All posts filed under: Portrait

Audry Hepburn, 1956 by Yousuf Karsh

Yosuf Karsh: An Armenian Refugee’s Pursuit of Greatness in Portraiture

Born in Armenia in 1908 to Christian Armenian parents, Karsh’s early childhood was defined by the atrocities committed by Turkey against the Armenian population at the start of the twentieth century. His father was forced into hiding to avoid arrest and, in 1921 the Karsh family were able to escape to Syria, accompanied by a donkey and no belongings. The course of Karsh’s life was changed when his uncle, George Nakash, wrote to the family from Canada asking for help in his photography studio. Karsh was sent on the 29-day trip from Beirut to Halifax in the second-class deck to join his uncle in Sherbrooke, Québec. His uncle recognised that the boy had a natural talent for photography and sent him to join his friend and fellow portrait photographer, John H. Garo, in Boston. Garo encouraged Karsh to attend evening art classes where he studied the Old Masters, specifically Rembrandt and Velázquez, and learnt to utilise composition and lighting to portray a sitter to their best advantage. In 1931 Karsh left Boston for Ottawa, with the …

2016-08-16T15:31:00+00:00

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Guido Harari’s portraits of Kate Bush document their ten-year collaboration

An upcoming exhibition at Project Space, Bermondsey showcases the images of Guido Harari over a ten year period as Kate Bush’s official photographer. The collection, which is taken from Harari’s book The Kate Inside, includes Polaroids, contact sheets, personal notes and out-takes from studio shoots alongside observations and reminiscences by the photographer. It’s foreword is written by Bush’s creative collaborator and artistic mentor, Lindsay Kemp, who is responsible for the initial introduction between Bush & Harari. BJP sat down with the Italian photographer to discuss a collection which sought to detail the personality of this complex icon.

2016-07-29T18:06:14+00:00

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How Manon Wertenbroek Captures Portraits from Parisian Buses

Manon Wertenbroek, a Swiss-Dutch artist, takes inspiration from modern expressionist and contemporary paintings in her portrait and still life photography. Born in 1991, she grew up in a small village by Lake Geneva, and is currently working and living in Paris. She uses photography as a medium to flirt with sculpture and paint, and, as a result, explores the relationship between the physical and emotional dimensions of human life. But her images are much more than just a simple snapshot. Wertenbroek puts in a great deal of craftswork before pressing the ‘take-photo’ button. In fact, her latest project, “Bus Travel”, derived from images of mirrored-paper sculptures generated by a computer screen, mixed with a reproduction of paintings onto the sculptures to create further reflections. She took inspiration directly from her observations of Paris and it’s travellers, and tells more about it in a letter to the city: “The clouds create shadows on the windows and on the passengers faces. No one speaks, it’s a quiet place that leaves room for imagination. From my seat at the …

2016-07-20T13:35:15+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Adama Jalloh

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. Entries close this Saturday – submit your work soon! We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Adama Jalloh.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? It’s a mixture of things – from the subject’s expression or mannerisms, the tones, the space, how the light might hit the subject. Its always interesting looking back at the results of an image, whether you’ve had 10 seconds of interaction with someone or spent a longer period of time with them. From time to time you get a sense of nervousness from strangers when you ask for their portrait, so being able to capture an unexpected emotion during brief encounters can be interesting. What attracts you to a potential subject? It could be based on the way they are …

2016-07-05T14:04:14+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Francesca Allen

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. DEADLINE TONIGHT – enter now. We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Francesca Allen.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? Colours, emotion, movement. I like to see that the image was part of a wider story, rather than someone sitting on chair for half an hour. There’s no recipe for a perfect portrait. The most beautiful portraits are those with a thumb over the lens and a blinking subject – what could be more honest than that moment of accidental unawareness?             What attracts you to a potential subject? I’m fascinated by the different ways people react in front of the camera, either by becoming totally in control of themselves or regressing into shyness. It’s a way of learning about myself too. I think that’s …

2016-07-02T10:38:08+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Tom Johnson

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. Due to exceptional demand we’ve extended the deadline to Saturday 2 July – find out more here and get involved. We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from photographer Tom Johnson.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? All the normal rules are really important – connection, structure & emotion. But I think there’s this element that you can’t really describe: that ‘off’ moment, or where everything seems to make sense and come together. What I find compelling about portraiture is the element of mystery each time. There is no formula of how it will turn out. It’s a combination between you and the subject, and sometimes that connection is instantaneous and other times more difficult and that can be a part of the reward. A compelling portrait is …

2016-06-30T14:53:30+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Samuel Bradley

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from London-based photographer Samuel Bradley.

2016-06-30T14:53:24+00:00

BJP Staff