All posts filed under: Fine Art

BJP #7860: Ones to Watch

Our latest issue, Ones to Watch, is available to buy now from The BJP Shop. Find it in the App Store from 2 May and in shops from 3 May. Since 2011, we’ve dedicated an issue of BJP to identifying the best emerging talent in the photographic world – the image-makers poised for international success and set to loom large in the industry for years to come. In our annual Talent Issues, we’ve featured over 100 photographers who have gone on to firmly establish themselves in their respective fields, shining a spotlight on the work of photographers such as Diana Markosian, Max Pinckers and Mariela Sancari. This year, a global panel of 115 experts – including Erik Kessels, Olivier Laurent, Zelda Cheatle, Poulomi Basu and more – to nominate photographers they think represent the future of photography. The panel – made up of editors, curators, educators, gallery owners, festival directors, writers and photographers – have all weighed in and represent the full spectrum of the photographic community. We present the photographers set to make noise in 2017:    “The sixth edition …

2017-05-09T12:54:27+00:00

Festivals: Alberto Garcia-Alix curates PHotoEspaña 2017

“Anders Petersen, Pierre Molinier, Antoine d’Agata, Teresa Margolles, Karlheinz Weinberger, Paulo Nozolino, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin produce a work outside of orthodoxies where emotion is everything,” states Alberto Garcia-Alix. “They take their great strength from their capacity for transmission and empathy. “Like a spark. An intense current of excitement. We convulse. We fill ourselves with resonances. The comprehension of the universe as the last act. That is the great subliminal power that art has. The exaltation of the being.” The Spanish photographer, known for his raw portraiture and involvement with the hedonistic post-Franco La Movida Madrilene, has been given free reign to curate PHotoEspaña’s 20th edition, and has taken a radical approach. Celebrating “work that lives outside the norms because it feeds off what is most intimate and passionate in the author”, he’s selected cult and obsessive projects, many of which have an element of sexual subversion. He finds “exaltation takes flesh as a catapult for the senses” in d’Agata’s scenes of sexual encounter for example, and “fierce hedonism and independence” in Molinier’s fantastic and fetishistic …

2017-04-27T14:36:55+00:00

Awards: Salvatore Vitale wins the PHM 2017 Grant

“Salvatore Vitale’s extraordinary project How to secure a country is a forensic examination of national security in one of the safest countries on the planet. This work challenges the concept of power and control, shining a light on wider issues of mass migration and fear,” says Emma Bowkett, director of photography for the FT Weekend Magazine and a jury member for the PH Museum 2017 Grant this year. Along with Sarah Leen from National Geographic, Ihiro Hayami from Tokyo Photography Festival, and the photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg, she picked out the Italian photographer for the top prize, for his project exploring the National Security Program in Switzerland, his adopted home. Two years in the making, the series has been funded by a Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia grant, and Vitale has scooped £7000 by winning the PH Museum prize. “Salvatore Vitale has managed to gain access to one of the most difficult places to photograph; border control,” comments Hayami. “He tries to capture, or examine, the abstract concept of security through the fragments of scenes and successfully presents, …

2017-04-27T15:01:55+00:00

Photofestivals: Kyotographie opens in Japan

Japanese photographers are well-known in the West – if they’re from the 1960s Provoke movement. Contemporary photographers have won much less publicity but, the home of some of the world’s most advanced camera and printing technology, Japan has fostered a wealth of new talent in recent years, including BJP cover star Daisuke Yokota. The city of Kyoto has evolved into a new creative hub in Japan over the last decade, bringing with it events such as the international photography festival Kyotographie, co-directed and co-founded by husband and wife team Yusuke Nakanishi, a lighting director, and photographer Lucille Reyboz. It’s just opened for its fifth edition, which is themed Love and features 16 exhibitions in 16 carefully-selected venues, bridging the gap between Japanese and Western photography networks, and also championing new talent. For those who can’t visit, here are BJP‘s highlights. Toiletpaper at the Asphodel Catapulting you into a world of crimson furry carpets, disco ball lighting and bath soap sofas, Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari have transformed the three-storey Asphodel building into an outlandish universe of …

2017-05-02T17:36:36+00:00

Endia Beal’s Am I What You’re Looking For?

“At Yale University, I found myself in a place of ‘double consciousness’,” recalls Endia Beal, citing the writer, sociologist and activist WEB Du Bois. Beal was the only black person in the 2013 cohort for the fine arts MA in photography, and also in her workplace – an IT department. “I grew up in one culture and now inhabited another, becoming a mediator between these two worlds,” she says. Upon learning that her hair, a red Afro, fascinated her colleagues, she turned the tables on them, allowing them to feel it but recording their impressions. “It felt like I was doing something I wasn’t supposed to be doing but wanted to do,” admits one of them, while others spoke of the moment being “uncomfortable”, “voyeuristic” or “awkward”, highlighting the inappropriateness of the question, “Can I touch your hair?” Beal’s work since has continued to question and provoke, often challenging the uniformity of corporate culture. In an amusing but no less incisive series, she styled seven white women in their forties with ‘black’ hairdos, then took head …

2017-04-19T16:12:34+00:00

Q&A: Paul Hutchinson on shooting b-boys, butterflies and U-Bahnhofs

Born in 1987 in Berlin, Paul Hutchinson graduated from the University of the Arts, Berlin in 2012, and from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London in 2014. While in London he assisted Wolfgang Tillmans, and by 2015 he had published his first book – B-Boys, Fly Girls and Horticulture. He has gone on to publish two more, Wildlife Photography in 2016 and Schmetterlinge [Butterflies] in 2017. Hutchinson has won various awards and grants, and has shown his work at Galerie Mansart, the Berlinische Galerie Museum of Modern Art and The Photographers Gallery. The recent exhibition Perfect Storm, at the NRW Forum in Dusseldorf, included Hutchinson’s photographs alongside work by other fast-emerging image-makers such as Thomas Albdorf, Andrey Bogush, Vendula Knopova, Maurice van Es and Nikolas Ventourakis. BJP: You were a bit of a tearaway at school, how did you get into photography? Paul Hutchinson: I was never a typical troublemaker or bully, it was always about curiosity and trying things off the beaten track, which obviously hit some borders in the context …

2017-04-20T15:12:08+00:00

Festival: Look Photo opens in Liverpool this weekend

Liverpool – home of The Beatles, a passion for football and the unforgettable Scouse accent; Hong Kong – one of the world’s key financial centres, towering skyline, exotic cuisine and ongoing violations of human rights. It might seem unlikely, but there are parallels to be drawn. Both are historically part of the British Empire and both brazen a rich maritime past with large trading ports still used today – perhaps one reason why the northwest England metropolitan borough is home to the oldest Chinatown in Europe and some 10,000 Chinese residents. It comes as no surprise, then, that Liverpool’s biennial International Photography Festival, curated by Hong Kong-based Ying Kwok, hones in on this complex, age-old relationship for its upcoming edition – which opens on 07 April. Sarah Fisher, the executive director of the Open Eye Gallery, the central venue for a number of specially-commissioned exhibitions at the festival, explains that today’s 10,000 residents are a fusion of two communities – the second and third generation Cantonese speakers from Hong Kong, “whose parents established Chinatown”, and those …

2017-04-06T14:22:35+00:00

The V&A announces a new Photography Centre in London

Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new centre will open in Autumn 2018 and more than double the V&A’s current photography exhibition space. The opening will be accompanied by a museum-wide photography festival, a new digital resource, and a new history of photography course run with the Royal College of Art. The V&A plans to run events and activities in the new centre, and will continue to expand the facility. Phase Two will see the museum add more gallery space, and create a teaching and research facility, a browsing library, and a studio and darkroom which will enable photographers’ residencies. The new centre comes as the V&A transfers the Royal Photographic Society’s collection from the Science Museum Group, which was formerly held in the National Media Museum in Bradford. The transfer adds over 270,000 photographs, 26,000 publications, and 6000 pieces of equipment to the V&A’s holdings – which was already one of the largest and most important in the world, including around 500,000 works collected since the foundation of the museum in 1852. The RPS collection includes …

2017-05-09T12:52:35+00:00

Photobook: Metropolight by David Gaberle

Five years ago David Gaberle went through “a really rough time” after moving to London. A friend suggested he pick up a camera to help process his experience, and he found that photography “really eases the experience of the sensory overload that comes with living in a big city”. By 2015 he was ready to embark on an ambitious new project inspired by this work, and invested all his savings in travelling to the world’s biggest cities to shoot them. On the move for eight months and changing location every few weeks, he covered over 3600km. “The constant search was the happiest time of my life,” he says. Originally from the Czech Republic, Gaberle studied anthropology back home and has a researcher’s perspective on the modern metropolis. “In the big cities, people spend less time with other people which means they have more time to become different, developing themselves,” he says. “There are more interesting personalities in the cities.” At the same time, though, he finds big cities can be “really dehumanising”, because “they have an effect on how …

2017-05-25T10:46:44+00:00

On show: Nico Krijno’s The Fluid Right Edge

Known for working with brightly-coloured, very obviously retouched still life images, it’s easy to identify Nico Krijno with the new wave of work spearheaded by Lucas Blalock and Sam Falls. He agrees with a non-committal “I guess” but says that, based out on a farm near Cape Town and brought up in a small town by the Boschberg Mountains, he’s more used to doing his own thing. “It’s like totally isolated out there!” he tells me in Beetles + Huxley Gallery, the smart Mayfair space currently showing his work. “There aren’t the institutions, there are no bookshops, zero. I’m here to soak up some culture. “But I think if you’re isolated, you’re not exposed to everything that’s going on in London, you have to go inward,” he adds. “And that’s important.” Born in South Africa in 1981, Krijno never studied photography. Interested in writing and plays he studied theatre and film-making in Cape Town, before deciding his ideas were getting lost in “the hierarchy of all the people” on set and swapping onto stills. He …

2017-05-09T12:36:29+00:00

BJP Staff