All posts filed under: Fashion

Kate Moss © Mario Testino

Vogue at 100: A Century of Style

British Vogue, the most illustrious and influential magazine in the world, synonymous with enduring style and an unfaltering position at the forefront of fashion, will unearth it’s archives to the public with a new exhibition to mark the launch of Vogue’s centenary celebrations. “Fashion and portrait photography are Vogue’s lifeblood,” says Robin Muir, curator of Vogue 100: A Century of Style. Muir faced the momentous task of sifting through the British fashion bible’s entire visual history to date. “After looking through the nearly 2000 issues, I can say with all honesty, that every time I find something new, something unexpected, something magical; and that I think is the power of photography.” The exhibition, which opens 11 February 2016, displays over 280 prints from the Condé Nast archives and beyond. “We wanted to go right back in time and find the original prints,” says Muir, adding, “and if these prints show tears and cracks, then so much the better, for these are objects with a story to tell.” Launched in 1916, when the First World War …

2016-02-05T16:39:13+00:00

Flavinia - Miss Africa Dream Picture

Sistaaz of the Castle: fashion dreams of Cape Town’s trans sex workers

Dutch photographer Jan Hoek and fashion designer Duran Lantink have always shared an interest in working with models that are different. In his documentary photography, Hoek’s subjects range from homeless people who “look like kings” to heroin addicts with a modelling dream. Lantink uses amateur models in his shows, while employing unconventional design techniques and recycled fabrics to symbolise the different layers of society. Discovering the powerful, unique looks of South Africa’s transgender sex worker community was a coincidence, but one that instantly captured both their imaginations. In Sistaaz of the Castle, Hoek and Lantink zoom in on six girls from transgender support group Sistaazhood, part of the Cape Town sex workers’ organisation SWEAT. Shot under a bridge beside the capital’s castle – the closest thing to a home for most of the girls – Hoek’s photographs show the realities of their lives in parallel with the extraordinary inventiveness that goes into creating their customised outfits. The images express a different story, one that focuses on the girls’ intuitive sense of fashion, rather than the hardships …

2016-01-28T14:15:43+00:00

Steve McQueen for Fantastic Man

Ten Years of Fantastic Man – the groundbreaking men’s style magazine

“By now,” writes Gert Jonkers in parentheses, “Thom Browne and I have worked our way through a bottle of champagne at the exclusive Soho House, and we’ve cabbed to Il Cantinori, a swanky restaurant in the East Village, where we’re at a table in less than no time – even though the place is packed.” “Wow. I feel like we’re on a date,” says Browne, who had agreed to be interviewed for the first time for a new menswear magazine launched in 2005, titled Fantastic Man. As reported by Jonkers, the co-founder of the magazine, they had just discussed Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein, the importance of a snugly tailored suit, of how one should wear trousers. Their exchanges were, in some respects, the kind of thing you might read in any fashion magazine. Yet this moment, an editor and revered designer slightly tipsy in the close confines of a restaurant, captures the singular achievement of Fantastic Man – a revealing, casual and glamorous confidence that allowed an independent magazine published by two unknown designers …

2016-02-12T11:14:46+00:00

Model Muriel Maxwell in white sunglasses putting on lipstick, wearing red-white-and-blue turban, andv holding a red-and-white striped bag

Horst’s High Style at The Düsseldorf Photo Weekend

Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann, later known as Horst P. Horst, is to receive his first major retrospective in the country of his birth at the fifth edition of the Düsseldorf Photo Weekend. An icon of fashion photography, Horst photographed more than 90 covers for Vogue, including Marlene Dietrich, Salvador Dali and Rita Hayworth. With more than 250 photographs from a 60-year career on display, the exhibition shows Horst’s central casting in Paris’ 1930s fashion scene – known now as the golden age of couture. Organised by London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the exhibition takes its cue from the original London show, which orientated Horst’s images in near-darkness, with black and white photographs only illuminated by spot-lights. This is something of a homecoming for the photographer who coined the famous term: “Fashion is an expression of the times. Elegance is something else again.” Horst was born in the East of Germany in 1906. As a 24-year-old, he moved to Paris to study architecture under the iconic Le Corbusier, before meeting, and becoming the lover, of the French Vogue photographer George Hoyningen-Huene. …

2016-01-19T18:29:08+00:00

Daniel Sachon, An Air of Prontezza

The teenage fashion photographer mixing advertising and pop culture

Fashion photographer Daniel Sachon is only 19, but in the last five years he’s racked up experience working for clients and publications like Models1, Select Models, Papercut Magazine, Fiasco Magazine and Slang Magazine. Disruptive Innovation, his first solo exhibition, is currently on show at the Londonnewcastle Project Space in east London. It features key images from his nascent body of work, including his playful reimagining of iconic photos of Marilyn Monroe. Sachon presents ‘Millennial Marilyn’ with contemporary products – an iPhone, a Starbucks cup.  Perhaps a comment on rampant consumerism and the bastardisation of iconography or merely combining two recognisable ‘brands’ from different eras, Sachon is keen to explore this dynamic.  “I’m inspired just as much by the art world as I am by the worlds of advertising and pop culture,” Sachon says. “Despite being inspired by both worlds and seeing so many similarities between the two, society seems to constantly disparage this link which I find inspiring and frustrating in equal measure.” “In this exhibition, I try to walk the fine line between these …

2016-01-13T14:32:41+00:00

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Playing between the lines of fashion, photography and art

Benjamin Whitley only completed his BA in photography at Camberwell College of Art last year, and already he has already been featured in the Telegraph and Vogue.co.uk, shot the SS14 campaign for Mako, and shown work at the South London Gallery. Born into a family of image makers – his mother, grandfather and aunt have all been photographers at some point, and his other grandfather is a painter – he has a sophisticated approach that he applies to fashion, film and photography, and the juncture at which it meets art.           “Fashion is interesting due to its construction in terms of image,” he says. “It has a likeness to real time but inherently it’s completely hyperreal. There’s an element of performance that is really exciting; it allows for a collision of style and roleplay that is unique to the medium. I’m interested in how clothing can take on its wearer and vice versa, and how fashion imagery can create completely unrealistic and opulent scenarios. The fantasy of it all is really glamorous.” Attracted to “the way …

2015-11-18T16:05:14+00:00

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The photographer inspired by stoners to mix high fashion with everyday objects

Having graduated from New York’s School of Visual Arts four and half years ago, David Brandon Geeting has already exhibited at Art Basel Miami Beach and shot for the likes of Nylon, The Fader and The New York Times T Magazine. He is clearly a rising star, but modestly comments that “every time I make new work, I feel like I’ve never made art before,” adding, “I also have a hard time learning from experience; I hit my head on the same low ceilings every time. I hope my work looks as if someone who just hit their head on a ceiling is trying to make art for the first time.”       These images come from a shoot for Surface magazine and show off clothes by Maison Martin Margiela, but Geeting is irreverent about high fashion too, noting that he and creative director Zak Klauck paired the clothes with everyday items because “the Margiela couture was so ridiculous”. Done at “the cheapest studio I could find, with off-brand strobes, a modest collection of seamless …

2015-11-09T14:49:48+00:00

Willem de Kooning and Brigid Berlin

Unseen Polaroids from the heyday of Andy Warhol’s Factory

Last summer archivist, editor and curator Dagon James was finishing up a book he was working on about Billy Name’s black and white photographs of Warhol’s Factory. Brigid Berlin, Warhol’s best friend and staunch member of The Factory, was contributing some text to the book when Dagon asked her about her famous collection of Polaroids, and whether or not she would ever consider publishing them. She agreed, and a short while later Dagon found himself sitting at a large table in her apartment sorting through nearly 4000 previously unseen snaps that had been crammed into boxes in her house and in storage for decades. “They were just scattered around her life, so we had to pull them all together and organise them and figure out what was there. That was kind of the adventure,” recalls Dagon. “She hadn’t even looked at them in years. We would pass Polaroids around and talk about them, figure out what should be in the book and why. It was very collaborative.” The Polaroids themselves are more artefacts than photographs. …

2015-11-10T17:43:58+00:00

Phoebe English A/W 2015

Calm before the storm: quiet moments behind the scenes of London Fashion Week

“There’s nothing quite like it – weeks of preparation for fifteen minutes of beautiful, elegant theatre – a moving gallery piece, a graceful veneer over the absolute chaos backstage. And it happens every season,” says Kensington Leverne. In his new photo zine Powerful Morning Energy Volume.2, Leverne gets an intimate look behind the scenes at London Fashion Week. The black-and-white images find the quiet moments before the shows begin – models idling in changing areas, stylists tending to costumes, catwalks being prepped for expectant audiences. Leverne, who studied Contemporary Photography at University for the Creative Arts in Rochester, fell into backstage photography as a seventeen-year-old, while on work experience with a production company. He admits his skills as a production runner left much to be desired, but constantly took pictures on set. Through cultural osmosis, we’ve become more than familiar with the artful tailoring and impossibly beautiful models that showcase these events. Leverne pulls back the curtain to show the industry in its most testing moments, with 5am call times, 2am finishes and a lot of …

2015-11-03T12:48:21+00:00

The squatters, ravers and travellers who exported British festival culture to Europe

In 1992, thousands of New Age travellers, ravers and gypsies converged on Castlemorton Common in Worcestershire for a week-long free festival. Widely reported in the press, the event attracted an estimated 20,000 to 40,000 people and became impossible for the police to close down. Tom Hunter, then a student at the London College of Printing, was involved in the free party scene but somehow missed the event; he soon realised he’d let a seminal moment pass him by and vowed not to do so again.     Castlemorton led directly to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, however, which outlawed outdoor parties that included “sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats” in the UK. So, three years later, Hunter and a squad of fellow squatters were on their way to Europe in a decommissioned double-decker bus, complete with sound system and provisions. Over the ensuing months, the group travelled to folk festivals in France, hippie gatherings in Austria and beach parties in Spain, with the bus – Le Crowbar – doubling …

2015-11-03T12:47:05+00:00

BJP Staff