All posts filed under: Portrait

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Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian crisis, …

2017-03-20T15:23:30+00:00

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Dougie Wallace goes live and direct on BBC4

The inimitable Dougie Wallace comes out from behind the camera on 16 March, in a 30-minute documentary screened on BBC4 at 8.30pm. Part of the mini-series What Do Artists Do All Day? the programme follows Wallace on the streets of Chelsea and Knightsbridge as he shoots the images for his forthcoming book, Harrodsburg; it also shows him at work in Blackpool, and includes walk-on parts for photographer Martin Parr (who collects his work), and Dewi Lewis (who is publishing Harrodsburg). Born in Glasgow and serving in the army before getting into photography via selling used camper vans and backpacking, Wallace started Harrodsburg after reading that a man born in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea has a life expectancy of 84.4, the longest average lifespan of anywhere in the UK; boys born in Calton in Glasgow – near where Wallace grew up – have a life expectancy of just 53.9. Harrodsburg won the inaugural Magnum Photography Award in 2016, and the series will be exhibited at the printspace in Shoreditch, where the book will also be launched at 7.30pm on 21 …

2017-03-16T11:54:16+00:00

Kolobrzeg, Poland, July 26, 1992 © Rineke Dijkstra

Rineke Dijkstra wins the 2017 Hasselblad Award

“Rineke Dijkstra’s photographs and films speak brilliantly to the intricacy of the portrait image: its embodiment in time; its capacity to reveal history; the contingency of the act of exchange between sitter, photographer and spectator; and, ultimately, photography’s revelation of the self. “At a moment when the portrait image dissipates itself in an economy of narcissism and fractal celebrity, Rineke Dijkstra reminds us of the photographic portrait’s public potential,” says Duncan Forbes, chair of the jury for the Hasselblad Award 2017, which has awarded the Dutch photographer the SEK1,000,000 prize [just over £90,000]. Born in 1959 in Sittard, The Netherlands, Dijkstra attended the Gerrit Rietveld Academy and first came to prominence in the 1990s, with a series of photographs of mothers and their children moments after birth, and with portraits of bullfighters just after leaving the ring. In the series Beach Portraits [1992-2002], she showed children by the sea in Europe and the USA, picking out youngsters on the cusp of adolescence. Dijkstra is known for working on long-term projects, such as her series of images of …

2017-03-09T14:52:09+00:00

Lina, in her bedroom she shares wih her two sisters. From the series My Favourite Colour Was Yellow © Kirsty MacKay

Photobook: My Favourite Colour Was Yellow by Kirsty MacKay

Kirsty MacKay has two daughters, one ten and one two; when her oldest was a baby she didn’t buy much pink, she says, but “kind of accumulated it anyway”. “We had so many pink clothes I could do a separate pink wash,” she says. “Although as a parent I didn’t like it. “I grew up in the 1970s wearing boiler suits and dungarees and playing with Meccano and Lego,” she adds. “So what I couldn’t understand was how we could have gone back when feminism has moved so much.” Intrigued by the power of this cultural norm she decided to start photographing it, starting with her friends and friends’ children in Bristol, then widening the scope to include strangers and those based elsewhere in Britain. She ended up shooting for six years, amassing over 3000 images. “I took a lot of photographs, but I ended up not using very many from the start,” she says. “They just weren’t good enough, because I was uncomfortable with the idea I was going into someone’s house and potentially criticising their …

2017-03-08T14:46:25+00:00

From the book Dalston in the 80s © Andrew Holligan

Q&A: Andrew Holligan on his new book, Dalston in the 80s

Now known as a hip place to be, Dalston was then a cheap place to live ill-served by public transport. While living in the neighbourhood, Andrew Holligan shot the people he came across with a 1950s Rolleiflex, creating an archive of images which has now been published as a book. BJP: Why did you move to Dalston? AH: I moved there because a friend had offered me his flat while he was away. A lot of friends were moving to East London in the 80s because it was cheaper than elsewhere in central London. There were also a lot of empty commercial/light industrial buildings available for studios. I then spent a year in Australia, then moved back into a live/work space near London Fields, Hackney. BJP: Had you known anything about it before? AH: I had never been to Dalston before and knew nothing about the place, even though I had spent some of my childhood in Islington. I had been living in New York City for three years prior to moving to Dalston. BJP: Were you …

2017-03-06T15:21:00+00:00

Wilteysha, 1993 © Dana Lixenberg. Courtesy of the artist and Grimm, Amsterdam

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2017 exhibition opens

Questions of truth and fiction, doubt and certainty, and the relationship between the observer and the observed are the key themes of the 2017 Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize. The £30,000 prize rewards a living photographer, of any nationality, for a specific body of work in an exhibition or publication format, which is felt to have significantly contributed to the medium of photography between 1 October 2015 and 30 September 2016. Sophie Calle, born in 1953 in France, has been nominated for her publication My All which finds the artist experimenting with yet another medium – the postcard set. Taking stock of her entire œuvre, this set of postcards functions as a portfolio of Calle’s work, as well as a new investigation of it, in an appropriately nomadic format. Over the past thirty years, Sophie Calle has invited strangers to sleep in her bed, followed a man through the streets of Paris to Venice, hired a detective to spy on herself before providing a report of her day, and asked blind people to tell her about the …

2017-03-02T13:47:53+00:00

A dog walks on a rooftop near Süleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, March 2015. From the series November is a beginning © Esa Ylijaasko

November is a beginning for Esa Ylijaasko

“Photographers have a responsibility to tell these stories,” says Esa Ylijaasko of his project, November is a beginning, which shows a community of Syrian refugees living in Istanbul. Forced out by the civil war some 2.9 million Syrians have fled to Turkey, of whom about 800,000 have settled in the capital city, many in the formerly abandoned Süleymaniye neighbourhood. Knowing little Turkish and lacking the right documentation, they are left in a kind of limbo – unable to work legally, they rely on their meagre savings, cash-in-hand jobs and charity. “If they’re are caught by the police, they are sent to refugee camps,” explains Ylijaasko. “But as illegal workers, they earn below the minimum wage – around $250 to $300 USD monthly, which is just enough to cover their living expenses. Kind-hearted locals bring food and clothes, helping them to survive. But life stands still.” Originally from Finland, Ylijaasko started shooting the series back in 2013, after moving to Istanbul and hearing about the community. “I decided I’d try at least,” he says. “More people can help …

2017-03-02T15:32:59+00:00

From the series Bright Days © Maryam Khastoo & Jonathan Clifford

A different side of Iran by Maryam Khastoo and Jonathan Clifford

In October 2016, Maryam Khastoo and Jonathan Clifford went to Iran to work on Khastoo’s ongoing project on her mother. Born to Iranian parents in Wales, Khastoo has visited the country regularly since she was a child, and lived there from 2010-2014; her mother now lives in Tehran, and Khastoo and Clifford spent ten days with her, Khastoo taking photographs and Clifford shooting film. After they’d finished work in the capital they “felt the need to get out” says Clifford, who was raised in Australia, and headed north for the quiet towns between the Caspian Sea and Alborz Mountain range. “Everyone we spoke of our plans with insisted that we go south to Isfahan, Shiraz or Yazd, which are the most common destinations for visitors to Iran due to their historical importance,” says Clifford. “But although these places certainly appealed, the idea of heading north, where Maryam has family, and staying with them on their orange and kiwi orchard, seemed a much better way to unwind after the hustle and chaos of Tehran. “We’d also discussed …

2017-02-23T16:35:48+00:00

Peace Moves. Greenham Commom, Berkshire 1982 © Edward Barber

Obituary: Edward Barber 1949-2017

It’s a terrible shock and great sadness to be writing about Ed in the past tense. He was a great friend of mine for nearly 40 years, a man who believed passionately in the power of photography to show how people live, how they protest against the powerful and how people create things that counteract the corporate machine. We worked together on many projects for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) and at the Half Moon Gallery and its magazine Camerawork. Ed was one of the original members of the collective at the Half Moon in Alie Street, Whitechapel, with fellow photographers Jenny Matthews, Mike Goldwater and Paul Trevor. This was to prove to be incredibly dynamic and brilliant group who curated numerous influential photographic exhibitions, many of which were by photographers who have continued to produce important work, as they have themselves. Ed had the idea of laminating the exhibitions, at first because the roof leaked in Alie Street and plastic lamination made them waterproof. He began touring the laminated exhibitions, sending them by …

2017-03-01T17:32:12+00:00

BJP Staff