All posts filed under: Photojournalism

A 33-year-old cam model in a room of the "Studio N2" after his day shift, Bucharest, Romania, April 2016. The adult webcam industry is worth $1 billion annually, and is growing fast as the technology becomes better and cheaper. Collectively, the sites are estimated to be visited daily by some 5 percent of the web's global users and the number of models performing live online shows from private apartments or from specialised studios is increasing worldwide. Romania, a country with one of the highest rates of youth unemployment in the EU, is now the undisputed world capital of studio-based cam operations, thanks to widespread wireless broadband access. From the series Live chat studio industry © Lorenzo Maccotta, Italy, shortlist, Professional, Contemporary Issues, 2017 Sony World Photography Awards

Shortlist revealed for the 2017 Sony World Photography Awards

“There was a truly global reach to the Sony World Photography Awards judging this year – the images were more diverse and broad ranging than I have ever seen before,” said curator Zelda Cheatle, who was chair of the professional jury of the competition this year. The Awards, now in its tenth year, has just announced the shortlisted photographers, who between the represent 49 countries; the shortlist was drawn from some 227,596 images entered from 183 countries, including – for the first time – Armenia, Cuba, Iceland and Saudi Arabia. The winning photographers will be announced on 20 April, with the overall Photographer of the Year scooping a $25,000 cash prize plus Sony kit. Along with Zelda Cheatle, the 2017 professional competition was judged by Aida Muluneh, (founder/director of Addis Foto Fest), Allegra Cordero di Montezemolo (curator and head of exhibitions at Mexico’s Centro de la Imagen), Denis Curti, (an Italian curator and journalist), Russ O’Connell (picture editor of The Sunday Times Magazine) and Françoise Callier (program director at Angkor Photo Festival & Workshops). The winning, shortlisted and commended images will go …

2017-02-28T14:06:04+00:00

The Critic, 1943. Image © Weegee/International Center of Photography, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

On show – Weegee’s iconic images of New York’s seamy underbelly

Born near Lemburg in what’s now the Ukraine, Usher Fellig emigrated to the US in 1909 when he was ten. There he acquired a new, Anglicised name, Arthur, and started working as a photographer just three years later. In 1924 he was hired as a darkroom technician by Acme Newspictures (later United Press International Photos), and by 1935 – “spellbound by the mystery of murder”, as he put it – he had left to become a freelance news photographer. Centring his work around Manhattan’s police headquarters, his seemingly uncanny ability to get to crime scenes early earned him another new name – Weegee, inspired by the Ouija board (though another account traces it to his time as a darkroom “squeegee” boy). His talent for prescience was actually down to a portable police-band shortwave radio, which he got permission to run in 1938 – the only New York reporter to do so. Adding a complete darkroom in the boot of his car, Weegee was able to get his sensational images to newspapers such as the Herald-Tribune, Daily News, Post, The Sun, and PM Weekly long before anyone else. …

2017-02-23T12:57:39+00:00

Morton County Sheriffs - Riot police clear marchers from a secondary road outside a Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) worker camp using rubber bullets, pepper spray, tasers and arrests. In other incidents they've employed militarized vehicles, water canons, tear gas and have been accused of using percussion grenades. Image © Amber Bracken, first prize Contemporary Issues – Stories in the 2017 World Press Photos

Amber Bracken wins WPP award in Contemporary Issues category

Albertan photographer Amber Bracken is the 2017 first prize winner of the World Press Photography award in the Contemporary Issues category. Bracken, whose work is particularly concerned over the relationship between indigenous communities and the government in Canada and North America, has earned the high profile award for her documentation of the increasingly desperate protests against the North Dakota Pipeline at Standing Rock. “I’ve been compelled by issues of indigenous rights for some time now,” says Bracken. “Especially after Canada’s Idle No More movement. The fallout of colonisation and the ongoing betrayal of treaties is the greatest source of domestic injustice in the western world. ” The demonstrations in North Dakota began early last year, where the Standing Rock native Indian tribes and hundreds of others began to protest the construction of a water pipeline that would run from the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state, down to south Illinois. It would cross directly beneath the Mississippi Rivers and cut straight through a number of ancient, sacred burial sites. Just a few …

2017-03-01T17:34:51+00:00

Out of the Way © Elena Anosova, which won second prize in the Daily Life - Stories categories at the 2017 World Press Photo. World Press managing director Lars Boering says the paucity of women in photojournalism is one of the key issues he wants to debate at the organisation's many new initiatives this year

World Press Photo’s Lars Boering and the fight against “fake news”

Lars Boering, managing director of World Press Photo, joined the organisation in January 2015, just before that year’s prize was announced. It was an award beset with issues, as it emerged that more than 20% of the final-round entries had been disqualified for image-manipulation; then one of the winners – Giovanni Troilo, who had won first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Story category – was disqualified, when World Press found that an image he said had been shot in Charleroi, Brussels had been taken in Molenbeek. Boering countered with a new code of ethics for entrants, which meant that images submitted to the 2016 prize were more thoroughly checked – and were found to be less prone to manipulation. This year the issue with manipulation was at about the same level as in the 2016, he says, which leaves him to conclude that “it is still a very big media challenge”. “It’s not about World Press Photo, it’s industry-wide and we need to debate it,” he tells BJP. “It is something we feel very strongly about – there …

2017-02-13T17:31:06+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image ©

WPP-winning image “a staged murder for the press” says jury chair

“It’s a great news picture in the traditional way, and obviously the photographer himself demonstrated an extraordinary amount of composure to get it,” says Stuart Franklin, chair of the 2017 World Press Photo jury, of the winning image this year – which shows Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey. “But it is a staged murder for the press in a press conference, so there will be questions. It is a premeditated, staged murder at a press conference, which arguably you could put in the same envelope as the beheading of a prisoner in Raqqa [Syria]. I think that’s the dilemma one has about the picture.” And, continues Franklin, while he can’t go into detail about the judging process, “I can tell you, I didn’t vote for the photograph because of that dilemma”. “It is the moral issue that is a concern for me, personally,” he adds. For Franklin, Burhan Ozbilici’s series made a worthy Spot News winner, and he adds that “he did his …

2017-02-16T13:46:52+00:00

A young boy playing with a "pipa" (kite) on the roof of an unfinished condo. It is one of six buildings originally constructed for the middle class about 30 years ago; the mega project stopped after the construction company hit a financial crisis, and squatting started soon after. From the series Copacabana Palace © Peter Bauza

Peter Bauza’s Copacabana Palace wins at World Press Photo

Copacabana Palace is a complex of six concrete shells in Rio de Janeiro’s Campo Grande neighbourhood – buildings left unfinished 30 years ago after an economic crash stalled a housing project. The name comes from the eponymous five star hotel that looks over Rio’s Copacabana Beach, but the complex is also known as “Jambalaya”, the title of a Brazilian TV show, and “Carandiru”, the Sao Paulo prison where more than 100 inmates were massacred by police in 1992. When they were first abandoned, the Copacabana Palace buildings were looted and gutted of pipes, wires and electric cables. The hall floors have collapsed in many places. One building is completely uninhabitable, but the other five house about 300 families, some of whom have been squatting there for decades. German-born photographer Peter Bauza started taking pictures of them in June 2015, often sleeping in their homes. “When I appeared, they were just surprised to see a gringo there,” says Bauza. “I told them that I had an idea, that I would like to document their daily lives – their …

2017-02-14T14:09:10+00:00

Taking A Stand In Baton Rouge © Jonathan Bachman, Thomson Reuters. First prize, Contemporary Issues - Singles

The 2017 World Press Photo Contest winners are announced

The contest attracted 80,408 images, from 5034 photographers from 125 countries, and the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 45 photographers from 25 countries – Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Pakistan, Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Syria, New Zealand, Turkey, UK, USA. The World Press Photo of the Year is a shot by Turkish Associated Press photographer called Burhan Ozbilici, with an image he has simply titled An Assassination in Turkey. Showing Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, on 19 December 2016, the image is drawn from a wider series shot that night which won first place in the Spot News – Stories category. Other notable wins include Thomson Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman’s photograph of 28-year-old nurse Ieshia Evans, standing in front of riot police during a protest against police brutality outside the Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana, USA, on 9 July 2016, which one first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Singles …

2017-03-01T17:35:39+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image © AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici. World Press Photo of the Year, from a series which won first place in the Spot News - Stories category

Burhan Ozbilici wins the World Press Photo of the Year

Burhan Ozbilici wasn’t even working when he shot his World Press Photo-winning image – he was catching up with a friend, in an art gallery 150m from his home in Ankara. But, as the exhibition was a series of images of Russia, and the Russian ambassador Andrei Karlov was giving a speech, the Associated Press photographer “decided to do my job” and took his camera along. Standing “two or three rows back” with the other members of the press, he started to record the unremarkable moment – then found himself at a murder scene, as gunman Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş shot the ambassador dead, then stopped to proclaim “revenge for Syria and Aleppo” over his body. “I immediately understood it was a very important incident,” says Ozbilici. “Everyone ran away and threw themselves on the ground, or behind walls, or under tables, shouting and panicking. I thought running away was not a solution anyway, and decided to remain calm to risk antagonising the gunman further. I just kept shooting, changing my position to get a better angle, trying to capture this …

2017-02-13T13:02:56+00:00

Shimen Temple, from the series Hard Work © Ameena Rojee

Miniclick Soapbox comes to London

BJP‘s Ameena Rojee is one of six photographers presenting and discussing work at the Miniclick Soapbox event in London this Thursday. The University of West England graduate, who is also BJP‘s commercial campaign manager, will show the series Hard Work, shot at the School of Shaolin Kung Fu in Qufu, China. Rojee was originally inspired to visit the academy by the martial arts films she watched while growing up, but says the reality was very different. “The pollution was awful, greying the landscape almost daily, and I had a bad cough and no voice by the end of my month there,” she told BJP back in 2015. “I had quite romantic notions about the area when I was planning to go to; being out in what was quite a rural area, I was expecting lush greens and beautiful sunsets, rich colours and airs clearer than London. I found very much the opposite to what I’d expected, ideals built from a lifetime of watching visually gorgeous martial arts films.” Rojee will be showing her work alongside Joshua Parker, Maria Kapajeva, …

2017-01-23T15:27:20+00:00

President Barack Obama walks along the Colonnade of the White House with Chief White House Photographer Pete Souza and Brian Mosteller, Director of Oval Office Operations, Feb. 18, 2016. Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

Pete Souza on eight years as chief White House photographer

On 20 January 2017, the new US president will take office, and Pete Souza will finish his stint as the official chief White House photographer and director of the White House photo office. Souza previously spent five years at the White House photographing President Ronald Reagan, and has shot stories worldwide for titles such as National Geographic and Life. After 9/11, he was one of the first journalists to cover the fall of the Afghan capital, Kabul, after crossing the snowbound Hindu Kush on horseback. BJP caught up with him to find out more about his experiences. When I first attended Boston University, I aspired to become a sports writer. But I took a photography class in my junior year and it didn’t take long before I changed my mind about what I wanted to do. Luck made me the chief White House photographer. I met Senator Obama when I was working as the national photographer for the Chicago Tribune, and I spent a lot of time with him during his first two years in the Senate …

2017-02-07T12:39:14+00:00

BJP Staff