All posts filed under: Photojournalism

A family stands on what is left of their home. Kobani/Kobane (Arabic: Ayn al Arab), Syria. 06 August 2015 © Lorenzo Meloni/Magnum Photos

Amnesty International and Magnum Photos bid I Welcome to refugees

“Photography can be a powerful way of telling a story and these photos remind us that people have been fleeing conflict and persecution throughout history,” says Tom Davies, campaign manager at Amnesty International UK. “We’re trying to engage with the public – and ultimately decision-makers – to show that forced migration is not new, [and that] how we respond is up to us.” He’s talking about the I Welcome show, a joint initiative between Amnesty International and Magnum Photos open on London’s South Bank from 07-18 December. Featuring work by nearly 20 Magnum photographers, including Moises Saman, Philip Jones Griffiths, Thomas Dworzak and David “Chim” Seymour, it presents the depressing but inescapable truth that refugees have long existed, and in doing so provides a wider context for the current, ongoing crisis. “We felt that linking up with Magnum was a good way of showing that historical context,” explains Davies. “We were aware that it was Magnum’s 70th anniversary in 2017, and that they had an amazing back-catalogue of incredible photography, so we felt that in …

2016-12-02T12:42:10+00:00

Yann Gross, The Turtle Cap, 2012, from The Jungle Book (Aperture, 2016)

After lunch, a kid plays with a turtle shell, Bolívar Community, Peru. Turtle is one of the favorite meals in the Amazon.

Paradise Lost: Defetishising perspectives of the Amazon

A traditional prophecy said that some day a giant snake would come and swallow up the Suruí people, destroying them and everything else in its path. The snake arrived in 1969. It’s called the Trans-Amazonian highway. In the wake of its completion, missionaries rushed in to evangelise the Suruí people, who are native to the Amazon rainforest. This act of faith profoundly changed indigenous beliefs because the missionaries encouraged the shamans to abandon their ancestral rituals. Perpera Suruí was the wawã, or shaman, of the community of Lapetanha. He is now the gatekeeper for the Evangelical church in the village and has given up his shamanic practice. The Suruí’s story is just one of many that alludes to the rapid acculturation faced by indigenous communities since the days of colonialism. A witness to evangelisation campaigns, infrastructure development, abuses of the rubber trade and natural resource extraction, the world’s longest river continues to arouse greed, competition and fascination in its visitors. Following in the footsteps of past expeditions, The Jungle Book: Contemporary Stories of the Amazon and Its Fringe is a visual …

2016-11-24T16:10:29+00:00

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Sebastião Salgado’s Kuwait: A Desert on Fire Gets Limited Edition Release

In January and February 1991, as the United States–led coalition drove Iraqi forces out of Kuwait, Saddam Hussein’s troops retaliated with an inferno. As the desperate efforts to contain and extinguish the conflagration progressed, Sebastião Salgado traveled to Kuwait to witness the crisis firsthand.

2016-11-11T13:35:16+00:00

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Photographing Masonic Community in South Wales

In his latest exhibition, David Barnes explores community and social identity in South Wales – a topic that has fascinated him for 20 years. Taking its title from a quote by cultural critic and historian Raymond Williams, Barnes’s In Solution is the culmination of four years’ work made with the support of Ffotogallery. Barnes, who grew up in South Wales, immersed himself within the small, tight-knit communities in the Valleys and neighbouring border regions, observing and recording everyday life and rejecting the romanticised vision associated with the region. “The whole idea of Wales as depicted in How Green Was My Valley? and all these things is a myth,” he says. “The things I want to look at aren’t being looked at, or aren’t very fashionable to look at. When I go into places like Tesco or Halfords, I see a community of individuals. Modern Welsh culture is not this homogeneous idea of people standing on the hills singing and drinking pints of warm bitter. The real experience includes places such as retail parks as sites …

2016-11-03T13:10:39+00:00

Aly Gadiaga, Catania, Sicily, Italy, June 2015. Aly, 26, left Senegal and spent three years travelling to Libya, washing dishes in Mali and Burkina Faso in order to earn the money to board one of the dangerous convoys and cross the Sahara. Aly speaks Wolof (a language of Senegal), French, Italian and English fluently. He has lived in Catania for two years and has not yet received a work permit. Everyone in the market knows him as “Gucci”, a slang term for “good” or “all right”, because of his remarkably positive attitude. He has not seen his family for six years.
Images © John Radcliffe Studio.

Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016

On 13 and 19 April last year, two migrant boats capsized off the coast of Libya, with the loss of more than a thousand lives. Many of those who drowned were refugees, fleeing civil war, and therefore protected under the 1951 Refugee Convention, but their deaths won little sympathy on the pages of some of the UK’s biggest newspapers. On 17 April, The Sun columnist Katie Hopkins wrote an article comparing migrants to cockroaches or the norovirus, adding that Britain needed gunships, not rescue boats, to send them back. “No, I don’t care,” she wrote. “Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show me skinny people looking sad. I still don’t care.” As the so-called migrant crisis continued unabated, so too did the negative press. By July, the Daily Mail, Britain’s most-read newspaper brand and Hopkins’ new employer, was running headlines like “The ‘swarm’ on our streets”, calling for the army to go to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. A year later, the Daily Express warned of …

2016-10-20T12:14:51+00:00

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The negative sublime of Edward Burtynsky’s corrupted landscapes

The Little Rann of Kutch is located in the Thar desert, a seasonal salt marsh in the Indian state of Gujarat. Salt is the main industry in the region. Every year for eight months, it is home to more than 100,000 Agariya workers who fan out over the delta and toil in the brutal sun to extract around one million tonnes of salt a year from the floodwaters of the nearby Arabian Sea. Like so much in the world today, the future of the Agariya people hangs in the balance. With a future currently under threat from receding groundwater levels and declining market values, the salt pans are likely to disappear without trace, along with a traditional way of life that has been sustained for the past four hundred years. Burtynsky’s latest series Salt Pans combines fine art and advocacy through his acclaimed aerial perspective to tackle the evidential environmental imprint imposed by the harsh processes of salt industry on the Agariya people and their land. Through their documentation of a disappearing landscape, the photographs are …

2016-10-13T13:19:15+00:00

BJP Staff