All posts filed under: Portrait

A design by Yoshikazu Yamagata, writtenafterwards © Todd Selby

On show: Todd Selby and his world of creative interiors

Back in 2008, Todd Selby shot Tom Wolfe at home in Prague for a magazine. The journal published a couple of the photographs but Selby, disappointed he couldn’t show more of the “amazing photos” he’d been able to take, decided to set up a website and post them online. Calling it theselby.com, he mailed some of his contacts to tell them what he was up to, and attracted about ten people per day. The number went up to 40 per day, then a thousand, then suddenly it snowballed, and he found he’d attracted 10,000 people in one day and an article in The New York Times. Less than ten years later the self-taught Selby attracts up to 100,000 people in a day to his site, has worked with brands such as Louis Vuitton, Fendi and Nike, and has published three books The Selby is In Your Place (2010), Edible Selby (2012) and Fashionable Selby (2014). He’s also shown his work at Colette in Paris, and now has his first solo museum show – The Selby’s House at Daelim …

2017-04-25T16:18:43+00:00

Holloway Road, London - March 2016 © Niall McDiarmid

On show: Niall McDiarmid’s Here and Now London Portraits

“Individually these photos represent the moment that we crossed paths, but collectively they represent my portrait of London – a confident city, a city of the future, a city I call home,” says Niall McDiarmid, who has been shooting portraits on the streets of Britain’s capital for the last six years. McDiarmid is showing a selection of these portraits in an outdoor exhibition at the Museum of London this summer, helping kick off the institution’s year-long City Now City Future programme. Rarely shooting more than a few yards from where he meets his subjects, McDiarmid notes the date and place of each encounter, building an archive of work that stands as a collective portrait of the metropolis. Originally from Scotland, McDiarmid is now based in London but has won acclaim for the street portraits he takes across the UK. His first book, Crossing Paths, A Portrait of Britain, was published in 2013. A second book, Via Vauxhall, followed in 2015. McDiarmid’s show opens alongside two other exhibitions focused on London – a series of newly commissioned interactive films by artist …

2017-04-20T12:56:47+00:00

"Ice Skating, Lai Yuen Amusement Park, Hong Kong" (now demolished), 1997 © Wo Bik Wong

Festival: Look Photo opens in Liverpool this weekend

Liverpool – home of The Beatles, a passion for football and the unforgettable Scouse accent; Hong Kong – one of the world’s key financial centres, towering skyline, exotic cuisine and ongoing violations of human rights. It might seem unlikely, but there are parallels to be drawn. Both are historically part of the British Empire and both brazen a rich maritime past with large trading ports still used today – perhaps one reason why the northwest England metropolitan borough is home to the oldest Chinatown in Europe and some 10,000 Chinese residents. It comes as no surprise, then, that Liverpool’s biennial International Photography Festival, curated by Hong Kong-based Ying Kwok, hones in on this complex, age-old relationship for its upcoming edition – which opens on 07 April. Sarah Fisher, the executive director of the Open Eye Gallery, the central venue for a number of specially-commissioned exhibitions at the festival, explains that today’s 10,000 residents are a fusion of two communities – the second and third generation Cantonese speakers from Hong Kong, “whose parents established Chinatown”, and those …

2017-04-06T14:22:35+00:00

Rosy Nicholas from the book Hackney Studios © Jenny Lewis

Photobook: Jenny Lewis’ Hackney Studios

Hackney has long been celebrated as London’s creative hub, but soaring rent increases are pushing the painters, illustrators, filmmakers, jewellers, ceramicists and fashion designers out of their studios. Jenny Lewis spent four years shooting these creatives in their workspaces and her new book, Hackney Studios, stands as a celebration – and perhaps a commemoration – of a very special time and place. Hackney Studios is published by Hoxton Mini Press, priced £20. www.hoxtonminipress.com  

2017-04-06T13:02:13+00:00

Maghera’s Cross viewing spot near Portrush, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, during Justin and Jackie's week long holiday. Justin has been dating Jackie for over 20 years. It’s kind of unexpected to see Justin maintaining this relationship and for such a long period of time. I know I have plenty of very functioning friends who struggle forming relationships. From the series Big Brother © Louis Quail

Project: Louis Quail’s Big Brother

“If you are on the lowest rung of society, if when you get on a bus people turn away from you, it’s nice to be noticed,” says Louis Quail. “It’s nice to be seen.” We’re talking about his project Big Brother, which recently won the portfolio review prize at Format International Photography Festival and will soon be published as a book. Shot over the last six years, it’s a portrait of Quail’s older brother Justin, who is now 58 and has suffered from schizophrenia for his whole adult life. Quail doesn’t shy away from the obvious effects of his brother’s illness, showing his wrecked shoes and chaotic flat, and including police notes and medical records that speak of medication, sectioning and arrest. But his project also shows another side to Justin – one less familiar, perhaps, in our conception of the mentally ill. It includes Justin’s excellent drawings and paintings, his poetry, and his love of bird watching; it also shows his girlfriend Jackie, who also has mental issues and is an alcoholic, but who …

2017-04-06T16:01:16+00:00

The Haystack, 1844, from The Pencil of Nature by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-77). Salted paper print © The RPS Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The V&A announces a new Photography Centre in London

Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new centre will open in Autumn 2018 and more than double the V&A’s current photography exhibition space. The opening will be accompanied by a museum-wide photography festival, a new digital resource, and a new history of photography course run with the Royal College of Art. The V&A plans to run events and activities in the new centre, and will continue to expand the facility. Phase Two will see the museum add more gallery space, and create a teaching and research facility, a browsing library, and a studio and darkroom which will enable photographers’ residencies. The new centre comes as the V&A transfers the Royal Photographic Society’s collection from the Science Museum Group, which was formerly held in the National Media Museum in Bradford. The transfer adds over 270,000 photographs, 26,000 publications, and 6000 pieces of equipment to the V&A’s holdings – which was already one of the largest and most important in the world, including around 500,000 works collected since the foundation of the museum in 1852. The RPS collection includes …

2017-04-06T16:45:30+00:00

From the series The Canary and the Hammer © Lisa Barnard

Festival review: what’s hot at Format

In August of 2016, at the International Geological Congress in Cape Town, one of the world’s leading scientists declared we were living at the dawn of a new geological epoch – the human-influenced age. This new era, termed Anthropocene, replaces the current epoch, the Holocene, the 12,000 years of stable climate since during which all human civilisation developed. Format International Photography Festival in Derby, the UK’s largest photography festival, opened this weekend for its eighth edition, aiming to explore this notion of the Anthropocene by asking photographers to respond to the word “habitat”. Featuring more than 200 international artists and photographers across 30 exhibitions, the biennial is situated across independent cinema and exhibition spaces such as Quad, University of Derby and the Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The festival’s flagship exhibition, titled Ahead Still Lies Our Future, is on show at art space Derby Quad, and features work by ten photographers, brought together by curators Hester Keijser and festival director Louise Clements. “I wanted to offer up experiences concerning the complexity of our existence on …

2017-03-28T11:46:25+00:00

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Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian crisis, …

2017-03-20T15:23:30+00:00

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Dougie Wallace goes live and direct on BBC4

The inimitable Dougie Wallace comes out from behind the camera on 16 March, in a 30-minute documentary screened on BBC4 at 8.30pm. Part of the mini-series What Do Artists Do All Day? the programme follows Wallace on the streets of Chelsea and Knightsbridge as he shoots the images for his forthcoming book, Harrodsburg; it also shows him at work in Blackpool, and includes walk-on parts for photographer Martin Parr (who collects his work), and Dewi Lewis (who is publishing Harrodsburg). Born in Glasgow and serving in the army before getting into photography via selling used camper vans and backpacking, Wallace started Harrodsburg after reading that a man born in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea has a life expectancy of 84.4, the longest average lifespan of anywhere in the UK; boys born in Calton in Glasgow – near where Wallace grew up – have a life expectancy of just 53.9. Harrodsburg won the inaugural Magnum Photography Award in 2016, and the series will be exhibited at the printspace in Shoreditch, where the book will also be launched at 7.30pm on 21 …

2017-03-16T11:54:16+00:00

BJP Staff