All posts filed under: Fashion

The Polish student photographer breaking into the fashion industry before she’s even graduated

Most fashion photography students dream of shooting with top agencies, but few can say they’ve achieved this while still at art college. Digital photography student Angelika Wierzbicka can, though. She is graduating from Ravensbourne this summer and has been photographing models from agencies including Next, IMG, Select, Models1, Storm and Premier, building up an impressive collection of editorial tearsheets in just a few years. Originally from Poland, the 21-year-old has produced work for Coco Magazine, Hunger TV and Material Girl magazine. “Fashion is really important to me, not only in photography but also in my personal life,” she says. “I love shooting fashion because I get to create beautiful imagery that doesn’t exist in real life; it’s almost like a dream. Some images can look so simple and effortless that people don’t realise how much work has gone into making them.” The shoot for Material Girl came about after Wierzbicka got in touch with stylist Savannah Baker. Together they created a series of images that riff on different shades of pink and other complementary pastel colours. …

2015-08-18T18:01:00+00:00

The British fashion photographer equally at home in Preston and Paris

Effortlessly moving between documentary and fashion, editorial and commercial assignments, Jamie Hawkesworth is a photographer who is steadily making a name for himself. On the one hand, he is quite at home documenting passers-by in the grade II-listed Preston Bus Station, the future of which hangs in the balance, or photographing a British polo contest at Cowdray Park, as he did for Man About Town. On the other, he has shot campaigns for designers Céline and Marc Jacobs, and has been featured in magazines such as i-D and Paris Vogue. In light of this impressive CV, Hawkesworth’s ability to turn his hand to whatever comes his way seems to know no bounds. Self Publish Be Happy’s Bruno Ceschel, who nominated Hawkesworth for our One to Watch issue in January 2014, explains what drew him to the photographer’s work: “Jamie has this kind of romantic, street photography aesthetic. Stylistically, he’s the younger brother of photographer Alasdair McLellan, in terms of his interest in documentary aesthetics and a certain kind of casting. Jamie often photographs working-class teenagers, and in his personal work Alasdair photographed young …

2015-08-13T16:18:33+00:00

Shooting Stars: Capturing the “arrogance and vulnerability” of the famous

BJP

Mathieu César’s aesthetic may be classic, but the approach is resolutely contemporary, and that mix has seduced some of the biggest players in the fashion world – from the former editor of Vogue Paris, Carine Roitfeld to Christian Lacroix, the woman behind the French fashion label. “Referencing past masters of the fashion image in the simplicity of his contrasted composition, Mathieu César subverts the classical genre by capturing a contemporary generation of beautiful and damned subjects in sometimes surreal scenes that somehow manage to feel uncontrived,” says another fan, Anne Bourgeois-Vignon, creative content director at Nowness. “His photographs of models, musicians and assorted cool kids flirt with emotion and raw beauty, and his subjects blend arrogance and vulnerability.” A former hairdresser, César got his break with a short film he made of his brother, the ballet dancer Jean-Sébastien Colau. For two months, the French cinema chain MK2 showed the documentary before every feature. He quit his job, joined a production company, and within six weeks was in Mongolia on assignment for Louis Vuitton. “They asked me to shoot videos and photos. …

2015-08-11T12:58:53+00:00

Spain’s lost generation of young women partying like there’s no tomorrow

BJP

“The project started in 2007 when the economic crisis started in Spain,” says Bree Zucker about Girlfriend, her project on the apocalyptic partying of a group of young recession-battered Spanish lesbians. “The project follows one group of women, this lost generation. They call them the ‘nini’ generation in Spain; ‘ni estudia, ni trabaja’ (not studying, not working). My specific interest is one circle of women, but in the larger context it’s about this lost generation of young women.” At a time when 26 per cent of the Spanish population was unemployed and 56 per cent of those under 24 without a job, this lost generation represented a ticking time bomb of frustration, boredom and anger for Spain. Many young Spaniards have emigrated to other European countries to escape the lack of opportunity. But for those without the skills, training or linguistic ability, there was another solution; to stay in Spain and party like there’s no tomorrow. This was the side of Spain that Zucker focused on after attaching herself to a charismatic young woman called Boli. “I met Boli …

2015-07-24T13:26:00+00:00

Still from A Bout de Souffle

Breathless cool: the enduring influence of the Nouvelle Vague

The Nouvelle Vague began, more or less, with Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless (1960), and it came in a rush. Upstart and “arsehole” Michel (Jean-Paul Belmondo) is a man in motion. On the run and racing off in a stolen car before his female accomplice has time to get in with him, he speeds down the motorway, cursing anyone who dares slow his breakneck pace. Michel embodies a fugitive brand of modernity, too fast and fleeting to pin down, so even Godard’s innovative editing is jumpy and restless – and yet he will come crashing to a halt in Paris, while he waits on his American lover Patricia (Jean Seberg) to decide whether she will move on with him to Rome. Patricia wants to stay and to finish her studies – and yet far from representing the stasis of the past, she is in fact younger than Michel, sports a thoroughly modern hairstyle, and wants her own independence, rather than to play a pre-written rôle in Michel’s story.

2015-07-06T15:25:55+00:00

© Olivia Rose

Olivia Rose’s Boy London

“This is one of my good friends Dapper,” Olivia Rose points out, as we pore over the many strikingly wistful close-ups that fill her portfolio. “He was arrested for carrying a corkscrew, for which he was going to open a bottle of wine. He went to prison for that! Oh, and this is Terry. Look at his double grill. His son’s name is Terry, and his dad’s name is Terry; he’s such a sweetheart, you know. He likes dancing to Haim.” Rose is not one to shy away from the complex realities that exist within her work. The male-orientated portraits feature not the faces of your typical pin-up, agency model, but real lads and men, fresh off the street. Her repertoire of male muses originate from all walks of life; drug dealers, gang members, young London lads off of the local council estate – you name it. They have all been captured by Rose’s lens. She is leading a new wave of photographic talent who, frustrated with the fashion industry’s stagnant stereotypes, are breathing life …

2015-05-16T16:00:57+00:00

© Nick Knight

Showstudio – Nick Knight’s digital fashion concept

Digital fashion started in earnest in 2000, when photographer Nick Knight launched Showstudio.com. The site hosted the first-ever live fashion show the following year – a project called Sleep, in which nine models, dressed by stylists, retired to separate rooms in the Metropolitan Hotel in London for a night’s sleep. At midnight, Showstudio.com viewers started logging in to watch the models on webcams as they tossed and turned, becoming gradually more unkempt. Knight then captured stills from the footage and uploaded them – pixellated stills, from which viewers could see form, colour and texture, but no definition. It was considered one of the most exciting fashion photography concepts in modern times. Before our phone interview, I watch Knight on a live stream editing photos from a Victoria’s Secret shoot. “I started shooting today on a [medium format camera],” he says, “then gave up and started shooting on my iPhone because I just couldn’t get the sensitivity to light. The iPhone 6 is incredibly sensitive to light.” For Knight, the image is never about the technology …

2015-05-16T16:01:27+00:00

Bara Prasilova – Evolve

“Sometimes I forget to breathe when I’m working on a shoot,” says Bara Prasilova, who doesn’t consider herself a fashion photographer, though much of her livelihood comes from commercial and fashion shoots. “There’s often total quiet on the set when I’m shooting an editorial for a magazine.” She plans each shot with near military precision: carefully storyboarded or sketched beforehand, Prasilova even makes some of the props herself. “The shots are often prepared for several hours,” she says. “Clothes, hair and make-up are arranged within one millimeter accuracy, and I discuss every detail with my stylists.” Prasilova almost never improvises, she says, and because she isn’t “saying anything urgent” in her shoots, the results tend to be static and calm. “I don’t often work with emotions; what I value is perfect lighting, focus and technical perfection.” Yet Evolve, the series that won Prasilova the Hasselblad Masters 2014 in the fashion and beauty category, is fraught with emotion, albeit in the highly stylised, meticulous manner in which Prasilova approaches her work. The series examines the delicate, often fragile threads …

2015-04-17T13:55:07+00:00

Working Process

“Alexander McQueen’s exceptional collection, the most ambitious we have seen this season, was as much a slap in the face to his industry, then, as it was a brave statement about the absurdity of the race to build empires in fashion,” wrote The New York Times about the designer’s Autumn/Winter 2009 collection, which he presented in Paris. “The clothes he sent out were a parody of couture designs of the last century, spoofing Dior’s New Look and Givenchy’s little black Audrey Hepburn dresses, as well as their reinventions by new designers at those companies in the last decade – himself included. It was a bit of a Marie Antoinette riot, poking fun at all the queens of French fashion.” For McQueen, who is quoted as saying that the entire business was “such a cliché”, the goal with this particular collection was to show how quick the turnover in fashion was. “There is no longevity,” he told The New York Times. That was in March 2009 – a year before he took his own life at his home …

2015-04-17T14:02:00+00:00

"Sans titre", Cover, 2015. Image © Jeannie Abert, France.

Hyeres looking at you

The shortlist is out for this year’s International Festival of Fashion & Photography in Hyeres, including ten photographers drawn from across Europe and beyond. This year is the 30th time the festival has taken place, and publisher Gerhard Steidl took part in a high-profile photography jury that also included: Anne Cartier-Bresson, director of the Atelier de Restauration et de Conservation des Photographies de la Ville de Paris (ARCP); Jean-Luc Monterosso, founder and director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris; and the photographer Sølve Sundsbø. The shortlisted photographers, who were drawn from more than 700 entries, are: Jeannie Abert, France; Sushant Chabria, India; Wawrzyniec Kolbusz, Poland; Evangelia Kranioti, Greece; Sjoerd Knibbeler, Netherlands; David Magnusson, Sweden; Filippo Patrese, Italy; Thomas Rousset, France; Polly Tootal, United Kingdom; and Oezden Yorulmaz, Germany. The shortlisted photographers’ work will go on show at the Villa Noailles in Hyeres from 23 April – 24 May, and will be invited to present their work to the jury in person at portfolio reviews during the festival weekend, 23-27 April. The festival …

2015-04-28T10:07:16+00:00

BJP Staff