All posts filed under: Ones To Watch

Fran © Jack Davison

Jack Davison – an interview from the BJP archives

Walking down the street with Jack Davison can be time-consuming. A sharp-suited bloke talking on the phone, a pretty young girl in a hurry, a bored construction worker seated by the side of the road, a balding old soak nursing a pint; Davison approaches each without a moment’s hesitation. After introducing himself and chatting for a few seconds he’s circling round them, or leaning over them, or down on his knees, with his camera often inches from their face. He keeps talking to them throughout, framing quickly and firing off a few shots. He’s relaxed, composed in the moment, then gives a short thanks and he’s gone, walking down the street, briefly checking his new portrait. Davison turned up at BJP’s offices on a road bike that had seen much better days, sweating under the sun, wearing a baggy white t-shirt, denim shorts and a cycling helmet. He didn’t look like a fast-emerging photographer and, like any 24-year-old, is still trying to work stuff out, to get his head around the complexities of making a …

2017-01-09T16:26:51+00:00

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Any Answers: Marton Perlaki – “Photography is a therapy for the mind”

Marton Perlaki is part of Ones to Watch, our annual Talent issue where we scour the globe for the next generation of talented image-makers set to dominate the industry. His image, from the series ELEMER, graces the cover, and this week he’s taking over our Instagram with daily snapshots and outtakes. Follow him at @martonperlaki. When was the first time you became aware of photography? How old were you? What is the primary reason you became a photographer?  My first encounter with photography was at Grammar School. I was probably around 16 years old. I originally wanted to major in drawing and painting, but the year I got admitted, the Catholic church repossessed the school, so I had no choice but to take up religious studies instead. A friend of mine then encouraged me to enter a photography school and I did. It wasn’t love at first sight. I really hated all the technical aspects of photography. I felt it distracted me from focusing on the subject I wanted to capture. It sounds a little over-romanticised, but …

2016-05-05T12:27:15+00:00

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The Talent Issue: Ones to Watch 2016

BJP

Our latest issue, Ones to Watch, is available to buy now from The BJP Shop. Find it in the App Store from 3 May and in shops from 4 May. Since 2011, we’ve dedicated an issue of BJP to identifying the best emerging talent in the photographic world – the image-makers poised for international success and set to loom large in the industry for years to come. In our annual Talent Issues, we’ve featured over 100 photographers who have gone on to firmly establish themselves in their respective fields, shining a spotlight on the work of photographers such as Diana Markosian, Max Pinckers and Mariela Sancari. This year, we’ve asked a global panel of 60 experts – including Martin Parr, Erik Kessels, Bruno Ceschel, Elizabeth Avedon and more – to nominate sixteen photographers they think represent the future of photography. The panel – made up of editors, curators, educators, gallery owners, festival directors, writers and photographers – have all weighed in and represent the full spectrum of the photographic community. We present the photographers set to make noise in …

2016-06-08T10:57:10+00:00

Winner of the ING Unseen Talent Award announced at Amsterdam’s Unseen Photo Fair

Yesterday marked the official opening of Unseen Photo Fair, the Amsterdam festival organised by Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam, Platform A and Vandejong Creative Agency, with exhibitions, events and awards taking place all over the city. Beginning with a bang, the winner of the ING Unseen Talent Award has been announced, with Luxembourger photographer Sophie Jung receiving a project production fund of €10,000. The ING Unseen Talent Award is a joint initiative between Dutch financial institution ING and Unseen, providing an international platform for new Belgian, Luxembourg and Dutch photography talent to present their work to an international audience. Jung was chosen from a shortlist of five finalists, who spent the past two months working on a photograph based on the theme ‘Who are we here for?’:  Lara Gasparotto, Olya Oleinic, Sébastien Bonin, Sophie Jung and Sjoerd Knibbeler. The jury was comprised of curatorial professionals from across the industry, including Frits Gierstberg (Curator, Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam), Kaat Celis (former Chief of Photography, De Morgen and founder of visual management company Sluitertijd), Sanne ten Brink (Head Curator, ING Collection), Duncan Forbes (Director …

2015-09-18T11:55:44+00:00

Thomas Albdorf’s manufactures beauty and uncertainty by mixing the natural and the digital

BJP

Thomas Albdorf’s still lifes are never quite what they seem – the more you look, the more the perspectives, shapes and colours shift, reflecting the Austrian photographer’s interest in manufacturing beauty and uncertainty out of the seemingly mundane. “What fascinates me when I look at art created by other people is how they engage with simple objects within their immediate reach,” he says. “I feel drawn to people who manage to create something very beautiful and charming out of almost nothing.” Albdorf’s immediate surroundings are the outskirts of Vienna, an area he wandered in search of raw material for his Former Writer series. Seizing on wood, wire, tyres and fridges, he created a kind of ‘edgelands’ trash art, sometimes adding paint to enhance the sense of uncertainty. “I used to do graffiti writing but I stopped at an early age because it’s quite superficial,” he says. “But as I was wandering the peripheries of Vienna, I saw tags and I wanted to use a spray can again. “I like the idea because one of the easiest tools to use …

2015-09-14T12:31:20+00:00

Thomas Brown’s design-led, constructed imagery

Describing his practice as concept-driven, Thomas Brown is fascinated by form, structure and composition. His work usually involves still life, installation and the landscape, and he often collaborates with like-minded set designers, stylists and cinematographers. His commissions for Vogue, Wallpaper, The New York Times and Coca-Cola, among others, allow him to work on self-initiated projects that often attract further commissions from clients. Brown, who studied photography at the Arts Institute at Bournemouth, was assistant to advertising photographer Dan Tobin Smith for several years, and in 2009 signed to Webber represents. He set up a studio in London two years later, which allowed him to “experiment, play and develop” his practice. “I have been really inspired by the upsurge in still life, installation and constructed imagery,” he says. “People definitely take more notice now, and there are more opportunities to share your work with a bigger audience. “Work that may not have had a home before can now be seen by thousands of people on blogs and websites. This is incredibly motivating and allows you to be …

2015-09-10T11:36:30+00:00

The surreal dreamscape of Ukrainian photographic duo Synchrodogs

Since Synchrodogs featured in our September 2012 issue, the Ukrainian photography duo have continued to gather momentum. Commissions for Tania Shcheglova and Roman Noven include Croatian eyewear design Sheriff & Cherry, a shoot for New York Magazine, and a portrait assignment for Dazed & Confused photographing their compatriots, the protest group Femen. Their recent project, Reverie sleep, sees Synchrodogs explore their dreams – the space between wake and sleep that is both familiar and remote. “The project deals with the stage of non-rapid eye movement sleep, during which some people may experience hypnagogic hallucinations caused by the natural process of falling asleep,” they explain. “Experimenting with those lucid dreaming techniques, we usually wake ourselves up in the middle of the night to make a note of what we have just seen, gathering our dreams to be staged afterwards.” This project has a distinctly surreal feel, but the duo’s work always builds on the uncanny and the strange, often including naked or semi-clothed figures hiding their faces and holding contorted poses. Their models are often shown against …

2015-09-14T12:44:43+00:00

Patrick Willocq went from corporate multinationals to the DR Congo to photograph the land of his childhood

As a child, Patrick Willocq spent seven years in the Democratic Republic of Congo; with a camera given to him by his father, he recorded the people and places he encountered. In 2009, 27 years after leaving, he returned, and the trip proved a revelation. “I totally reconnected with myself,” he says. “My passion for photography revealed itself stronger than ever. This helped me face the fact that I was fundamentally not happy with my life.” Willocq had been working for corporate multinationals in Asia for nearly two decades, but he abandoned his successful career to resettle in DR Congo. “I feel at home in the remote villages among the locals,” he says. “I have always been struck by the beauty, simplicity and dignity of daily life there. I want to go beyond the images that stigmatise the nation; for instance, I wish to bear witness to the peace that prevails in the Western part of the country.” His first series, On the road from Bikoro to Bokonda, bears testimony to the everyday challenges faced by the Batwa …

2015-09-07T11:10:50+00:00

How to photograph corruption

BJP

Photographing the ‘unphotographable’ has become Mari Bastashevskiʼs mission. Born in Saint Petersburg in 1980, she tackles entrenched and often concealed systemic failures such as corruption, abuse of power, propaganda or the economies of conflict. “I have done some frontline war work, but the result felt like ‘phoning in’. Since then, I have become a lot more focused on the system rather than its victims or results,” she says. After spending three years in Russia and the North Caucasus to produce File 126, which documents cases of abductions, Bastashevski is currently working on distinct yet concomitant series. In 2013, she was awarded a Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund grant for State Business, a scrupulous and intricate study of the paradoxes of the global arms trade industry. She is also continuing It’s Nothing Personal, an ongoing project about the contrast between the corporate branding of western surveillance firms and Privileged/Confidential, an informed look at the abuses committed by officials in the Balkans. Using both text and images, her work has a forensic quality. Precision, distance and restraint inspire her aesthetic. “Beauty and spectacle are …

2015-09-03T12:19:27+00:00

Photographing Saudi women as they evolve in British society

Since moving from Saudi Arabia to the UK in 2007, Wasma Mansour has turned her lens towards other women who have made a similar choice. Single Saudi Women takes an almost scientific approach to the ways in which these émigrés evolve in contemporary British society through three carefully crafted typologies – portraits of the women in their homes, still lifes of significant possessions in their homes, and studio images of veils packed in bags. “In the past, my awareness of photography had been limited to its use as an illustrative tool and as a means for providing visual evidence,” says Mansour, who recently completied a PhD in photography at London College of Communication. “Through collaborating with the participants when building their portraits, I became increasingly aware of the need to protect their anonymity. This led me to further revise and expand my use of photography.” Rather than imposing a personal view on how her subjects should be depicted, Mansour enters into a dialogue with each, involving them in the process – from setting the 4×5 camera to proofing the Polaroid test before taking the …

2015-08-28T11:55:10+00:00

BJP Staff