All posts filed under: Fashion


How Peter Lindbergh’s new realism defined 90s fashion photography

A recent release brings together over 400 images by the German photographer Peter Lindbergh. Drawn from his work in fashion, culture and urban environments, the book’s release coincides with a major retrospective in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Here BJP investigates a collection curated by Thierry-Maxime Lorio which seeks to posit Lindbergh as the progenitor of a ’different vision on fashion photography’.


Jamie Hawkesworth: Off the Cuff

Recently, waiting outside a magazine editor’s office, I picked up a publication produced by the newly reinvigorated Spanish luxury brand Loewe. An unassuming grey linen cover is wrapped in part by a colourful folded poster, an almost abstract image of contrasting textiles. Alongside an interview and a quote from Wordsworth, the tall, sober pages contain a 14-image essay that combines black-and-white with colour photographs; constructed studio images with others in a documentary style. Some are peculiar, wet landscapes, contrasting with rich, intimate interiors, a kind-of portrait and some sort of fashion photographs. Schoolboys are playfully balancing bags on their heads like silly helmets or hiding under patterned beach towels in a studio. The emotional measure of the book is  gentle, warm and kind, and this overrides the lack of ‘sense’ being made. I am reminded of how I felt when I first saw Julian Germain’s wonderful For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds Of Happiness, published a decade ago. I think this is the loveliest photography book I have seen this year …


Jack Davison’s Street Fashion at Foam

Walking down the street with Jack Davison can be time-consuming. A sharp-suited bloke talking on the phone, a pretty young girl in a hurry, a bored construction worker seated by the side of the road, a balding old soak nursing a pint; Davison approaches each without a moment’s hesitation. After introducing himself and chatting for a few seconds, he’s circling round them, or leaning over them, or down on his knees with his camera, often inches from their face. He keeps talking to them throughout, framing quickly and firing off a few shots. He’s relaxed, composed in the moment, then a short thanks and he’s gone, walking down the street, briefly checking his new portrait. Davison turned up to BJP’s offices on a road bike that had seen much better days, sweating under the sun, wearing a baggy white T-shirt, denim shorts and a cycling helmet. He didn’t look like a fast-emerging fashion photographer. Like any 25-year-old, is still trying to work stuff out, to get his head around the complexities of making a career …


Turkina Faso, Back Home with Alice

Kati Turkina, a London-based fashion photographer with a huge following in her native Russia, spent her teenage years in Essentuki, an industrial city of 100,000 people ringed by mountains in the North Caucasus. Essentuki is often referenced in the poetry of Alexandr Pushkin, but it’s barely known by anyone outside Russia. It’s home, Turkina says, “to the biggest mountain in Europe – Elbrus. It is a beautiful area, but so poor and wild now. In the past, men from the mountains could just steal a girl, and that was that. Now it is more peaceful.” Turkina has a more peaceful life now, as well. Her teenage years were, she says, “so full of intensity and adventures and new things.” She describes herself as “a wild, small woman, covered in piercings, against everyone, in such a hurry to live.” “I was just crazy,” she says. “I started to drink alcohol, and was only interested in boys and going out. I had good marks at school, but they told me I had a lot of behaviour problems. …


Kate Moss © Mario Testino

Vogue at 100: A Century of Style

British Vogue, the most illustrious and influential magazine in the world, synonymous with enduring style and an unfaltering position at the forefront of fashion, will unearth it’s archives to the public with a new exhibition to mark the launch of Vogue’s centenary celebrations. “Fashion and portrait photography are Vogue’s lifeblood,” says Robin Muir, curator of Vogue 100: A Century of Style. Muir faced the momentous task of sifting through the British fashion bible’s entire visual history to date. “After looking through the nearly 2000 issues, I can say with all honesty, that every time I find something new, something unexpected, something magical; and that I think is the power of photography.” The exhibition, which opens 11 February 2016, displays over 280 prints from the Condé Nast archives and beyond. “We wanted to go right back in time and find the original prints,” says Muir, adding, “and if these prints show tears and cracks, then so much the better, for these are objects with a story to tell.” Launched in 1916, when the First World War …


Flavinia - Miss Africa Dream Picture

Sistaaz of the Castle: fashion dreams of Cape Town’s trans sex workers

Dutch photographer Jan Hoek and fashion designer Duran Lantink have always shared an interest in working with models that are different. In his documentary photography, Hoek’s subjects range from homeless people who “look like kings” to heroin addicts with a modelling dream. Lantink uses amateur models in his shows, while employing unconventional design techniques and recycled fabrics to symbolise the different layers of society. Discovering the powerful, unique looks of South Africa’s transgender sex worker community was a coincidence, but one that instantly captured both their imaginations. In Sistaaz of the Castle, Hoek and Lantink zoom in on six girls from transgender support group Sistaazhood, part of the Cape Town sex workers’ organisation SWEAT. Shot under a bridge beside the capital’s castle – the closest thing to a home for most of the girls – Hoek’s photographs show the realities of their lives in parallel with the extraordinary inventiveness that goes into creating their customised outfits. The images express a different story, one that focuses on the girls’ intuitive sense of fashion, rather than the hardships …


Steve McQueen for Fantastic Man

Ten Years of Fantastic Man – the groundbreaking men’s style magazine

“By now,” writes Gert Jonkers in parentheses, “Thom Browne and I have worked our way through a bottle of champagne at the exclusive Soho House, and we’ve cabbed to Il Cantinori, a swanky restaurant in the East Village, where we’re at a table in less than no time – even though the place is packed.” “Wow. I feel like we’re on a date,” says Browne, who had agreed to be interviewed for the first time for a new menswear magazine launched in 2005, titled Fantastic Man. As reported by Jonkers, the co-founder of the magazine, they had just discussed Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein, the importance of a snugly tailored suit, of how one should wear trousers. Their exchanges were, in some respects, the kind of thing you might read in any fashion magazine. Yet this moment, an editor and revered designer slightly tipsy in the close confines of a restaurant, captures the singular achievement of Fantastic Man – a revealing, casual and glamorous confidence that allowed an independent magazine published by two unknown designers …


Model Muriel Maxwell in white sunglasses putting on lipstick, wearing red-white-and-blue turban, andv holding a red-and-white striped bag

Horst’s High Style at The Düsseldorf Photo Weekend

Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann, later known as Horst P. Horst, is to receive his first major retrospective in the country of his birth at the fifth edition of the Düsseldorf Photo Weekend. An icon of fashion photography, Horst photographed more than 90 covers for Vogue, including Marlene Dietrich, Salvador Dali and Rita Hayworth. With more than 250 photographs from a 60-year career on display, the exhibition shows Horst’s central casting in Paris’ 1930s fashion scene – known now as the golden age of couture. Organised by London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the exhibition takes its cue from the original London show, which orientated Horst’s images in near-darkness, with black and white photographs only illuminated by spot-lights. This is something of a homecoming for the photographer who coined the famous term: “Fashion is an expression of the times. Elegance is something else again.” Horst was born in the East of Germany in 1906. As a 24-year-old, he moved to Paris to study architecture under the iconic Le Corbusier, before meeting, and becoming the lover, of the French Vogue photographer George Hoyningen-Huene. …


Daniel Sachon, An Air of Prontezza

The teenage fashion photographer mixing advertising and pop culture

Fashion photographer Daniel Sachon is only 19, but in the last five years he’s racked up experience working for clients and publications like Models1, Select Models, Papercut Magazine, Fiasco Magazine and Slang Magazine. Disruptive Innovation, his first solo exhibition, is currently on show at the Londonnewcastle Project Space in east London. It features key images from his nascent body of work, including his playful reimagining of iconic photos of Marilyn Monroe. Sachon presents ‘Millennial Marilyn’ with contemporary products – an iPhone, a Starbucks cup.  Perhaps a comment on rampant consumerism and the bastardisation of iconography or merely combining two recognisable ‘brands’ from different eras, Sachon is keen to explore this dynamic.  “I’m inspired just as much by the art world as I am by the worlds of advertising and pop culture,” Sachon says. “Despite being inspired by both worlds and seeing so many similarities between the two, society seems to constantly disparage this link which I find inspiring and frustrating in equal measure.” “In this exhibition, I try to walk the fine line between these …


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Playing between the lines of fashion, photography and art

Benjamin Whitley only completed his BA in photography at Camberwell College of Art last year, and already he has already been featured in the Telegraph and, shot the SS14 campaign for Mako, and shown work at the South London Gallery. Born into a family of image makers – his mother, grandfather and aunt have all been photographers at some point, and his other grandfather is a painter – he has a sophisticated approach that he applies to fashion, film and photography, and the juncture at which it meets art.           “Fashion is interesting due to its construction in terms of image,” he says. “It has a likeness to real time but inherently it’s completely hyperreal. There’s an element of performance that is really exciting; it allows for a collision of style and roleplay that is unique to the medium. I’m interested in how clothing can take on its wearer and vice versa, and how fashion imagery can create completely unrealistic and opulent scenarios. The fantasy of it all is really glamorous.” Attracted to “the way …


BJP Staff