All posts filed under: Photojournalism

Border Towns: Living with the Cartel

Alex Webb, an active member of the international photographic cooperative Magnum, published his border photography in the 2003 book Crossings: Photographs from the U.S.-Mexico Border. Webb, a regular contributor to the New York Times, Life and National Geographic, first visited the border in 1975, long before the drug-related violence that has erupted in the past decade. “On that first trip I became interested by the notion of the border as a kind of third country, neither the United States nor Mexico, a place with its own rules, its own traditions,” he tells BJP. Last year, Webb’s photography came to the attention of Academy-nominated cinematographer Roger Deakins, who claimed it was a key inspiration to shooting Sicario, the unflinching feature film from 2015, set amongst the Mexican drug cartels, and starring Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro. Although initially shooting in black and white, it was Webb’s saturated colour photography that caught Deakins’ eye.   Subscribe to the British Journal of Photography for the best stories in contemporary photography delivered to your door every month.

2016-02-10T17:55:09+00:00

Map of Displacement: Iraqi Exiles Tell Their Own Story

To Western eyes, Iraq is a nightmarish hurricane of blood, bullets and bombs. We see it through the lens of a news media that still uses the motto “if it bleeds, it leads”. Editors salivate at shots of mutilated corpses, masked men committing horrific acts of violence and apocalyptic threats about the end of civilisation. Yet amidst this carnage there’s a story going untold, one that could have broader consequences on the world than these acts of violence. It’s a tale of mass population displacement, of how conflict percolates into everyday life, of the consequences and reverberations beyond the news headlines. Map of Displacement showcases collaborative photographic projects between the Kurdish Iraqi photographers of Metrography, Iraq’s first internal photography agency, and international journalists. The website covers topics as disparate as a Christian and Sunni family learning to coexist under the same roof; barbers threatened with having their fingers cut off if they keep cutting hair in Western styles; and Yazidi women kidnapped and sold into sexual slavery. “In Iraq, the ISIS crisis doesn’t only mean death and destruction, …

2016-02-10T17:15:03+00:00

Amnesty photographer Leila Alaoui killed in Burkina Faso al-Qaeda attack

Leila Alaoui, the 33-year-old French-Moroccan photographer, died last night as a result of injuries sustained during Friday’s al-Qaeda terrorist attack in Burkina Faso, along with her driver, Mahamadi Ouédraogo, a father of four. Alaoui was working on assignment on women’s rights issues for Amnesty International. The human rights organisation and French culture and communications minister Fleur Pellerin both confirmed her death this morning. Talking to BJP this morning, Yves Traore, Director of Amnesty International Burkina Faso, paid tribute to them both. “Leila was an extraordinary young woman,” Traore said of Alaoui. “We wanted to work with her because of her talent, and her passion for helping women, girls and marginalised people tell their own stories and claim their rights. As a strong woman herself, she wanted to show women as authors of their own destiny, not as victims. We are all devastated by her loss.” Talking of Alaoui’s driver Mahamadi Ouédraogo, Traore said: “Mahamadi was a dedicated, helpful and caring colleague. His warm smile and discretion were a feature of the many Amnesty missions that he accompanied us on over …

2016-01-20T14:13:02+00:00

The attempt to block Parliament of Ukraine (Verhovna Rada). The police burned the Trade Union Federation of Ukraine – those still in the building were burned alive. 20th February 2014

Culture of the Confrontation: live from the Ukrainian Revolution

As winter approached in late 2013, the rumblings of political, social and civil discontent in Ukraine was growing louder by the day. When Viktor Yanukovych, the nation’s president, rejected a deal with the European Union for a $15bn aid package from Russia, many citizens were furious. Promising greater political integration and closer cultural ties, lots of Ukrainians saw the EU deal as a new path for the country, whose economic predicament was worsening.  On the 21st November, up to 20,000 protesters gathered in Kiev’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) after spreading messages on social media. By the 24th, their numbers had swelled – somewhere between 50,000 and 200,000, depending on who you asked. As pro-EU demonstrators chanted and marched, a small group attempted to storm the Government Building. That’s when the trouble really began. The wave of civil unrest flooded the streets, fuelled by a heady mix of Cold War-era hostilities, far-right opportunism and pan-European democratic idealism. What became known as Euromaidan led to the Ukrainian Revolution, with President Yanukovych being ousted from power in February …

2016-02-04T18:18:31+00:00

Barricade made from barrels, 1916

Historic photojournalism depicting the growth of Irish nationalism

“The Irish can’t forget their history because the English refuse to remember it,” says Luke Dodd, quoting renowned academic Terry Eagleton. If that’s true, it’s something Dodd hopes to change with an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery devoted to Ireland’s rebellion against British rule. The Easter Rising 1916: Sean Sexton Collection depicts the growth of Irish nationalism, the uprising of 1916, the subsequent emergence of the Irish Free State, and how it all played out in images. Dodd, who has just edited a book of Jane Brown’s photojournalism, has drawn the images from a private collection of more than 20,000 prints put together by Sexton over the last 50 years. Including press and military photographs, amateur shots and postcards, Sexton’s archive is outstanding, says Dodd, because it’s so comprehensive, but at the same time so personal. “He’s a slightly eccentric character and has searched everywhere – he’s been to every car boot sale, and voraciously collected anything Irish,” he says. “That means there’s a lot of obscure stuff, but that’s also its great strength. “There aren’t …

2016-01-12T17:34:56+00:00

April 28th, 2015. Baltimore, Maryland. Police shoot tear gas to clear the street. Protesters, media, police and national guard converged near the corner of North and Pennsylvania Avenue during protests.

Creating the new symbols of protest imagery

Protest imagery has taken on a refreshed sense of vibrancy in recent years, thanks to the rise of smartphone photography, social media and a new generation of young, politically engaged activists. But while smartphones have allowed for a wider range of representation, the rising tide of documentation has also raised all boats, including photojournalists like Natalie Keyssar who’d perhaps still be photographers in any other era. The collective appetite for dynamic photography that helps portray the raw edges of global issues has never been greater, and this sense of drama is present in Keyssar’s work, which has been seen in publications like Bloomberg Businessweek, California Sunday, The Fader and The New York Times. Newly signed by international photo agency INSTITUTE, on her website she describes herself as “primarily [focusing] on youth culture, activism, and class”, and in recent months Keyssar has focused her lens on scenes of activism and protest around the world. We caught up with her over email to ask what compels her to cover these issues.     Your recent work has …

2016-01-13T14:33:00+00:00

Screen Shot 2014-03-11 at 10.41.41

The thin blue line: Combining Russian policewomen and the criminals they capture

Social networks allow us to project whatever image we choose onto the people we’re connected to, and images – those we take of ourselves and of others – form a central role in the way we perform for others in the online space. And this sense of performance lies at the heart of a project by Russian photographer Anastasia Rudenko, which features images of policewomen and criminals she has found online. From 2011 to 2014, Rudenko, who was born in the South Kazakhstan region of the former Soviet Union, collected images sourced from Russian social networking sites, including Odnoklassniki.ru, a social network for schoolmates past and present, akin to Friends Reunited. These kind of sites are everywhere in Russia, she says, and they provide an “avalanche” of images that can make a useful starting point for her personal projects. “I collect snapshots and then decide how I can use them, either as found images or as material for my own photography. In my work, I try to analyse sections of modern Russian society from different angles. …

2015-12-16T12:22:18+00:00

At Home With Mental Illness © Yuyang Liu

Keeping the flame of photojournalism alive, the Ian Parry Scholarship exhibits winning images

Launched in 1991, the Ian Parry Scholarship is an annual photographic competition for young photographers under the age of 24 or attending a full-time photographic course. Announced in July, this year’s winner Yuyang Liu, hailing from China, submitted a portfolio of images documenting the lives of people suffering with mental illness from Guangdong Province. Hosam Katan (Syria) was highly commended for his work, and Hashem Shakeri (Iran), Isadora Kosofsky (USA) and Salahuddin Ahmed (Bangladesh). An exhibition of this year’s winning and commended work, curated by Rebecca McClelland, is being exhibited this month at London’s Hoxton Gallery. The award was launched in 1991 in honour of Ian Parry, a 24-year-old photojournalist who was tragically killed whilst on assignment for The Sunday Times in December 1989 in Romania. The Scholarship comes with a £3500 grant for the production of a documentary body of work. The winner also receives a choice of equipment from Canon, has their work published in The Sunday Times Magazine, is automatically added to the final list of nominees for the Joop Swart Masterclass …

2015-12-02T17:04:09+00:00

Masterclass LATAM

World Press Photo announces the inaugural Masterclass Latin America

World Press Photo’s annual Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam annually, has been running for over 20 years, selecting photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world and offering expertise and support. Last year’s intake included Bego Antón, Raphaela Rosella and Sarker Protick (featured in our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014). In an effort to cast a wider, more diverse net, the World Press Photo Foundation is implementing a new series of regional masterclasses to develop global talent. The first regional event is the World Press Photo Masterclass Latin America, run in conjunction with the Fundación Pedro Meyer, the organisation dedicated to “the reflection, interpretation and investigation of the image and the new media”. It will be held in Mexico City between the 7th and the 11th of December 2015. The 12 photographers joining Masterclass Latin America have been announced; made up of seven men and five women of nine nationalities: Alejandro Kirchuk, Argentina; Dominic Bracco II, USA, based in Mexico; Emilia Lloret, Ecuador; Felipe Dana, Brazil; Jasmine Bakalarz, Argentina; Jonas Wresch, Germany, …

2015-11-17T17:08:13+00:00

magnum pp

BJP & Magnum Photos: Professional Practice Workshops 2016

BJP

Led by leading Magnum photographers and industry professionals, the programme presents incredible training opportunities for early & mid-career photographers. Each workshop is a two-day photographic masterclass that focuses on demystifying the business of the industry, establishing a professional network of industry contacts, understanding the requirements of the market and identifying entry realistic routes into employment. The first day focuses on lectures from key speakers on specific areas of the photographic industry, giving behind the scenes tips and practical advice explaining how to work and succeed in their area of expertise. A second day of portfolio reviews lead by industry specialists will provide photographers with an honest, constructive and critique of existing work. Workshops will be held at the Magnum Print Room in east London. Each workshop is open to 40 applicants on a first come first served basis. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Editorial photography How to succeed in the editorial market Sat 6 & Sun 7 February 2016 Photography and the art market How to get an exhibition and sell your work Sat 12 & Sun 13 …

2015-11-17T13:09:22+00:00

BJP Staff