All posts filed under: Documentary

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The traditions, biases and ranks inside modern British military spaces

Over 2014, Ross Young photographed the military barracks near his home in Belfast. Driving to work in the morning, the 25-year-old would pass the barracks, seeing scattered buildings beyond barbed-wire walls. “I became really fascinated by the modern military,” he says. “What they do, how they have changed, who they are, what they stand for now.”     The nephew of a lieutenant colonel, he gained access to the barracks and photographed everything: portraits of the soldiers, the buildings, beds, dorms, gyms and churches. But it was the communal eating areas that held his gaze. “Everything is split by rank. The junior rank, middle rank and officers each have their own spaces, and each one is visibly different,” he says. “They had such an impactful personality. They revealed so much to me about life in the Army. It shows the difference in the ranks; what soldiers have to go through to work their way up.”     He was born in Killyleagh, a suburban area to the south of Belfast, and now lives in the …



Shoot Ball, Not Gun

Earlier this year, Sebastian Gil Miranda won First Place in the Campaign category at the Sony World Photography Awards 2015 for his project Shoot Ball, Not Gun. The documentary project took place on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, where he visited one of the most dangerous slums in Argentina where two rival gangs violently struggle for turf and power. Focusing on the town’s children, he photographed them playing football within the courtyard of the Chapel Our Lady of Luján. The children, for whom hearing indiscriminate gunshots at night is common place, are connected to these gangs, with fathers, brothers and family friends caught up in the bloodshed. With entries to the 2016 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards closing soon, we caught up with Miranda to discuss the project.     What’s the genesis of the project? Usually I work helping NGOs and social foundations. In this case, I knew that Uniendo Caminos, a foundation dedicated to educational support for children in various slums of Buenos Aires, needed content to offer workshops in a centre that …


A young couple kiss passionately by a red wall in a Newquay nightclub. July 2001

Cowboys, cheerleaders and the stars and stripes: classic Americana through British eyes

“Dallas is BIG,” writes British photographer Peter Dench in the forward to his book Dench Does Dallas. “The flags are big, as are the signs; sky; storm drains; food portions; restaurant tips; drive thrus; cows; cow horns and ‘brestaurants.’” So are his larger-than-life photographs of the city, which capture cheerleaders, junk food, baseball matches, men in cowboy hats and a healthy dose of starts and stripes. A celebrated photojournalist, Peter Dench is most well known for his iconic images of the British doing what they do best – drinking. As the title suggests, these pictures are all taken in the scorching-hot capital city of Texas, Dallas. Instead of travelling by car, Dench decided to traverse the 40-mile across Metroplex by foot and on public transport, in the middle of July in 35-degree heat.   The project began when Dench was approached by Olympus, who wanted him to test run their new camera, the E-M5. “They asked me where I would like to photograph,” Dench says. “And I said America. They then asked where, and I raced …


Masterclass LATAM

World Press Photo announces the inaugural Masterclass Latin America

World Press Photo’s annual Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam annually, has been running for over 20 years, selecting photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world and offering expertise and support. Last year’s intake included Bego Antón, Raphaela Rosella and Sarker Protick (featured in our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014). In an effort to cast a wider, more diverse net, the World Press Photo Foundation is implementing a new series of regional masterclasses to develop global talent. The first regional event is the World Press Photo Masterclass Latin America, run in conjunction with the Fundación Pedro Meyer, the organisation dedicated to “the reflection, interpretation and investigation of the image and the new media”. It will be held in Mexico City between the 7th and the 11th of December 2015. The 12 photographers joining Masterclass Latin America have been announced; made up of seven men and five women of nine nationalities: Alejandro Kirchuk, Argentina; Dominic Bracco II, USA, based in Mexico; Emilia Lloret, Ecuador; Felipe Dana, Brazil; Jasmine Bakalarz, Argentina; Jonas Wresch, Germany, …


magnum pp

BJP & Magnum Photos: Professional Practice Workshops 2016


Led by leading Magnum photographers and industry professionals, the programme presents incredible training opportunities for early & mid-career photographers. Each workshop is a two-day photographic masterclass that focuses on demystifying the business of the industry, establishing a professional network of industry contacts, understanding the requirements of the market and identifying entry realistic routes into employment. The first day focuses on lectures from key speakers on specific areas of the photographic industry, giving behind the scenes tips and practical advice explaining how to work and succeed in their area of expertise. A second day of portfolio reviews lead by industry specialists will provide photographers with an honest, constructive and critique of existing work. Workshops will be held at the Magnum Print Room in east London. Each workshop is open to 40 applicants on a first come first served basis. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Editorial photography How to succeed in the editorial market Sat 6 & Sun 7 February 2016 Photography and the art market How to get an exhibition and sell your work Sat 12 & Sun 13 …


Camopi, February 2015 © Christophe Gin for the Carmignac Foundation

Christophe Gin wins 6th edition of the Carmignac Foundation’s Photojournalism Award

Christophe Gin has been awarded the 6th edition of the Carmignac Foundation’s Photojournalism Award, winning a €50,000 grant for Colonie, his work ruminating on lawless areas in France. Created in 2009, the award has sponsored photojournalism in conflict zones and neglected regions; previous winners include Robin Hammond (featured in our latest Portrait issue) and recent Magnum Photos nominee Newsha Tavakolian. The award was mired in controversy last year, after Tavakolian contended that the foundation’s benefactor, French investment banker Edouard Carmignac began to interfere with with the presentation of her work to an “unacceptable” degree. The foundation disputed her remarks, claiming the postponing of her project was due to purported threats to the photographer’s safety, which it said Tavakolian reported. It would seem any acrimony has abated, however – Tavakolian’s work will be part of the Carmignac Foundation’s upcoming retrospective at Saatchi Gallery, London. It features 40 works produced since the award’s inception by all laureates – Kai Wiedenhöfer, Massimo Berruti, Robin Hammond, David Monteleone, Tavakolian and this year’s winner Christophe Gin. Colonie, Gin’s winning project delved into French Guiana, a region in …


Louis Stettner: A Station of The Metro

A young girl in her Sunday best fixedly follows the pools of light thrown down on the magnificent stone floor, her shadow keeping her company amidst the suits and stoic silence of Penn Station, New York City. On a commuter train drawing out of the station, a business man curls up for some shuteye, the dark windows framing his exhaustion. Louis Stettner’s Penn Station, New York, a new photobook from Thames & Hudson, is full of such theatrical composition and voyeuristic opportunism; momentary observations of the working and office classes in post-war America. “When things work out, it’s like a miracle,” says nonagenarian Louis Stettner, talking from the South of France, from where he’s working on an upcoming nature series.     “I had the light, the camera was very good, a wonderful lens. Film back then was better,” he says. “Today, it would be quite impossible to get permission to photograph in the railway station. A lot of forces came together which made it very favourable.” If time proves the value of anything, as Stettner has often …


The squatters, ravers and travellers who exported British festival culture to Europe

In 1992, thousands of New Age travellers, ravers and gypsies converged on Castlemorton Common in Worcestershire for a week-long free festival. Widely reported in the press, the event attracted an estimated 20,000 to 40,000 people and became impossible for the police to close down. Tom Hunter, then a student at the London College of Printing, was involved in the free party scene but somehow missed the event; he soon realised he’d let a seminal moment pass him by and vowed not to do so again.     Castlemorton led directly to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, however, which outlawed outdoor parties that included “sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats” in the UK. So, three years later, Hunter and a squad of fellow squatters were on their way to Europe in a decommissioned double-decker bus, complete with sound system and provisions. Over the ensuing months, the group travelled to folk festivals in France, hippie gatherings in Austria and beach parties in Spain, with the bus – Le Crowbar – doubling …


Photographing the rapid emergence of modern Azerbaijan


“I could almost see the shiny new world rising out of the ruins,” says Ukrainian photographer Mila Teshaieva, describing the changes she witnessed on a visit to Azerbaijan in 2010, two decades on from declaring independence from the Soviet Union. “The process of building a new state and a new national identity, something that would normally take many decades or even centuries, appeared to so rapid and so radical. But the ruins were still there, seen most strongly in the souls and minds of people who have grown up with and been educated in Soviet Union ideologies, but who have suddenly had to adapt to new ideas.”   Promising Waters looks at life in the area around the Caspian Sea, specifically Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan, countries that have established independence away from the Soviet Union, and that possess rich oil and gas reserves. Teshaieva is most interested in the enormous challenge these countries face in defining themselves as independent nation states. Her project touches on the promise of wealth created by the countries’ natural resources, but also …


The urban alienation of Moscow’s harsh winters

On the one hand, Catalan photographer Salvi Danés’ series Black Ice, Moscow depicts daily life in the Russian capital; on the other, it addresses more universal fears about personal alienation and isolation. The 31 year old, who was born in Barcelona and has lived in the city all his life, decided to turn his attention to Moscow after completing a project in Tokyo. “It was the winter of 2011-12 and my intention was to face another urban reality, to find common elements along the same lines as the previous project,” he says. “My first project focused on the alienating urban dynamics of Tokyo – a modern, highly connected society with new technologies and an economic and social situation admired by many nations. I wanted to transport this concept to a city with different traditions.” Danés spent almost a month photographing in Moscow, looking for busy places where he could stop and observe without being noticed. He talks of the city as being “full of companions but empty of partners”, and in most of the images, people are pictured alone. Many …


BJP Staff