All posts filed under: Photojournalism

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Sebastião Salgado’s Kuwait: A Desert on Fire Gets Limited Edition Release

In January and February 1991, as the United States–led coalition drove Iraqi forces out of Kuwait, Saddam Hussein’s troops retaliated with an inferno. As the desperate efforts to contain and extinguish the conflagration progressed, Sebastião Salgado traveled to Kuwait to witness the crisis firsthand.

2016-11-11T13:35:16+00:00

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Photographing Masonic Community in South Wales

In his latest exhibition, David Barnes explores community and social identity in South Wales – a topic that has fascinated him for 20 years. Taking its title from a quote by cultural critic and historian Raymond Williams, Barnes’s In Solution is the culmination of four years’ work made with the support of Ffotogallery. Barnes, who grew up in South Wales, immersed himself within the small, tight-knit communities in the Valleys and neighbouring border regions, observing and recording everyday life and rejecting the romanticised vision associated with the region. “The whole idea of Wales as depicted in How Green Was My Valley? and all these things is a myth,” he says. “The things I want to look at aren’t being looked at, or aren’t very fashionable to look at. When I go into places like Tesco or Halfords, I see a community of individuals. Modern Welsh culture is not this homogeneous idea of people standing on the hills singing and drinking pints of warm bitter. The real experience includes places such as retail parks as sites …

2016-11-03T13:10:39+00:00

Aly Gadiaga, Catania, Sicily, Italy, June 2015. Aly, 26, left Senegal and spent three years travelling to Libya, washing dishes in Mali and Burkina Faso in order to earn the money to board one of the dangerous convoys and cross the Sahara. Aly speaks Wolof (a language of Senegal), French, Italian and English fluently. He has lived in Catania for two years and has not yet received a work permit. Everyone in the market knows him as “Gucci”, a slang term for “good” or “all right”, because of his remarkably positive attitude. He has not seen his family for six years.
Images © John Radcliffe Studio.

Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016

On 13 and 19 April last year, two migrant boats capsized off the coast of Libya, with the loss of more than a thousand lives. Many of those who drowned were refugees, fleeing civil war, and therefore protected under the 1951 Refugee Convention, but their deaths won little sympathy on the pages of some of the UK’s biggest newspapers. On 17 April, The Sun columnist Katie Hopkins wrote an article comparing migrants to cockroaches or the norovirus, adding that Britain needed gunships, not rescue boats, to send them back. “No, I don’t care,” she wrote. “Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show me skinny people looking sad. I still don’t care.” As the so-called migrant crisis continued unabated, so too did the negative press. By July, the Daily Mail, Britain’s most-read newspaper brand and Hopkins’ new employer, was running headlines like “The ‘swarm’ on our streets”, calling for the army to go to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. A year later, the Daily Express warned of …

2016-10-20T12:14:51+00:00

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The negative sublime of Edward Burtynsky’s corrupted landscapes

The Little Rann of Kutch is located in the Thar desert, a seasonal salt marsh in the Indian state of Gujarat. Salt is the main industry in the region. Every year for eight months, it is home to more than 100,000 Agariya workers who fan out over the delta and toil in the brutal sun to extract around one million tonnes of salt a year from the floodwaters of the nearby Arabian Sea. Like so much in the world today, the future of the Agariya people hangs in the balance. With a future currently under threat from receding groundwater levels and declining market values, the salt pans are likely to disappear without trace, along with a traditional way of life that has been sustained for the past four hundred years. Burtynsky’s latest series Salt Pans combines fine art and advocacy through his acclaimed aerial perspective to tackle the evidential environmental imprint imposed by the harsh processes of salt industry on the Agariya people and their land. Through their documentation of a disappearing landscape, the photographs are …

2016-10-13T13:19:15+00:00

Mahbooba stands against bullet-ridden wall

Photojournalist Paula Bronstein on the Afghanistan stories that don’t go away

“Let me try to explain you something,” says renowned American photojournalist Paula Bronstein. “Afghans are strong, they’re resilient. They can deal with a lot. Anybody who I know who is a fixer, translator, photographer – everyone has lost friends or relatives. Children walk around in the middle of winter in these cheap, Chinese plastic shoes without socks, when there’s snow on the ground. It’s how they grow up. They’re strong because they have to be, not because they want to be.” Born in Boston, Paula Bronstein specialised in photojournalism at the Rochester Institute of Technology before developing her career working for various newspapers in the States. She moved to Thailand in 1998, and in 2001, she was sent on her first assignment to Afghanistan. Over the years she has come to play a pivotal role in capturing some of the most striking images and stories of impoverished communities from the war-torn region. “I was captivated by the place,” she says. “It became kind of my beat, so to speak.” Some 15 years later, Bronstein has …

2016-08-18T11:03:02+00:00

Palermo, South Italy, 20 September 2015. Yannick, from the Ivory Coast, on the rooftop of the church of Falsomiele, a rough area in the suburbs of Palermo. Caritas housed him and other asylum seekers within the parish premises.

Undressing the Refugee Crisis with Sara Furlanetto

Let Me Tell You Who I Am, a new photography series documenting the movement of refugees across Europe, started in the spring of 2015, it is the result of almost a year of research across the continent, revealing, in a collection of portraits, the people behind the greatest movement of humanity since the Second World War.

2016-07-29T17:25:51+00:00

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Interview: Clément Saccomani, New Head of NOOR

BJP

In 2007, when many prominent voices were lamenting the death of photojournalism, nine award-winning photographers came together to form NOOR. Launched at Visa pour l’image in Perpignan, NOOR – which means ‘light’ in Arabic – was one of the first agencies to be born in the digital era, allowing its members to respond from the get-go. These photographers are at its core because, like other cooperative agencies such as Magnum and VII Photo, NOOR is owned and operated by its members. These currently include founders Stanley Greene, Pep Bonet, Yuri Kozyrev, Kadir van Lohuizen and Francesco Zizola, who were later joined by Jon Lowenstein, Nina Berman, Andrea Bruce, Alixandra Fazzina, Bénédicte Kurzen – and most recently Sebastián Liste and Asim Rafiqui, all of whom pay a monthly fee and have a financial stake in the NOOR agency and foundation. They’re an international bunch, and they have diverse visions, but share a commitment to producing independent visual reports on challenging global issues. Their main goal in starting the agency was to pool their resources, allowing them …

2016-05-10T13:29:49+00:00

A campesino in Bajo Aguan, where local farm workers are waging a war against big African Palm companies.

Dominic Bracco, the Tim Hetherington Trust Visionary Award winner: “I saw people I love do horrific things”

“I’m just a straight up, ‘shit-kicker’ kid from Texas,” says Dominic Bracco. “I wore cowboy boots every day of my life until I was 20. I was that kid.” Bracco, 29, a photojournalist now based in Mexico City, knew that he wanted to pursue photography from a young age. He grew up in Chapman Ranch, near to the Mexican border. As he neared adulthood, he became acutely aware of the deep-rooted issues of migration, drugs and cultural divides of the region. His mother was a children’s social worker; his great uncle, a human trafficker. When he was still a teenager, he was inspired by  photography series that documented the lives of two lovers addicted to drugs. Yet, even then, Bracco was already tapping into a humanistic perception of documentary photography that would come to define his style and approach. “What resonated with me was that it wasn’t just about them being heroin addicts,” says Bracco of the lovers. “It was about them and how much they loved each other. Drugs have a very charged feel next to the border. …

2016-05-05T22:46:48+00:00

BJP Staff