All posts filed under: Photojournalism

Masterclass LATAM

World Press Photo announces the inaugural Masterclass Latin America

World Press Photo’s annual Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam annually, has been running for over 20 years, selecting photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world and offering expertise and support. Last year’s intake included Bego Antón, Raphaela Rosella and Sarker Protick (featured in our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014). In an effort to cast a wider, more diverse net, the World Press Photo Foundation is implementing a new series of regional masterclasses to develop global talent. The first regional event is the World Press Photo Masterclass Latin America, run in conjunction with the Fundación Pedro Meyer, the organisation dedicated to “the reflection, interpretation and investigation of the image and the new media”. It will be held in Mexico City between the 7th and the 11th of December 2015. The 12 photographers joining Masterclass Latin America have been announced; made up of seven men and five women of nine nationalities: Alejandro Kirchuk, Argentina; Dominic Bracco II, USA, based in Mexico; Emilia Lloret, Ecuador; Felipe Dana, Brazil; Jasmine Bakalarz, Argentina; Jonas Wresch, Germany, …


magnum pp

BJP & Magnum Photos: Professional Practice Workshops 2016


Led by leading Magnum photographers and industry professionals, the programme presents incredible training opportunities for early & mid-career photographers. Each workshop is a two-day photographic masterclass that focuses on demystifying the business of the industry, establishing a professional network of industry contacts, understanding the requirements of the market and identifying entry realistic routes into employment. The first day focuses on lectures from key speakers on specific areas of the photographic industry, giving behind the scenes tips and practical advice explaining how to work and succeed in their area of expertise. A second day of portfolio reviews lead by industry specialists will provide photographers with an honest, constructive and critique of existing work. Workshops will be held at the Magnum Print Room in east London. Each workshop is open to 40 applicants on a first come first served basis. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Editorial photography How to succeed in the editorial market Sat 6 & Sun 7 February 2016 Photography and the art market How to get an exhibition and sell your work Sat 12 & Sun 13 …


© Rafael Graf

EyeEm and VII Photo team up for Untold Stories

Founded five years ago, EyeEm has gone through several iterations – at once an online photographic community, a social network and a magazine. Their most recent and successful business model has been as a marketplace for imagery, giving photographers the chance to sell their images via agencies like Getty Images. While the Berlin company is clearly more aligned with the tech industry’s Silicon Valley DNA, they’ve been making in-roads with serious photographers. They recently held their first EyeEm festival in Germany, receiving 100,000 entries. Now, they’ve teamed up with VII Photo Agency to find the best emerging talent on their platform under the banner of Untold Stories. “It came from several discussions I had with Ed Kashi and Ron Haviv,” explains Severin Matusek, Vice President of Community at EyeEm. He was impressed with VII’s sought-after mentorship scheme which has ran since 2008, connecting young photojournalists with an experienced VII photographer for two years and gain the benefit of their knowledge and experience. “I wanted to do something similar with EyeEm, but with amateur shooters. Most people …


Camopi, February 2015 © Christophe Gin for the Carmignac Foundation

Christophe Gin wins 6th edition of the Carmignac Foundation’s Photojournalism Award

Christophe Gin has been awarded the 6th edition of the Carmignac Foundation’s Photojournalism Award, winning a €50,000 grant for Colonie, his work ruminating on lawless areas in France. Created in 2009, the award has sponsored photojournalism in conflict zones and neglected regions; previous winners include Robin Hammond (featured in our latest Portrait issue) and recent Magnum Photos nominee Newsha Tavakolian. The award was mired in controversy last year, after Tavakolian contended that the foundation’s benefactor, French investment banker Edouard Carmignac began to interfere with with the presentation of her work to an “unacceptable” degree. The foundation disputed her remarks, claiming the postponing of her project was due to purported threats to the photographer’s safety, which it said Tavakolian reported. It would seem any acrimony has abated, however – Tavakolian’s work will be part of the Carmignac Foundation’s upcoming retrospective at Saatchi Gallery, London. It features 40 works produced since the award’s inception by all laureates – Kai Wiedenhöfer, Massimo Berruti, Robin Hammond, David Monteleone, Tavakolian and this year’s winner Christophe Gin. Colonie, Gin’s winning project delved into French Guiana, a region in …


James Ellroy finds real crime-scene photographs from LAPD in 1953

Shortly before I’m due to conduct a long-distance telephone interview from Manchester to the Los Angeles Police Museum, with the self-proclaimed Demon Dog of crime fiction James Ellroy and his temporary collaborator Glynn Martin (executive director of the museum), I open an email from a mate with an attachment to Werner Herzog’s 5 Favourite Films. Above the list there is a quote from Herzog himself that stands out like a bruise on a child: “I believe the common denominator of the universe is not harmony, but chaos, hostility and murder.” I make an instant note of it, but my 30 minutes are up before I can ask Ellroy if this is how he sees the universe. I’m guessing it is: his body – or his cadaver – of work is the written equivalent of a dumping ground. Murder – including the unsolved murder of his own mother in 1958 – corruption, tortured cops, bent authorities, flawed femme fatales: these are his obsessions (he is a chronic obsessive on and off the page). But then Ellroy …


USA. Teviston, California. 2001. Boy with an old farm truck.

Matt Black’s ‘moral’ photography of America’s sprawling poverty

“It’s a very simple idea: to say no, this is not isolated, it’s literally everywhere and it’s something we all need to address squarely,” says Matt Black.  For newly appointed Magnum nominee Black, photography is as much an exercise in morality as it is one in aesthetics and artistry. That high-minded idea has been put, steadily and consistently into practice, evidenced by the two decades he’s spent exploring the rural United States, meeting communities that have been excluded and neglected. His work caught the attention of Magnum Photos, who named him as a Magnum Nominee this year alongside Carolyn Drake, Lorenzo Meloni, Richard Mosse, Max Pinckers and Newsha Tavakolian (featured in our September 2015 issue.) Black’s current ongoing project, The Geography of Poverty, is perhaps his deepest foray into these strongly-felt concerns. He’s travelling across the United States photographing communities with poverty rates of over 20 per cent, the official level for a ‘poverty area’. There are over 70 towns that meet the ’20 per cent’ standard and this in itself, Black finds appalling: “I …


Burma, 2012

The journalist-turned-photographer shining a light on Beijing’s underground workers

Having discovered a passion for photography as a teen, Sim Chi Yin spent nine years as an adult writing for The Straits Times, Singapore’s English daily, before returning to image making. “I’ve had to remind myself that a good text subject might not be a strong picture project,” she says of the change. “And I’ve had to deal with switching from trying to be an objective reporter to being a closely involved fly on the wall.” She seems to be making a smooth transition, though – Rat Tribe, which documents the lives of low-income workers in Beijing, was presented at Rencontres d’Arles in 2012, and her coverage of the Burmese spring was shown at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo the same year. In 2013, she was nominated for the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography for Dying to Breathe, an ongoing series on a Chinese gold miner and she is also a member of VII Photo Agency, having been part of their mentoring programme. Born in Singapore, Sim is now based in China, where taking photographs – or, …


Every year workers in the largest public cemetery in Guatemala exhume the bodies of some 4,000 infants to deposit in a mass grave, which borders the main garbage dump in the capital city. Cemetery rules state that six years after a burial, relatives must pay 180 Quetzales, around US$24 dollars, to renew the burial plot for another four years. If there is no payment, cemetery workers exhume the bodies of the young children and put the skeleton in a mass grave. Almost none of the relatives pay the fees and over 4,000 bodies are exhumed annually.

The cemetery in Guatemala that exhumes babies’ graves

When a child dies, some parents quell their pain with the belief that their child is among the angels. Others find comfort in knowing their child is at rest. They know there is a place where, in moments of quiet despair, they can drop to their knees and grieve the absence of their little body to hold. So when photojournalist Saul Martinez learned that, in his home country of Guatemala, deceased children were being exhumed from their places of rest and being disposed of in a public burial pit, it struck him as inconceivable. “I set out to find this cemetery that I had heard about. It was somewhat difficult to get access to it; the workers didn’t really want to let me see much at first. “I was so shocked when I saw the remains of children being pulled out, not only because of the fact that babies were being exhumed but because a job like this actually exists.” And so began Forgotten Children, Guatemala City, a documentary short and series of images that …


The changing landscapes of the modern American cowboy

“This is the last cowboy song, the end of a hundred year waltz. Voices sound sad as they’re singing along another piece of America’s lost.” So goes the chorus of Ed Bruce ballad The Last Cowboy, which was released in May 1980. But although their numbers have been dwindling for years, cowboys so still exist, roaming the plains and valleys of the American West as they have done since the late 19th century. They have had to adapt to 21st century life, though, and where the song has them supplementing their wages “in a market on weekends selling tobacco and beer’, it is now resources, from copper to gold, oil, natural gas and even wind and solar energy, which is competing with their herding and farming activities. Lucas Foglia approaches this knotty issue by surveying the subtleties of an American icon. He travelled throughout rural Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Wyoming between 2006 and 2013, visiting some of the least-populated regions in the United States and finding places in which “the landscape felt …


A women takes a selfie picture with Royal Thai Army soldiers stationed at the Ratchaprasong intersection, as martial law is imposed, in Bangkok, Thailand, on Tuesday, May 20, 2014.

How modern protests are harnessing the power of photography

“If you’re angry, throw your arms up,” said Reverend Al Sharpton. “If you want justice, throw your arms up. Because that’s the sign Michael was using. He had a surrender sign. That’s the sign you have to deal with. Use the sign he last showed. We want answers why that last sign was not respected.” Sharpton was speaking in August, 2014, year in Ferguson, the poverty-stricken suburb of St Louis, Missouri. Sharpton had travelled to speak in the wake of the death of the black teenager Michael Brown who – it has been claimed – was shot by a policeman while his hands were extended above his head, palms open. The #HandsUpDontShoot campaign went viral. A month later, in Hong Kong, the ‘umbrella movement’ began. Thousands of people, mostly millennials, occupied the intersection outside the Hong Kong government. At the urging of Hong Kong’s local Occupy movement, the protests spread, blocking the city’s main thoroughfares. The protest was specific, opposing a proposed election reform that would extend Beijing’s control over the former colonial province. But …


BJP Staff