All posts filed under: Documentary

April 28th, 2015. Baltimore, Maryland. Police shoot tear gas to clear the street. Protesters, media, police and national guard converged near the corner of North and Pennsylvania Avenue during protests.

Creating the new symbols of protest imagery

Protest imagery has taken on a refreshed sense of vibrancy in recent years, thanks to the rise of smartphone photography, social media and a new generation of young, politically engaged activists. But while smartphones have allowed for a wider range of representation, the rising tide of documentation has also raised all boats, including photojournalists like Natalie Keyssar who’d perhaps still be photographers in any other era. The collective appetite for dynamic photography that helps portray the raw edges of global issues has never been greater, and this sense of drama is present in Keyssar’s work, which has been seen in publications like Bloomberg Businessweek, California Sunday, The Fader and The New York Times. Newly signed by international photo agency INSTITUTE, on her website she describes herself as “primarily [focusing] on youth culture, activism, and class”, and in recent months Keyssar has focused her lens on scenes of activism and protest around the world. We caught up with her over email to ask what compels her to cover these issues.     Your recent work has …

2016-01-13T14:33:00+00:00

Inside The Danish School of Media and Journalism – the global incubator of great photojournalists

“I remember my time at there as intense. It was hard work, and we experimented a lot, but I also remember having a lot of fun and being constantly immersed in photography, says award-winning photojournalist Laerke Posselt of his time the Danish School of Media and Journalism in Aarhus, Denmark. “Because of the tough application process, the ones who get in are students who really want it, who worked for it, and who have the drive it takes.” Year in and year out, this small school on the east coast of Jutland has produced more prize-winning photojournalists  than any other school photography school, including Mads Nissen, whose image Jon and Alex of a gay couple sharing a moment of intimacy in a flat in St Petersburg, won the World Press Photo Picture of the Year 2015. For a small school, with only two permanent teachers, Søren Pagter and Mads Greve, and a rotating crew of Danish and international experts, the school seems to have a secret formula for inspiring students to produce passionate  photojournalism and …

2016-01-13T14:39:14+00:00

Las Valkyrias de Bolivia - Riccardo Bononi

Las Valkyrias de Bolivia – the women wrestlers of La Paz

Earlier this year, Riccardo Bononi won first place in the Sport category at the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards for his project, Las Valkyrias de Bolivia. Bononi visited Bolivia on an unrelated research project, only to find himself photographing in the poorest neighbourhood in La Paz. The Valkyries are a group of women farmers from the countryside who come into the city and enter the ring for a series of wrestling bouts. The women, who raise their children all by themselves and work between the fields and the urban street markets, were the perfect example of migration from the countryside to urban environments, as well as a striking example of feminine strength.With entries to the 2016 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards closing soon, we caught up with Miranda to discuss the project, we spoke to Bononi about getting up close with his subjects. What’s the genesis of the project? My initial reasons for going to Bolivia were far away from the wrestling ring of El Alto. I had the opportunity to collaborate with a researcher from SOAS, …

2015-12-16T12:21:47+00:00

Comings and Goings, Brick Lane, 1986

London Life: Colin O’Brien’s reflections on a changing city

Hackney-based Colin O’Brien has carved out of a reputation as one of the most important photographers documenting life in the capital. The steady buzz around his work continues to grow with the release of his latest book, London Life, published by Spitalfields Life Books, and his new exhibition at the new Leica Store City gallery based at The Royal Exchange, London. Now in his mid 70s, he is a delight to interview – witty, pithy and passionate. Over a coffee, O’Brien reflects upon a career in photography that started when he was eight, taking pictures of his friends playing together on the bomb sites of postwar London. Over decades O’Brien has built up a vast archive of images, so it is perhaps unsurprising that anyone viewing his work becomes acutely conscious of the changing face of life in the city he records.     These days Hackney itself seems to be a metaphor for constant urban renewal, something O’Brien is all too aware of. “When we first moved to Hackney [in the early 1980s], a …

2015-12-02T14:06:10+00:00

Unsentimental portraits of Ireland’s most notorious travelling communities

At best, images of Britain and Ireland’s travelling communities are romanticised; bow-topped caravans populated by gruff adults and grubby-faced children. At worst, travellers are characterised as crime-addicted, violent gangsters, living a law onto themselves, taking what they want without a moment’s thought for the rest of this Sceptered Isle. Northern Irish photographer Chris Barr, who earned his MA in photography from the University of Ulster, wanted more. He wanted to understand who these ancient, prideful, private communities are. And so he has spent the last ten years photographing travellers throughout Ireland as part of his ongoing series Katabasis.  The project began as an exploration of the horse within traveller culture. “The horse has long been at the heart of the travelling community”, says Barr. “I was interested in how travellers identified their horses. It’s a system handed down from father to son and sits outside the formal methods normally used to identify horses.” The project evolved into an exploration of gangsterism within the travelling community, focusing on the infamous Irish traveller Pa Rubber Óg O’Reilly. Barr recalls his …

2015-12-01T14:41:22+00:00

5 001

The traditions, biases and ranks inside modern British military spaces

Over 2014, Ross Young photographed the military barracks near his home in Belfast. Driving to work in the morning, the 25-year-old would pass the barracks, seeing scattered buildings beyond barbed-wire walls. “I became really fascinated by the modern military,” he says. “What they do, how they have changed, who they are, what they stand for now.”     The nephew of a lieutenant colonel, he gained access to the barracks and photographed everything: portraits of the soldiers, the buildings, beds, dorms, gyms and churches. But it was the communal eating areas that held his gaze. “Everything is split by rank. The junior rank, middle rank and officers each have their own spaces, and each one is visibly different,” he says. “They had such an impactful personality. They revealed so much to me about life in the Army. It shows the difference in the ranks; what soldiers have to go through to work their way up.”     He was born in Killyleagh, a suburban area to the south of Belfast, and now lives in the …

2015-11-26T17:57:11+00:00

Firing

Shoot Ball, Not Gun

Earlier this year, Sebastian Gil Miranda won First Place in the Campaign category at the Sony World Photography Awards 2015 for his project Shoot Ball, Not Gun. The documentary project took place on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, where he visited one of the most dangerous slums in Argentina where two rival gangs violently struggle for turf and power. Focusing on the town’s children, he photographed them playing football within the courtyard of the Chapel Our Lady of Luján. The children, for whom hearing indiscriminate gunshots at night is common place, are connected to these gangs, with fathers, brothers and family friends caught up in the bloodshed. With entries to the 2016 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards closing soon, we caught up with Miranda to discuss the project.     What’s the genesis of the project? Usually I work helping NGOs and social foundations. In this case, I knew that Uniendo Caminos, a foundation dedicated to educational support for children in various slums of Buenos Aires, needed content to offer workshops in a centre that …

2015-11-24T17:12:40+00:00

A young couple kiss passionately by a red wall in a Newquay nightclub. July 2001

Cowboys, cheerleaders and the stars and stripes: classic Americana through British eyes

“Dallas is BIG,” writes British photographer Peter Dench in the forward to his book Dench Does Dallas. “The flags are big, as are the signs; sky; storm drains; food portions; restaurant tips; drive thrus; cows; cow horns and ‘brestaurants.’” So are his larger-than-life photographs of the city, which capture cheerleaders, junk food, baseball matches, men in cowboy hats and a healthy dose of starts and stripes. A celebrated photojournalist, Peter Dench is most well known for his iconic images of the British doing what they do best – drinking. As the title suggests, these pictures are all taken in the scorching-hot capital city of Texas, Dallas. Instead of travelling by car, Dench decided to traverse the 40-mile across Metroplex by foot and on public transport, in the middle of July in 35-degree heat.   The project began when Dench was approached by Olympus, who wanted him to test run their new camera, the E-M5. “They asked me where I would like to photograph,” Dench says. “And I said America. They then asked where, and I raced …

2015-11-24T15:24:58+00:00

Masterclass LATAM

World Press Photo announces the inaugural Masterclass Latin America

World Press Photo’s annual Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam annually, has been running for over 20 years, selecting photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world and offering expertise and support. Last year’s intake included Bego Antón, Raphaela Rosella and Sarker Protick (featured in our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014). In an effort to cast a wider, more diverse net, the World Press Photo Foundation is implementing a new series of regional masterclasses to develop global talent. The first regional event is the World Press Photo Masterclass Latin America, run in conjunction with the Fundación Pedro Meyer, the organisation dedicated to “the reflection, interpretation and investigation of the image and the new media”. It will be held in Mexico City between the 7th and the 11th of December 2015. The 12 photographers joining Masterclass Latin America have been announced; made up of seven men and five women of nine nationalities: Alejandro Kirchuk, Argentina; Dominic Bracco II, USA, based in Mexico; Emilia Lloret, Ecuador; Felipe Dana, Brazil; Jasmine Bakalarz, Argentina; Jonas Wresch, Germany, …

2015-11-17T17:08:13+00:00

magnum pp

BJP & Magnum Photos: Professional Practice Workshops 2016

BJP

Led by leading Magnum photographers and industry professionals, the programme presents incredible training opportunities for early & mid-career photographers. Each workshop is a two-day photographic masterclass that focuses on demystifying the business of the industry, establishing a professional network of industry contacts, understanding the requirements of the market and identifying entry realistic routes into employment. The first day focuses on lectures from key speakers on specific areas of the photographic industry, giving behind the scenes tips and practical advice explaining how to work and succeed in their area of expertise. A second day of portfolio reviews lead by industry specialists will provide photographers with an honest, constructive and critique of existing work. Workshops will be held at the Magnum Print Room in east London. Each workshop is open to 40 applicants on a first come first served basis. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Editorial photography How to succeed in the editorial market Sat 6 & Sun 7 February 2016 Photography and the art market How to get an exhibition and sell your work Sat 12 & Sun 13 …

2015-11-17T13:09:22+00:00

BJP Staff