All posts filed under: Portrait

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Max Pinckers – Japanese Tourist

In the West, Japan is like a fantasy. A strange, isolated culture of almost perfect self-preservation, we imagine suited Yakuza, manicured raw fish, a blubbery sumo, bonsai trees, samurai swords, wasted bankers, Geishas, karaoke. When Max Pinckers arrived in Japan, via a commission from the Belgium-based cultural project European Eyes on Japan, he couldn’t find much of the Japan he’d come to imagine.

2016-11-04T18:38:44+00:00

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Charlie Kwai’s Unapologetically Confrontational Street Photography

Born and raised in London, Charlie Kwai has always been fascinated by untold narratives about those around him, but it wasn’t until a stint working as a freelance graphic designer in tourist hotspot Piccadilly Circus that he started to carve out his singular niche in street photography. He soon discarded the Pentax K1000 he had stolen from college almost a decade earlier in favour of a digital camera, and began to seek respite from his frustrating day job by capturing the characters he found around him. “I’d go out on lunch and spend a full hour taking photos. I wouldn’t even eat sometimes, and then after work I would stay out from six until eight most nights,” he says. Before long, his uncanny ability to pinpoint moments of clarity and stillness in bustling crowds of tourists – a Burger King-crowned princess perched pensively on a stone step, or a family so archetypal they appear like a waxwork parody of themselves – grew into a day job all its own. “What gets me out of bed …

2016-10-25T16:23:37+00:00

Aly Gadiaga, Catania, Sicily, Italy, June 2015. Aly, 26, left Senegal and spent three years travelling to Libya, washing dishes in Mali and Burkina Faso in order to earn the money to board one of the dangerous convoys and cross the Sahara. Aly speaks Wolof (a language of Senegal), French, Italian and English fluently. He has lived in Catania for two years and has not yet received a work permit. Everyone in the market knows him as “Gucci”, a slang term for “good” or “all right”, because of his remarkably positive attitude. He has not seen his family for six years.
Images © John Radcliffe Studio.

Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016

On 13 and 19 April last year, two migrant boats capsized off the coast of Libya, with the loss of more than a thousand lives. Many of those who drowned were refugees, fleeing civil war, and therefore protected under the 1951 Refugee Convention, but their deaths won little sympathy on the pages of some of the UK’s biggest newspapers. On 17 April, The Sun columnist Katie Hopkins wrote an article comparing migrants to cockroaches or the norovirus, adding that Britain needed gunships, not rescue boats, to send them back. “No, I don’t care,” she wrote. “Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show me skinny people looking sad. I still don’t care.” As the so-called migrant crisis continued unabated, so too did the negative press. By July, the Daily Mail, Britain’s most-read newspaper brand and Hopkins’ new employer, was running headlines like “The ‘swarm’ on our streets”, calling for the army to go to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. A year later, the Daily Express warned of …

2016-10-20T12:14:51+00:00

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Photographer Mark Neville explores childhood play after commission by The Foundling Museum

As identified by the UN in the 2013 General Comment on Article 31 – the Convention on the Rights of the Child – a child has a universal human right to play. A new exhibition of photographs, as well as a symposium and photobook, by photographer Mark Neville, aims to generate debate around the complex nature of child’s play, and to advocate for improved provision for this universal right.

2016-10-10T12:13:23+00:00

SUBWAY NEW YORK, 1977-1984 © by Willy Spiller 2016

Willy Spiller’s Photographs from the New York Underground 1977 – 1984

In 1979, there were 250 serious crimes reported in the New York subway system – per week. There were six murders in the first two months alone. No other subway in the world was more crime-ridden and infamous. New Yorker Willy Spiller braved the labyrinth transport system for a photography series that says so much about the modern tone and texture of the world’s most iconic city. In a foreword to a new photobook, published by Sturm & Drang, Dr. Tobia Bezzola writes of Spiller’s achievements.

2016-10-05T17:11:20+00:00

BJP Staff