All posts filed under: Documentary

Out of the Way © Elena Anosova, which won second prize in the Daily Life - Stories categories at the 2017 World Press Photo. World Press managing director Lars Boering says the paucity of women in photojournalism is one of the key issues he wants to debate at the organisation's many new initiatives this year

World Press Photo’s Lars Boering and the fight against “fake news”

Lars Boering, managing director of World Press Photo, joined the organisation in January 2015, just before that year’s prize was announced. It was an award beset with issues, as it emerged that more than 20% of the final-round entries had been disqualified for image-manipulation; then one of the winners – Giovanni Troilo, who had won first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Story category – was disqualified, when World Press found that an image he said had been shot in Charleroi, Brussels had been taken in Molenbeek. Boering countered with a new code of ethics for entrants, which meant that images submitted to the 2016 prize were more thoroughly checked – and were found to be less prone to manipulation. This year the issue with manipulation was at about the same level as in the 2016, he says, which leaves him to conclude that “it is still a very big media challenge”. “It’s not about World Press Photo, it’s industry-wide and we need to debate it,” he tells BJP. “It is something we feel very strongly about – there …

2017-02-13T17:31:06+00:00

New Age of Walls © Washington Post

Washington Post’s Age of Walls wins WPP’s Innovative Storytelling Prize

Donald Trump’s Mexican wall may have got the headlines over the last year, but walls – in a very physical sense – are being built between nations all over the world, at a pace and urgency under-reported by the world’s most viable media organisations. “In many ways, the barrier-building is being driven by fear,“ The Washington Post wrote in the introduction to New Age of Walls, a multimedia investigation detailing each of the 63 border walls and barriers, many of them newly constructed, that are now dividing nations across four continents. New Age of Walls was the winner of the Innovative Storytelling category in World Press Photo’s Digital Storytelling contest, an award for a piece of journalism designed specifically for the online space. “Most of the new walls are being erected within the European Union, which until recently was nearly borderless,” The Post wrote. “Britain is going further, rolling up its bridges to the continent by voting to exit the E.U. “Intended to counter migrants and terrorist attacks, these moves are not limited to Europe. In the Middle …

2017-02-16T13:02:33+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image ©

WPP-winning image “a staged murder for the press” says jury chair

“It’s a great news picture in the traditional way, and obviously the photographer himself demonstrated an extraordinary amount of composure to get it,” says Stuart Franklin, chair of the 2017 World Press Photo jury, of the winning image this year – which shows Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey. “But it is a staged murder for the press in a press conference, so there will be questions. It is a premeditated, staged murder at a press conference, which arguably you could put in the same envelope as the beheading of a prisoner in Raqqa [Syria]. I think that’s the dilemma one has about the picture.” And, continues Franklin, while he can’t go into detail about the judging process, “I can tell you, I didn’t vote for the photograph because of that dilemma”. “It is the moral issue that is a concern for me, personally,” he adds. For Franklin, Burhan Ozbilici’s series made a worthy Spot News winner, and he adds that “he did his …

2017-02-16T13:46:52+00:00

Taking A Stand In Baton Rouge © Jonathan Bachman, Thomson Reuters. First prize, Contemporary Issues - Singles

The 2017 World Press Photo Contest winners are announced

The contest attracted 80,408 images, from 5034 photographers from 125 countries, and the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 45 photographers from 25 countries – Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Pakistan, Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Syria, New Zealand, Turkey, UK, USA. The World Press Photo of the Year is a shot by Turkish Associated Press photographer called Burhan Ozbilici, with an image he has simply titled An Assassination in Turkey. Showing Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, on 19 December 2016, the image is drawn from a wider series shot that night which won first place in the Spot News – Stories category. Other notable wins include Thomson Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman’s photograph of 28-year-old nurse Ieshia Evans, standing in front of riot police during a protest against police brutality outside the Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana, USA, on 9 July 2016, which one first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Singles …

2017-02-16T13:45:29+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image © AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici. World Press Photo of the Year, from a series which won first place in the Spot News - Stories category

Burhan Ozbilici wins the World Press Photo of the Year

Burhan Ozbilici wasn’t even working when he shot his World Press Photo-winning image – he was catching up with a friend, in an art gallery 150m from his home in Ankara. But, as the exhibition was a series of images of Russia, and the Russian ambassador Andrei Karlov was giving a speech, the Associated Press photographer “decided to do my job” and took his camera along. Standing “two or three rows back” with the other members of the press, he started to record the unremarkable moment – then found himself at a murder scene, as gunman Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş shot the ambassador dead, then stopped to proclaim “revenge for Syria and Aleppo” over his body. “I immediately understood it was a very important incident,” says Ozbilici. “Everyone ran away and threw themselves on the ground, or behind walls, or under tables, shouting and panicking. I thought running away was not a solution anyway, and decided to remain calm to risk antagonising the gunman further. I just kept shooting, changing my position to get a better angle, trying to capture this …

2017-02-13T13:02:56+00:00

From the series “Mädchenland” © Karolin Klüppel, winner Portait category and Gold Award, Felix Schoeller Photo Award 2015

Kingdom of the Girls: The alternate reality where women rule the world

That world exists, if you know where to look. Berlin-based photographer Karolin Klüppel’s pictures of rare matriarchal communities in India and China – which won the 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award – invite us to do exactly that. Born in 1985, Klüppel developed an interest in alternatives to patriarchy while studying photography at the School of Art and Design in Kassel, where her final project deconstructed gender through soft, fragile portraits of the male nude. On graduating in 2013 she embarked on a self-financed trip to India, where she had a residency lined up with the Vice-Versa Foundation in Goa. Initially the plan was to stay half a year in India before heading to China, to photograph the Mosuo, a matriarchal society in the Himalayas, but she ended up spending nine months in Mawlynnong, a Khasi village in the State of Meghalaya, northeast India. The photographs she shot there became the portrait series Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls), for which she won the prestigious 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award. Klüppel had read about the Khasi while …

2017-02-23T16:46:32+00:00

Kaja Rata 1_670

Mining the cosmos in Kaja Rata’s Kajnikaj

Kaja Rata lives in the Silesia region of Poland, a place where “nothing unusual happens”. “People are working hard as a miners, or drinking hard while they’re looking for the next job,” she says. “But the mines are slowly disappearing, because it’s an unprofitable industry right now. Basically, I can tell that I live in vanishing location.” She’s opted to break up the experience by making Kajnikaj, a series whose title means “here and there” in the local dialect. Documentary but also somehow fantastical, it focuses in on the “grey destroyed monuments of the Soviet era” and a celestial colour palette to create something that looks cosmic. “When I look at the sky over the decaying town, and when I build rickety contraptions, I am trying to find means to escape from the place I was born and raised,” she says. “Even though I know that it is a futile attempt.” Born in 1987 , Rata has been studying photography seriously for eight years; she graduated from the photography BA at University of Arts in Poznań in 2015, …

2017-02-10T09:32:30+00:00

D is for Deconstruct. Photos are often reliable documents that show things as they truly are. But just as you cut and paste with paper, scissors and glue, so too can you deconstruct and rebuild a photo – snipping, clipping and nipping as you please. Image from the series “I want to be...”, 2014, Kid’s Wear magazine, vol. 40 © Achim Lippoth, taken from the book ABC Photography

Making photography as easy as ABC

ABC Photography, a children’s guide to photography featuring images by Martin Parr, Wolfgang Tillmans, Nan Goldin, Alec Soth, Sebastiao Salgado and many more, opens at the V&A Museum of Childhood this weekend. Inspired by the recent book edited by Jan von Holleben – who also shoots children’s books himself – the project takes one photographic concept per letter to explain ideas such as deconstruction, composition, exposure and perspective. The text, by Monte Packham, is child-friendly and witty, and draws on the images to make a satisfyingly holistic whole. An exhibition by Tom Hunter called Searching for Ghosts also opens at the V&A Museum of Childhood this weekend, featuring work made with children living on the Boundary Estate. ABC Photography is free, and is open until 11 June in London’s V&A Museum of Childhood. ABC Photography, ed Jan van Holleben, is published by Tarzipan Books. Searching for Ghosts by Tom Hunter is open until 21 January 2018.

2017-02-09T13:54:22+00:00

From the series South London Bikelife © Dan Giannopoulos

How South London Bikelife sidesteps the negative stereotypes

In 2014, masked bikers started riding around Dan Giannopoulos’ neighbourhood in Greenwich, South London. The local and national press was instantly critical, but Giannopoulos was intrigued, and soon decided to start shooting them. “I like exploring subcultures and fringe communities; this was something that really sparked that interest and it was right on my doorstep so I had no excuse to not pursue it,” he says. “At the time I was shooting a project on the banger racing community, and moving straight into this seemed like an obvious thing to do…It felt like a natural segue – they explore similar themes of working class communities developing intriguing subcultures.” After a failed start with a group on the South London/Kent borders, Giannopoulos met a larger community riding near the O2 arena in April 2015; sending images to the riders after their first meet-up, he quickly formed a working relationship. What struck him was how friendly and humorous the riders were, he says, contrary to their reputation “They all looked out for each other,” he says. “Defiantly so. They all …

2017-02-16T13:38:28+00:00

From the series Manhattan Sunday © Richard Renaldi

Richard Renaldi reflects on shooting Manhattan Sunday

It’s Saturday night, and darkness has spilled across the city, transforming Manhattan’s sidewalks into a catwalk of bacchanalia, spotlighted by street lamps and neon piping. Clusters of sinewy figures in tank tops lean on metal railings outside favourite haunts such as Studio 54 or Paradise Garage, hips cocked, smoking cigarettes. A wall painting of a large, fleshy tentacle reaching out of a rolling wave frames a set of black doors with signs indicating ‘General Admission’ and ‘VIP Only’. Stepping into a hidden world, you head downstairs and join a steadily expanding crowd of bodies swaying to tribal house beats, swirling in artificial mist and the odour of hormone-spiked sweat laced with chemical stimulants. Faces blur. Everything begins to lose focus. It’s just past midnight when we join photographer Richard Renaldi’s journey through the night. The timestamp [00.07] captions the first image – a shiny, half-full dance floor – in his new photobook, Manhattan Sunday, published by Aperture. Shot over five years, the book delineates a night out on New York’s gay clubbing scene, celebrating its …

2017-02-16T13:39:12+00:00

BJP Staff