibition space set out on street level above a studio in the basement, which will be used in Broadbent’s exhibition. Photography will be displayed on large white sheets of wood hung along the walls from metal scaffolds on the ceiling, working with the floor to ceiling windows to provide a restricted view into the gallery. “The windows have been intentionally designed so there is only one clear view into the space”, explains Jennifer Turner, director of the gallery and founder of Wren Artists. “We wanted to control the way people see the work from the outside.” During breaks between shows, vinyl sheets designed to correspond with the next exhibition will line the windows, mainly to conceal the work while they install it, but also in the hope of building anticipation as people walk past the gallery. “Being able to open …

2018-05-09T11:55:30+00:00

Photo London: the 2018 Kraszna-Krausz shortlist

First awarded back in 1985, the Kraszna-Krausz Foundation Best Photography Book prize is one of the oldest in the business. Previous winners include Sergio Larrain (with Vagabond Photographer in 2014), Susan Meiselas (with In History in 2009), Boris Mikhailov (with Case History in 2000), and Eugene Richards (with Cocaine True, Cocaine Blue in 1994); this year three contemporary image-makers have made the shortlist – Stephen Gill, Chrystel Lebas, and Dayanita Singh. Gill has been nominated for the book Night Procession, which he self-published through his imprint Nobody Books. Shot using motion-sensor cameras in rural southern Sweden, where Gill moved with his family in 2014, the book reveals nocturnal animal activity in the dark forests. The book also includes an essay by Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgȃrd, who is best-known for his series of six autobiographies, Min Kamp [My Struggle]. Chrystel Lebas won a place on the shortlist with Field Studies: Walking through Landscapes and Archives, which is published by Dutch organisation FW: Books). Her work retraces the steps of British botanist Sir Edward James Salisbury, creating new images in the same …

2018-05-09T11:24:12+00:00

Antony Cairns on electronic ink and contemporary cities

“Photography is endlessly linked to technology, it’s always moving forward with it. There are lots of ways you can reproduce a photograph, ways that are often forgotten about,” says Anthony Cairns, describing the technology behind his electronic ink images. Since realising he could freeze the display on his kindle book reader by disconnecting its power, Cairns has acquired over 500 second hand e-readers, mostly from eBay. By hacking into the e-readers he’s is able to upload his photographs, suspend them within the screen, and then remove the screen from the device’s casing. “I’m not a computer whizz kid hacker,” he says, “I just watched a lot of YouTube!” 45 of these screens are now on show at Tate Modern in Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art, showing abstract images of global metropolises.

2018-06-01T15:02:59+00:00

BJP Staff