All posts filed under: Documentary


The Long Way Home by David Molina Gadea


David Molina Gadea’s The Long Way Home began when he was on a year-long placement helping out at refugee centres in Belgium. “It was a placement with the European Voluntary Service, which Britain will soon not be a part of any more because you just voted to leave the European Union,” the Spaniard tells me in a Skype interview a week after the Brexit vote. “It lasts for one year. You go to another country in Europe, you do some work there, the EU pays for your travel and stay, and you learn the language. I went to an organisation in Belgium that arranges voluntary services and training courses, and one of the things they do is volunteer at some of the many refugee camps in Belgium. So I went there as a coordinator. We did activities and helped the staff paint the centres.” “It was also about sharing and being with the refugees, who are from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and many other countries. It was about providing some distraction from the boredom of being there.” …



A moment in time: An exploration of Cuba through the years

When documentary photographer Manuello Paganelli first landed in Cuba in 1988, he felt as if he had been transported back 20 years. “I saw Cuba as a black and white world,” he says, as he recalls how he stood out for the modern clothes he wore, and how the only cars visible on roads shattered by pot holes were sun-bleached Russian Moskovitz’s. “I thought I’d landed back in time, or like in scene out of the movie Twilight Zone, where strange things happen and are unresolved.” Paganelli, who is half Italian and half Cuban, travelled to the then largely commercially and photographically unexplored country to reconnect with lost relatives. He did so, but discovered that with each visit his curiosity for the Cuban way of life grew. Today, he has made over 60 trips. His new book, Cuba: A Personal Journey 1989-2015, is a collection of 115 black and white photographs, capturing the happenings of daily life of ordinary people during a time when having a bar of soap or a bottle of cooking oil was seen as a …


Aly Gadiaga, Catania, Sicily, Italy, June 2015. Aly, 26, left Senegal and spent three years travelling to Libya, washing dishes in Mali and Burkina Faso in order to earn the money to board one of the dangerous convoys and cross the Sahara. Aly speaks Wolof (a language of Senegal), French, Italian and English fluently. He has lived in Catania for two years and has not yet received a work permit. Everyone in the market knows him as “Gucci”, a slang term for “good” or “all right”, because of his remarkably positive attitude. He has not seen his family for six years.
Images © John Radcliffe Studio.

Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016

On 13 and 19 April last year, two migrant boats capsized off the coast of Libya, with the loss of more than a thousand lives. Many of those who drowned were refugees, fleeing civil war, and therefore protected under the 1951 Refugee Convention, but their deaths won little sympathy on the pages of some of the UK’s biggest newspapers. On 17 April, The Sun columnist Katie Hopkins wrote an article comparing migrants to cockroaches or the norovirus, adding that Britain needed gunships, not rescue boats, to send them back. “No, I don’t care,” she wrote. “Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show me skinny people looking sad. I still don’t care.” As the so-called migrant crisis continued unabated, so too did the negative press. By July, the Daily Mail, Britain’s most-read newspaper brand and Hopkins’ new employer, was running headlines like “The ‘swarm’ on our streets”, calling for the army to go to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. A year later, the Daily Express warned of …


A newly wedded couple embrace in a passionate kiss before exiting St Francis church in the historical centre of Palermo. June 2012

Photographing Sicily’s Modern Mafia

What’s the genesis of this project? Why were you compelled to see this project through? I started to work on Terra Nostra in 2009 in an effort to voice both my need to reconnect to my homeland and to show the degree of decay caused by the pervasive influence of Cosa Nostra on the island. I knew since the beginning that this story would have been a long-term commitment and after seven years I felt I didn’t want to risk repeating myself after having explored a good deal of aspects related to the theme of my project. Sometimes you just need to complete a project and bring it to a positive and good end in order to work on the next thing. How have the mafia impacted on your life? To some degree the Mafia’s presence in Sicily impacts everyone, even the ones that live in denial and don’t want to admit it. Hollywood has shown and glamourised only the mere violent aspect of Cosa Nostra, but everyone’s life is routinely affected when the coasts of …


SUBWAY NEW YORK, 1977-1984 © by Willy Spiller 2016

Willy Spiller’s Photographs from the New York Underground 1977 – 1984

In 1979, there were 250 serious crimes reported in the New York subway system – per week. There were six murders in the first two months alone. No other subway in the world was more crime-ridden and infamous. New Yorker Willy Spiller braved the labyrinth transport system for a photography series that says so much about the modern tone and texture of the world’s most iconic city. In a foreword to a new photobook, published by Sturm & Drang, Dr. Tobia Bezzola writes of Spiller’s achievements.



Photo Kathmandu 2016 vows to reflect 20 years since the war in Nepal

This year marks 20 years since the start of the Maoist rebellion in Nepal. This war and its aftermath have left deep scars on many Nepali lives, and still affect the country at large. Last year, Nepal was hit by several horrific earthquakes, which killed over 8,000 people and left over 800,000 families homeless. A new festival in the country’s capital is exploring such devastation through photography.


BJP Staff