All posts filed under: Photobooks

Coney Island, 1953 © Marvin. E Newman 2017, Howard Greenberg Gallery, courtesy of TASCHEN

Photobook: City of Lights – The Undiscovered New York Photographer Marvin E Newman

He’s 89 but he’s just got his first monograph – Marvin E Newman, a native New Yorker who’s been taking photographs since the 1940s. Born in 1927 in New York, Newman was one of the first people to graduate with a degree in photography from the Chicago’s Institute of Art and Design; heading back to NYC in 1952 he then became one of the first to shoot the city in colour. Building up a remarkable body of work there and beyond, he also shot sports photography commissions for magazines such as Life, Look and Sports Illustrated. Represented by the Howard Greenberg Gallery and lauded by Eastman House, MoMA, and the International Center of Photography, Newman’s work has been known to collectors for years, but first came to wider attention through the book New York: Portrait of a City, edited by former BJP editor Reuel Golden. The new monograph, which includes some 170 images from the 1940s-80s, is also edited by Golden, and includes an essay by New York-based writer, curator and critic Lyle Rexer. City of Lights: The Undiscovered New …

2017-04-27T16:22:41+00:00

From 11.41 @ Michal Luczak, courtesy of the artist

Photobook: 11.41 by Michal Luczak and Filip Springer

At 11.41pm on 07 December 1988, a cold and snowy day, Armenia was struck by a 7 degree Richter earthquake. Some 25,000 people died and a further 514,000 were made homeless; the city of Spitak was worst affected, with a third of the population killed and all but one of its buildings destroyed. Since then very little has changed in Armenia, but the political landscape around it has been entirely reshaped. The USSR collapsed just a few years after the earthquake in 1991, with the disaster coming to symbolise its failure when Mikhail Gorbachev was forced to call for international aid to handle it. In Spitak the USA and Germany built small wooden houses for those who had been displaced, and the Soviet government promised more permanent homes would follow within two years. In 2013, when Michal Luczak visited, people were still living in the huts. The Polish photographer decided to delve deeper with a documentary project, and was soon joined by the writer Filip Springer. “We don’t ask about that day. They don’t talk,” they write in their resulting …

2017-04-27T14:55:08+00:00

From the series 'Full Colour' © Will Sanders, courtesy of the artist

Photobook: Will Sanders’ Full Colour

“The world has become a spectrum of grey. We drive silver cars. We wear black clothes. We paint our houses white. When did we all get so boring? When did we let self-expression take a back seat?” argues Will Sanders in Full Colour, his vibrant new photobook looking at the brighter side of life. “Full Colour is about recognising the beauty in otherwise unnoticed moments and freezing them forever in the hope that other people will appreciate them,” Sanders tells BJP. “I’ve wanted to do a book for years but as time went on all my series kind of morphed into a giant series, so I found it harder and harder to imagine how to channel it into a book.” The solution came via a friend, the photographer, designer and KesselsKramer employee Gijs Van Den Berg, who advised him about a year ago to make a book focussing simply on colour. Sanders loved the idea and paired up with designerVan Den Berg to make it, successfully raising the money to do so via Kickstarter. Sanders is a successful commercial photographer, who’s represented …

2017-04-26T17:06:44+00:00

A design by Yoshikazu Yamagata, writtenafterwards © Todd Selby

On show: Todd Selby and his world of creative interiors

Back in 2008, Todd Selby shot Tom Wolfe at home in Prague for a magazine. The journal published a couple of the photographs but Selby, disappointed he couldn’t show more of the “amazing photos” he’d been able to take, decided to set up a website and post them online. Calling it theselby.com, he mailed some of his contacts to tell them what he was up to, and attracted about ten people per day. The number went up to 40 per day, then a thousand, then suddenly it snowballed, and he found he’d attracted 10,000 people in one day and an article in The New York Times. Less than ten years later the self-taught Selby attracts up to 100,000 people in a day to his site, has worked with brands such as Louis Vuitton, Fendi and Nike, and has published three books The Selby is In Your Place (2010), Edible Selby (2012) and Fashionable Selby (2014). He’s also shown his work at Colette in Paris, and now has his first solo museum show – The Selby’s House at Daelim …

2017-04-25T16:18:43+00:00

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Q&A: Paul Hutchinson on shooting b-boys, butterflies and U-Bahnhofs

Born in 1987 in Berlin, Paul Hutchinson graduated from the University of the Arts, Berlin in 2012, and from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London in 2014. While in London he assisted Wolfgang Tillmans, and by 2015 he had published his first book – B-Boys, Fly Girls and Horticulture. He has gone on to publish two more, Wildlife Photography in 2016 and Schmetterlinge [Butterflies] in 2017. Hutchinson has won various awards and grants, and has shown his work at Galerie Mansart, the Berlinische Galerie Museum of Modern Art and The Photographers Gallery. The recent exhibition Perfect Storm, at the NRW Forum in Dusseldorf, included Hutchinson’s photographs alongside work by other fast-emerging image-makers such as Thomas Albdorf, Andrey Bogush, Vendula Knopova, Maurice van Es and Nikolas Ventourakis. BJP: You were a bit of a tearaway at school, how did you get into photography? Paul Hutchinson: I was never a typical troublemaker or bully, it was always about curiosity and trying things off the beaten track, which obviously hit some borders in the context …

2017-04-20T15:12:08+00:00

Rosy Nicholas from the book Hackney Studios © Jenny Lewis

Photobook: Jenny Lewis’ Hackney Studios

Hackney has long been celebrated as London’s creative hub, but soaring rent increases are pushing the painters, illustrators, filmmakers, jewellers, ceramicists and fashion designers out of their studios. Jenny Lewis spent four years shooting these creatives in their workspaces and her new book, Hackney Studios, stands as a celebration – and perhaps a commemoration – of a very special time and place. Hackney Studios is published by Hoxton Mini Press, priced £20. www.hoxtonminipress.com  

2017-04-06T13:02:13+00:00

Maghera’s Cross viewing spot near Portrush, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, during Justin and Jackie's week long holiday. Justin has been dating Jackie for over 20 years. It’s kind of unexpected to see Justin maintaining this relationship and for such a long period of time. I know I have plenty of very functioning friends who struggle forming relationships. From the series Big Brother © Louis Quail

Project: Louis Quail’s Big Brother

“If you are on the lowest rung of society, if when you get on a bus people turn away from you, it’s nice to be noticed,” says Louis Quail. “It’s nice to be seen.” We’re talking about his project Big Brother, which recently won the portfolio review prize at Format International Photography Festival and will soon be published as a book. Shot over the last six years, it’s a portrait of Quail’s older brother Justin, who is now 58 and has suffered from schizophrenia for his whole adult life. Quail doesn’t shy away from the obvious effects of his brother’s illness, showing his wrecked shoes and chaotic flat, and including police notes and medical records that speak of medication, sectioning and arrest. But his project also shows another side to Justin – one less familiar, perhaps, in our conception of the mentally ill. It includes Justin’s excellent drawings and paintings, his poetry, and his love of bird watching; it also shows his girlfriend Jackie, who also has mental issues and is an alcoholic, but who …

2017-04-06T16:01:16+00:00

The Haystack, 1844, from The Pencil of Nature by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-77). Salted paper print © The RPS Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The V&A announces a new Photography Centre in London

Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new centre will open in Autumn 2018 and more than double the V&A’s current photography exhibition space. The opening will be accompanied by a museum-wide photography festival, a new digital resource, and a new history of photography course run with the Royal College of Art. The V&A plans to run events and activities in the new centre, and will continue to expand the facility. Phase Two will see the museum add more gallery space, and create a teaching and research facility, a browsing library, and a studio and darkroom which will enable photographers’ residencies. The new centre comes as the V&A transfers the Royal Photographic Society’s collection from the Science Museum Group, which was formerly held in the National Media Museum in Bradford. The transfer adds over 270,000 photographs, 26,000 publications, and 6000 pieces of equipment to the V&A’s holdings – which was already one of the largest and most important in the world, including around 500,000 works collected since the foundation of the museum in 1852. The RPS collection includes …

2017-04-06T16:45:30+00:00

Tokyo, 2015. @David Gaberle, courtesy of the artist

Photobook: Metropolight by David Gaberle

Five years ago David Gaberle went through “a really rough time” after moving to London. A friend suggested he pick up a camera to help process his experience, and he found that photography “really eases the experience of the sensory overload that comes with living in a big city”. By 2015 he was ready to embark on an ambitious new project inspired by this work, and invested all his savings in travelling to the world’s biggest cities to shoot them. On the move for eight months and changing location every few weeks, he covered over 3600km. “The constant search was the happiest time of my life,” he says. Originally from the Czech Republic, Gaberle studied anthropology back home and has a researcher’s perspective on the modern metropolis. “In the big cities, people spend less time with other people which means they have more time to become different, developing themselves,” he says. “There are more interesting personalities in the cities.” At the same time, though, he finds big cities can be “really dehumanising”, because “they have an effect on how …

2017-04-04T14:36:17+00:00

BJP Staff